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Full text of "Rice University General announcements"

Rice University 

Genenil Announcements 

1988-89 



*■■%-- ^ 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/riceuniversityge198889hous 



NOTE: This catalog represents the most accurate information available at the time 
of publication. However, it necessarily cannot reflect changes in staff and costs over 
the longer term. As far as courses are concerned, the departments have used their best 
judgment in anticipating which courses will be offered over the two-year period and 
when they will be offered. Despite their best efforts, though, the inevitable changes in 
faculty as well as student demand and even funding, in some cases, may affect course 
offerings. A good faith effort has been made to indicate these uncertainties 
appropriately. 

Offices to contact for additional information: 

Mailing Address: Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 
Location: 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 
Telephone: (713) 527-8101 

Please address all correspondence to the appropriate office or department fol- 
lowed by the University mailing address given above. 



Admission, Catalogs, Applications 



Office of Admission 

109 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4036 



Business Matters 



Office of the Cashier 

1 1 Allen Center; (7 1 3) 527-4946 



Career Placement, Part-time 
Employment off Campus 



Rice Memorial Center; (713) 527-4055 



Continuing Education 



Office of Continuing Studies 

(713)527-4803 

Center for Continuing Studies 



Credits, Transcripts 



Office of the Registrar 

103 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4999 



Financial Aid, Scholarships, Financial Aid Office 

Part-time Employment on Campus 201 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4958 



Graduate Study 



Chairman of the Appropriate 
Department 



Housing for Undergraduates 



Office of Admission 

109 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4036 



Undergraduate Students, 
Undergraduate Curricula 



Office of the Vice-President for 

Student Affairs 

1 1 Lovett Hall; (7 1 3) 527-4996 



The policy of this institution is to attract to its faculty, staff and student body 
qualified persons of diverse backgrounds. In accordance with this policy. Rice does 
not discriminate in admissions, educational programs, or employment against any 
individual on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, national or ethnic origin, or 
handicap. University policy also includes affirmative action in seeking to recruit and 
advance women, minority group members, handicapped individuals, and veterans. 



Table of 
Contents 



The University and the Campus 1 

Administration and Staff 

Board of Governors 4 

Administration 6 

Administrative Offices 6 

College Masters and Comasters 7 

Rice University Associates 8 

Instructional and Research Staff. 13 

Standing Committees 58 

Chairs and Lectureships 58 

Information for Undergraduate Students 

Degree Requirements, Majors, and Curricula 62 

Academic Regulations 83 

Extended Time Graduation 91 

Rice Tutorial Program 92 

Admission of New Students 92 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 99 

Financial Aid 102 

Scholarships and Awards 105 

Honor Societies 1 16 

Student Life 1 17 

Information for Graduate Students 

Research Degrees 126 

Professional Degrees 127 

Admission to Graduate Study 133 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 136 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 137 

Financial Aid 140 

Student Life 141 

Courses of Instruction 

Explanation of Numbering System 145 

Accounting and Administrative Science 146 

Anthropology 161 



Architecture 172 

Art and Art History 185 

Biochemistry 198 

Biology 203 

Chemical Engineering 232 

Chemistry 208 

Civil Engineering 238 

Classics 213 

Computer Science 244 

Economics 217 

Education 225 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 250 

Engineering and Applied Science 231 

Environmental Science and Engineering 259 

English 283 

French and Italian 293 

Geology and Geophysics 300 

German and Slavic Studies 308 

History 317 

Human Performance and Health Sciences 330 

Humanities 336 

Italian 293 

Linguistics and Semiotics 338 

Managerial Studies 346 

Materials Science/Engineering 270 

Mathematical Sciences 263 

Mathematics 346 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials 

Science/Engineering 270 

Military Science 351 

Music 353 

Naval Science 369 

Philosophy 371 

Physics 376 

Policy Studies 382 

Political Science 383 

Portuguese 414 

Psychology 391 

Religious Studies 396 

Slavic Studies 308 

Sociology 403 

Space Physics and Astronomy 408 

Spanish, Portuguese, and Classics 414 

Statistics 419 

Academic Calendar 424 

Index 426 



The University 
and the Campus 



Dedicated to the "the advancement of letters, science, and art," Rice is 
private, independent, nonsectarian, and coeducational. It includes among its 
academic divisions both undergraduate and graduate studies in the humanities, 
social sciences, natural sciences, engineering, architecture, administrative sci- 
ences, and music. 

Highly talented students with diverse interests are attracted to Rice by the 
opportunities for creative learning. They fmd rewarding student-faculty relation- 
ships, options for individually tailored programs of study, opportunities for 
research, cooperative activities with other institutions in the nation's fourth 
largest city, and the unique experience of residential colleges. 

About 60 percent of Rice's 2,500 undergraduate students live on campus in 
the eight residential colleges. The colleges have independent student governments, 
plan social functions, field intramural teams, and sponsor innovative academic 
courses, distinguished speakers, plays, and other functions. In each college, the 
college master, comaster, and approximately 20 faculty associates act as advisers 
to the students. This system provides students and faculty with a style of living in 
keeping with the tenets of fine education. 

Rice's approximately 1 ,000 graduate students work closely with faculty mem- 
bers who are eminent in their fields and conduct innovative research to extend the 
horizons of current knowledge. Graduate students live off campus or in the 
University-owned Graduate House. The Graduate Student Association organizes 
and funds regular social activities and provides graduate students with a separate 
organization to represent their interests within the University. 

A look through the archway of Lovett Hall shows even the casual visitor why 
the 300-acre Rice campus is widely acclaimed for its dignified yet casual beauty. 
Approximately 40 permanent buildings are conveniently grouped in quadrangles 
under graceful live oak trees. The city's largest stadium, the Fondren Library, the 
Media Center, the gymnasium, and the computer center as well as its dramatic and 
musical presentations make Rice "behind the hedges" a community unto itself. 
Yet, only three miles from downtown Houston, Rice students enjoy all the com- 
mercial and cultural advantages of a major metropolitan center. 



Rice 

University 

Campus 



The Ralph S. O'Connor House 

Margarett Root Brown College 

Brown House 

Mary Gibbs Jones College 

Jones House 

Physical Plant Buildings 

Central Kitchen/AROTC 

Ryon Engineering Laboratory 

(Civit Engineering /Computer Science/ 
Materials Science} 

Mechanical Laboratory 
(Environmental Science 
& Engineering) 

Abercrombie Labs 
(Electrical & Computer Engineering/ 
Chemical Engineering 

Bonner Nuclear Research Laboratory 

Chemistry Building 

Herman Brown Hall 
(Math/Math Science/Computer 
Science) 

Mudd Building (ICSA) 

Hamman Hall (Auditorium) 

Space Science Building 
(Space Physics & Astronomy/Rice 
Quantum Institute) 

Flammable Chemicals 

Storage Building 

Kelth-Wiess Geological Laboratories 

Anderson Biological Laboratories 
(Biochemistry /Biology) 

Rice Memorial Center 
Association of Rice Alumni/Career 
Planning and Placement /Food & 
Housing/Rice Student Volunteer 
Program/Rice Campus Store/ 
Sammy's /Willy's Pub/MOB 
Ley Student Center 
(Student Activities/Student Advising/ 
Student Association /Graduate Student 
Association /KJRU/ Thresher/ 
Campanile /Rice Program Counctl/and 
various other student organizations 




21 Rice Memorial Chapel 

22 Fondren Library (History) 

23. Anderson Hall (Architecture) 

24. Physics Laboratories 

25. Lovelt Hall (Administrative otf ices/ 

Admissions/ Records/Religious 
Studies /Philosophy) 

26. SewaM Hall (Art /Music /Social 

Sciences / Educa tion) 

27. Rayzor Hall (English /Foreign 

Languages/ Humanities/ Linguistics) 

28. Herring Hall (Jones Graduate School 

of Administration) 

29. Cohen House (Faculty Club) 

30. Allen Center (or Business Activities 

31. James A. Baker College 
32 Baker House 
33- WIess House 
34. Harry C. Wiess College 
35- Harry C. Hanszen College 
36. Hanszen House 

37 Will Rice College 

38. Will Rice House 

39. Edgar Odell Lovett College 

40 Lovett House 

41 Sid W, Richardson College 



42 Richardson House 

43 Center for Continuing Studies 

44 Rice Media Center 
(Photography! 

45. Gymnasium and Autry Court 
(Health & PE/ Athletics) 

46. Owl Club Room, R" Room 

47 Rice Stadium 

48 Mechanical Engmeenng 

49 The Graduate House 

50 Campus Police/Military & Naval 
Science/Administrative Store 




Entrance areas are marked by numbers 1 through 15. 
^p Signifies parking lots. 
% Emergency Phones 



Administration 
and Staff 



Board of Governors 



Trustees 

Charles W. Duncan, Jr., Chair 
Josephine E. Abercrombie, Vice-Chair 
J. Evans Attwell 
John L. Cox 



C. M. Hudspeth 
Ralph S. O'Connor 
Jack T. Trotter 



Term Members 

J.D. Bucky Allshouse 

D. Kent Anderson 
James A. Elkins III 
J. Thomas Eubank 

Alumni Governors 

Carolyn Douglas Devine 
Joyce Pounds Hardy 

Trustees Emeriti 

Herbert Allen 

E. D. Butcher 
Harry J. Chavanne 
Oveta Culp Hobby 

Governor Advisors 

Judy Ley Allen 
Richard A. Chapman 
John W. Cox 
Thomas H. Cruikshank 
William S. Parish III 
James W. Glanville 
Catherine C. Hannah 
James W. Hargrove 
Gerald D. Hines 
Paul N. Howell 
Carl Illig 



Neal T. Lacey, Jr. 
Burton J. McMurtry 
Thomas D. Smith 



Jerry McCleskey 
Paula Meredith Mosle 



W. A. Kirkland 
Theodore N. Law 
H. Malcolm Lovett 
James U. Teague 



Mary E. Johnston 
Jack S. Josey 
Howard B. Keck 
Edward W. Kelley, Jr. 
Baine P. Kerr 
William F. Kieschnick 
Wendel D. Ley 
J. Hugh Liedtke 
William M. McCardell 
J. W. McLean 
James R. Meyers 



George R. Miner 
Pat H. Moore 
S. I. Morris 
Walter D. Murphy 
Ralph W. Noble II 
Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 
M. Kenneth Oshman 
J. Howard Rambin 



David L. Rooke 
Frank B. Ryan 
Harry K. Smith 
Louis D. Spaw, Jr. 
Karl C. ten Brink 
James O. Winston, Jr. 
Benjamin N. Woodson 
Helen S. Worden 



Vice-President for Financial Affairs and Treasurer James W. Glanville 

Associate Vice President for Financial Affairs and 

Associate Treasurer Scott W. Wise 

Assistant Secretary Joseph F. White 



6 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Administration 



President George Rupp 

Provost and Vice-President Neal F. Lane 

Associate Provost and Vice President for 

Information Systems Edward F. Hayes 

Vice-President for Student Affairs Ronald F. Stebbings 

Vice-President for Administration William W. Akers 

Vice-President for Financial Affairs and Treasurer James W. Glanville 

Vice-President for External Affairs Kent E. Dove 

Associate Vice-President for Financial Affairs and 

Associate Treasurer Scott Wise 

Dean of the School of Architecture O. Jack Mitchell 

Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering Michael M. Carroll 

Dean of the Wiess School of Natural Sciences James L. Kinsey 

Dean of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 

of Administration Benjamin F. Bailar 

Dean of the School of Humanities Allen J. Matusow 

Dean of the Shepherd School of Music Michael Hammond 

Dean of the School of Social Sciences James R. Pomerantz 

Dean of Admission and Records Richard N. Stabell 

Dean of Continuing Studies Mary B. Mclntire 



Administrative Offices 



Admission Ron W. Moss 

Affirmative Action Eva J. Lee 

Alumni Association Susan R. Baker 

Athletics Jerry Berndt 

Computer Services Priscilla Huston 

Development Office Margarets. Alsobrook 

Financial Aid G. David Hunt 

Fondren Library Samuel M. Carrington 

Food and Housing Marion O. Hicks 

Graduate Studies Graham P. Glass 

Networking and Planning Farrell E. Gerbode 

Personnel Erbel S. Perkins 

Physical Facilities Edwin Samfield 

Placement John B. Evans 

Proctor E. C. Hoh 

Registrar James G. Williamson 

Secretary to the Faculty Stephen D. Baker 

Sponsored Research Joe W. Hightower 

Student Activities and Advising Patricia S. Martin 

University Police Department Harold R. Rhodes 

University Relations Bill Noblitt 



RICE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 7 

College Masters and Comasters 



Baker College Roderick and Susan Mcintosh 

Brown College John and Carolyn Brelsford 

Hanszen College Peter and Nancy Waldman 

Jones College Sam Davis and Priscilla Huston 

Lovett College Robert and Gerry Jump 

Richardson College James Disch 

Wiess College Joan Rea 

Will Rice College Edward and Andrea Doughtie 



8 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Rice University Associates 



Contributing 

Mrs. Josephine E. Abercrombie 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis K. Adler 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Kent Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Leland Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Andrews 

Mr. and Mrs. Kingsland Arnold 

Mr. and Mrs. Roman F. Arnoldy 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans Attwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Avery 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beall 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Bellows 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren S. Bellows, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rice Bethea 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Blair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Blocker 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Bonham 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Boone 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar O. Bottler 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Bracht 

Mr. Timothy L. Bratton 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark W. Breeding 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac S. Brochstein 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Bullen, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Butcher 

Mrs. Charles L. Bybee 

Mr. and Mrs. Emory T. Carl 

Mr. and Mrs. Durell Carothers 

Mr. and Mrs. David F. Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Chavanne 

Dr. and Mrs. Claude C. Cody III 

Mrs. Hugh H. Cooper, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Cooper III 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Crosswell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Cruikshank 

Mrs. John de Menil 

Mrs. Katherine B. Dobelman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Duncan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Elder, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins III 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Eubank 

Amb. and Mrs. Albert B. Fay 



Life Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Finger 

Mrs. Herbert Frensley 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Glanville 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Franklin Glass, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Glenn 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh E. Gragg 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Greenwood 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hannah, Jr. 

Mrs. Joyce Pounds Hardy 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hargrove 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hargrove 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Heard 

Mrs. Jacob Henry Hess, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. Hines 

Mrs. Maurice Hirsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Hoagland 

Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby 

The Honorable and Mrs. William P. 

Hobby 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Holland 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul N. Howell 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Hudspeth 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Illig 
Mr. and Mrs. David D. Itz 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. James P. Jackson 
Mr. Meredith H. James, Jr. 
Mr. Robert D. Jameson 
Mrs. Charlotte Collins Johnson 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Johnston 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Joplin 
Mrs. Edward W. Kelley 
The Honorable and Mrs. Edward W. 

Kelley, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Kelly 
Mr. and Mrs. Lebbeus C. Kemp, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baine P. Kerr 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyd Kilgore 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J. Knapp 
Mr. and Mrs. Neal T. Lacey, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore N. Law 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. Lay 
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy K. Lents 
Dr. John N. Loomis 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Malcolm Lovett 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lykes, Jr. 
Mr. John F. Lynch 



RICE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 9 



Mr. and Mrs. S. Maurice 

McAshan, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. McCardell 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry McCleskey 
Mr. and Mrs. Don E. McMahon 
Mr. and Mrs. Burton J. McMurtry 
Mr. Speros P. Martel 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris Masterson III 
Mrs. Byron Meredith 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Meyer III 
Judge and Mrs. James R. Meyers 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Miner 
Mr. and Mrs. Pat H. Moore 
Mrs. Thomas W. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Moore, Jr. 
Mrs. William T. Moran 
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Morris 
Mr. and Mrs. Jon L. Mosle, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Murphy 
Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Nad 
Mr. I. A. Naman 
Mrs. Wheeler Nazro 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Neilan 
Mrs. Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Noble II 
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Norbeck 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. O'Connor 
Mr. Henry Oliver 
Mr. and Mrs. Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Kenneth Oshman 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Bernard Pieper 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Pierce, Jr. 
Mr. Edward Randall III 
Mr. William J. Rapson, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Newton Rayzor 
Mr. and Mrs. N. Claxton Rayzor 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Reed 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Rogers III 
Mr. and Mrs. Nat S. Rogers 

Life 

Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Adams, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Allbritton 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wiley N. Anderson, Jr. 

Mrs. Forrest L. Andrews 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Austin 

Mrs. James A. Baker, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovett Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Barnhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Alec C. Bayless, Jr. 

Mrs. Raymond M. Bayless 



Mr. and Mrs. David L. Rooke 

Mrs. Charlotte A. Rothwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Clive Runnells 

Sylvia and Seymour Sacks 

Mr. Fayez Sarofim 

Mrs. Louisa Stude Sarofim 

Dr. H. Irving Schweppe, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben G. Sewell 

Mrs. Samuel T. Sikes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert K. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Smith 

Mr. Lloyd Hilton Smith 

Mrs. R. E. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis D. Spaw, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. John Stanton, Jr. 

Mr. Seldon Steed 

Mrs. W. Mclver Streetman 

Mrs. H. Gardiner Symonds 

Mr. and Mrs. James U. Teague 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Tellepsen 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl C. ten Brink 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren T. Thagard III 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack T. Trotter 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph F. 

Weichert, Jr. 
Dr. Damon Wells, Jr. 
Mrs. Wesley West 
Mrs. Willoughby C. Williams 
Mrs. Friedarica Barbour Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. James O. Winston, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Wintermann 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Winters 
Mrs. Sam P. Worden 
Mr. John H. Wright 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Yates, Jr. 

Members 

Mr. Norman A. Binz 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Blair 
Mrs. James C. Boone 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Bravenec 
Dr. and Mrs. John H. Brennan 
Mrs. James L. Britton 
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Broyles 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burrow 
Mrs. John C. Bybee 



1 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Carruth 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory P. Catsinas 

Miss Mary E. Chavanne 

Mrs. R. Sperry Clarke 

Mrs. J. P. Coleman 

Mr. Michael Cooper/Ms. Sandra L. 

Brunow 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Cooper 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cox 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Crooker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd K. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Decker 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Delaney 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Dickey 
Mrs. Robert P. Doherty, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Dore 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Topping Douglas 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Douglass 
Mrs. Elva Kalb Dumas 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Duncan 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Espinoza 
Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey M. Farb 
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Parish III 
Mrs. Johanna A. Favrot 
Mrs. F. T. Fendley 
Mrs. Herbert E. Fisher 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Fite, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles I. Francis 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Franzheim II 
Mr. Peter M. Frost 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Garrett 
Mr. and Mrs. Ranald M. "Don" 

Garrison 
Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Gaylord 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry D. George 
Mr. and Mrs. Basil Georges 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Ted Georges 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. 
Mr. Wayne K. Goettsche 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Goff 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gonzalez 
Mr. and Mrs. Aron S. Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. Saunders Gregg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jenard M. Gross 
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Hackerman 
Mr. Walter G. Hall 
Mrs. Charles W. Hamilton 
Mrs. George W. Hansen 
Mrs. Karl F. Hasselmann 



Dr. and Mrs. Charles B. Headrick 

Mr. Erwin Heinen 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hershey 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Horton 

Mrs. William V. Houston 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Hudson 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Graham Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jacobs, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Palmer W. Jenkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis O. Johnson, Jr. 

Mrs. Gaylord Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard M. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Josey 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Judd 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard B. Keck 

Mr. and Mrs. William Keenan 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Kieschnick 

Mrs. George F. Kirby 

Mr. W. A. Kirkland 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffith Lawhon 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Lederer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Lederer 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Letzerich 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Levine 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Ley 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Ley 

Mr. and Mrs. Wendel D. Ley 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Liedtke 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Lloyd, Jr. 

Mrs. Mason G. Lockwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Loewenstern, Jr. 

Mrs. Otto J. Lottman 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Love 

Mrs. Ralph H. McCullough 

Mrs. R. Thomas McDermott 

Mr. Milton B. McGinty 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McLean 

Mrs. C. E. McWilliams 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Maginnis 

Mrs. Francis H. Maloney 

Mrs. Whitfield H. Marshall 

Mrs. John Mecom, Sr. 

Mrs. John S. Mellinger 

Mr. Frank W. Michaux 

Mr. Earl Douglas Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. George P. Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan M. Moody 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvin C. Moore, Sr. 

Mrs. Stanley C. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mosbacher 



RICE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 1 1 



Mr. and Mrs. James K. Nance 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard K. Neptune 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Ross Neuhaus 

Mrs. Vernon F. Neuhaus 

Mrs. W. Oscar Neuhaus 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. O'Connor 

Mr. Gustav M. O'Keiff 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ray Pace 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Peck 

Mrs. Charles A. Perlitz, Jr. 

Mrs. George A. Peterkin 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Pryor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Rambin 

Mrs. Eliza Lovett Randall 

Mr. and Mrs. Risher Randall 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Newton Rayzor, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Reckling III 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gregory Reilly 

Mrs. F. Fisher Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Hershel M. Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Riddell, Jr. 

Dr. Max F. Roy 

Mr. and Mr. Ellis Rudy 

Mrs. Patrick R. Rutherford, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Ryan 

Mr, and Mrs. Fred G. Sawtelle 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Schnitzer 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Scruggs 



Mrs. Eddy C. Scurlock 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Segall 

Mr. Thomas H. Shartle 

Mrs. James L. Shepherd, Jr. 

Mrs. John D. Simpson 

Mr. William A. Smith 

Mrs. Virginia Gibbs Smyth 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Stude 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Sudler 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Sumners 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Taft Symonds 

Mr. and Mrs. Williston B. Symonds 

Mr. Henry J. N. Taub 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. Thorstenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Wash Bryan Trammell 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Treadwell 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Underwood 

Mrs. Milton R. Underwood 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Van Wart 

Mrs. Joe Weingarten 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Welsh, Jr. 

Mrs. Roger M. Wheeler 

Mr. I. M. Wilford 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard O. Wilson 

Mrs. Wallace D. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace S. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Winters 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin N. Woodson 

Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Scott Ziegler 



Regular Members 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Abendshein Mr. and Mrs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford J. Alexander Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Allshouse Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur D. Alsobrook Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Anderson Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. William Spom Mr. and Mrs 

Arendale, Jr. Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. Fredric J. Attermeier Mr. and Mrs 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Randolph Bailey Mr. Robert J 

Mr. Stewart A. Baker/Ms. Julia C. Mr. and Mrs 

Louis Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Ballard Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Barksdale III Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Beamon Mr. and Mrs 

Col. and Mrs. Raymond C. Bishop Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton, Jr. Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Blumberg Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. Joe Brazzatti Mr. and Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin E. Brewer, Jr. Mr. and Mrs 



Raymond D. Brochstein 

Jack B. Buckley 

John D. Bums 

James W. Carroll 

Stephen C. Cook 

Joe Fred Crabb 

Andre Crispin 

Milton C. Cross 
. Cruikshank 

William E. Daniels 

Edward J. Davis 

Karl F. Doerner, Jr. 

Melvin A. Dow 

Walker J. Duffie 

C. Richard Everett 

Paul J. Evershade, Jr. 
. Paul Farren 
. Don E. Fizer 

Larry D. Floumoy 



12 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Ganchan 

Mr. and Mrs. David Kent Gibbs 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis J. Girard 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Henry Gissel, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melbern G. Glasscock 

Mr. E. Forbes Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. Matt Gorges 

Dr. J. John Gugenheim 

Mrs. John Hamman, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben C. Hayton 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex W. Head 

Mr. and Mrs. Neal B. Heaps 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Hendrix 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hermance 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin M. Herz, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mr. R. B. Hoover 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy W. Jackson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jackson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Jensen 

Mr. and Mrs. Raleigh W. Johnson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Daniel Jones 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Robert Jones 

Mr. James L. Ketelsen 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. King 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Kistler, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Fred Kongabel 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Lassiter 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Lawrence 

Mr. Hermon Lloyd 

Mr. Ellie W. Long, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel B. Lovejoy 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Malcolm Lovett, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Fred R. Lummis, Jr. 

Mr. James E. Lyon 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm T. McCants 

Mr. Joe A. McDermott, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. McFarland 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Mcintosh 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. McKittrick 

Mrs. Mary Hale Lovett McLean 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Walter McReynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Macey 

Mr. William S. Mackey, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Massey 

Mr. Robert R. Maxfield 

Mr. and Mrs. William James Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Peder Monsen 



Mr. and Mrs. Harvin C. Moore, Jr. 

Mr. Stewart Morris, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Carloss Morris, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Mott 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred F. Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy S. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Michael O'Neal 

Mr. and Mrs. Gwynne E. Old 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Oprea, Jr. 

Mr. William P. Pannill 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Powell 

Mr. and Mrs. Denton C. Priest, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Reasoner 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Reeder 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Reilly, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman T. Reynolds 

Mr. Morton L. Rich 

Mr. George A. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim A. Robinson 

Mrs. Evelyn Fink Rosenthal 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Rulfs, Sr. 

Miss Jane L. Rulfs 

Dr. and Mrs. George Rupp 

Mr. and Mrs. Patric Savage 

Mr. and Mrs. Gus A. Schill, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve J. Shaper 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Shelden 

Mr. and Mrs. William Shiffick 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted G. Shown 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard M. Siegler 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Smith 

Mrs. Lorena Steakley 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan C. Steiner 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Stone 

Dr. and Mrs. John R. Strawn 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh W. 

Thompson III 
Mr. and Mrs. John Z. Tomich 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Turpin 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe H. Tydlaska 
Mr. and Mrs. Ame Vennema 
Mr. James T. Wagoner 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Wainerdi 
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Walzel 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Waters 
Mr. James A. Whitson, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Williamson 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh T. Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Glenn Yeager 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Zumwalt, Jr. 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 1 3 

Instructional and Research Staff 



Emeritus Faculty 

Adams, John Allan Stewart, 1954-88. Professor of Geochemistry 

Ph.B. (1946), B.S. (1984). M.S. (1949), Ph.D. (1951) University of Chicago 
Austin, Walter J., 1960-87. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E. (1941) Rice Institute; M.S. (1946), Ph.D. (1949) University of Illinois 
Awapara, Jorge, 1957-94. Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry 

B.S. ( 1 94 1 ), M.S. ( 1 942) Michigan State University; Ph.D. ( 1 947) University of South- 
ern California 
Bale, Allen M., 21947-78. Athletic Director Emeritus 

B.S. ( 1 930) Rice Institute; M.A. ( 1 939) Columbia University 
Barker, J.R., 1949-86. Professor Emeritus of Health and Physical Education 

B.S. (1949) Rice Insthute; M.Ed. (1954) University of Texas 
Beckmann, Herbert W.K., 1957-85. Professor Emeritus of Mechanical 

Engineering 

Cand. Ing. ( 1 939), Dipl. Ing. ( 1 944), Dr. Ing. ( 1 957), Hanover University, Germany 
Bourgeois, Andre Marie Georges, 1928-72. Favrot Professor of French 

Bachelier en lettres ( 1 92 1 ), Bachelier en Droit ( 1 923), Certifie d'etudes superieuries de 

lettres ( 1 930) University of Paris, France; M.A. ( 1 934) University of Texas; Docteur de 

riuniversite (1945) University of Paris, France; Commandeur de I'Ordre des Palmes 

Academiques (1971) 
Brotzen, Franz Richard, 1 954-86. Stanley C. Moore Professor Emeritus of Materi- 
als Science 

B.S. ( 1 950), M.S. ( 1 953), Ph.D. ( 1 954) Case Institute of Technology 
Bryan, Andrew Bonnell, 1 957-68. Lecturer Emeritus in Physics 

B. A. (1918), M.A. (1920), Ph.D. (1922) Rice Institute 
Camden, Carroll, 1930-73. Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary Charter 

Associate of Hanszen College 

A.B. (1925) Centre College; Ph.D. (1930) University of Iowa 
Cason, Carolyn, 1956-74. Lecturer Emeritus in Dietetics 

B.S. (1934) University of Texas; M.A. (1939) Columbia University 
Clark, Howard Charles, 1966-88. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1959) University of Oklahoma; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (Stanford University) 
Class, Calvin M., 1952-85. Professor Emeritus of Physics 

A.B. ( 1 943), Ph.D. ( 1 95 1 ) Johns Hopkins University 
Curtis, Morton L., 1964-87. W.L. Moody, Jr. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

B.S. ( 1 943) Texas A&I University; Ph.D. (1951) University of Michigan 
Dowden, Wilfred Sellers, 1948-87. Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary 

Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1939), M.A. (1940) Vanderbih University; Ph.D. (1949) University of North 

Carolina 
Evans, Elinor Lucile, 1964-85. Albert K. and Harry W. Smith Professor Emeritus 

of Architecture 

B.A. (1938) Oklahoma State University; M.F.A. (1954) Yale University 
Fulton, James Street, 1 946-74. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Honorary 

Master of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 925), M.A. ( 1 929) Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. ( 1 934) Cornell University 



1 4 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Gordon, William E., 1955-85, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Space Physics 

and Astronomy and of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. (1939), M.A. (1942) Montclair State College; M.S. (1946), Ph.D. (1953) Cornell 

University 
Hackerman, Norman, 1970-85, President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor 

Emeritus of Chemistry 

A.B. ( 1 932), Ph.D. (1935) Johns Hopkins University 
Hake, Evelyn, 1932-74, Lecturer Emeritus in Biology 

B.A. ( 1 930), M.A. ( 1 932) Rice Institute 
Hale, Elton B,, 1963-79. Professor Emeritus of Accounting 

B.S. (1937), M.A. ( 1 940) Southwest Texas State Teachers College; Ph.D. ( 1 948) Univer- 
sity of Texas 
Hartsook, Arthur J., 1921-61. Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering 

A.B. (1911) Nebraska Weslayan University; B.S.Ch.E. ( 1 920), M.S. ( 1 92 1 ) Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology 
Higginbotham, Sanford Wilson, 1961-83. Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A. (1934) Rice Institute; M.A. (1941) Louisiana State University; Ph.D. (1949) 

University of Pennsylvania 
Hodges, Lee, 1 930-7 1 . Professor Emeritus of French 

B.S. (1930) Harvard University; M.A. (1934) Rice Institute 
Jitcoff, Andrew N., 1950-72. Professor Emeritus of Russian 

Bachelor ( 1 928), Master (1931) Prague Institute of Technology, Czechoslavia 
Kilpatrick, John E., 1 947-85. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and of Mathemati- 
cal Sciences 

B.A. (1940) Stephen F. Austin State University; A.M. (1942) University of Kansas; 

Ph.D. (1945) University of California, Berkeley 
Krzyzaniak, Marian, 1964-81. Professor Emeritus of Economics 

B.A. ( 1 932) University of Poznan, Poland; M.A. ( 1 954) University of Alberta, Canada; 

Ph.D. (1959) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Lecuyer, Maurice Antoine, 1962-79. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es lettres ( 1 937), Licence es lettres ( 1 943), Diplome d'etudes superieures 

( 1 944) Universite de Paris, France; Ph.D. ( 1 954) Yale University 
Manschreck, Clyde L., 1 983-86. Harry and Hazel Chavanne Professor Emeritus of 

Religious Studies 

B.A. ( 1 94 1 ) George Washington University; B.D. ( 1 944) Garrett Evangelical Seminary; 

M.A. (1944) Northwestern University; Ph.D. (1948) Yale University 
Morehead, James Caddell, Jrs. 1940-79. Professor Emeritus of Architecture and 

Honorary Associate of Baker College 

A.B. (1935) Princeton University; B.Arch. (1939) Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Nettleton, Lewis L., 1971-76. Lecturer Emeritus in Geology 

B.S. (1918) University of Idaho; M.S. ( 1 92 1 ), Ph.D. (1923) University of Wisconsin 
Norbeck, Edward, 1 960-8 1 . Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 948), M.A. ( 1 949), Ph.D. (1952) University of Michigan 
Norris, Mary, 1975-88. Professor of Music 

Artists Diploma in Piano (1939) Curtis Institute of Music 
Oliver, Covey., 1 979-8 1 . Radoslav A. Tsanoff Professor Emeritus of Public Affairs 

B.A. (1933), J.D. (1936) University of Texas; LL.M. (1953), S.J.D. (1954) Columbia 

University; LL.D. (1976) Southern Methodist University 
Oliver-Smith, Philip, 1969-82. Professor Emeritus of Art History 

B.A. (1937), M.A. (1950) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1969) New York 

University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 1 5 

Parsons, David G., 1 953-8 1 . Professor Emeritus of Art and Honorary Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.S. (1934), M.S. (1937) University of Wisconsin 
Phillips, Gerald C, 1949-88. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1944), M.A. (1947), Ph.D. (1949) Rice Institute 
Rachford, Henry H., Jr., 1964-82. Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1945), M.A. (1947) Rice Institute; Sc.D. (1950) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Ransom, Harry Steelsmith, Jr., 1954-81. Professor Emeritus of Architecture 

B.Arch. (1947 Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Arch. (1967) Texas A&M 

University 
Rath, R. John, 1963-80. Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B. ( 1 932) Kansas; M. A. ( 1 934) Berkeley; Ph.D. ( 1 94 1 ) Columbia University 
Richter, George H., 1931-74. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.A. ( 1 926), M.A. ( 1 927), Ph.D. ( 1 929) Rice Insthute 
Risser, J.R., 1 946-8 1 . Professor Emeritus of Physics 

A.B. (1931) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1935), Ph.D. (1938) Princeton 

University 
Rossini, Frederick D., 1971-75. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.S. (1925), M.S. (1926) Carnegie Institute; Ph.D. (1928) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Shelton, Fred Vernon, 1927-71. Professor Emeritus of French and Honorary 

Charter Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. ( 1 926), M.A. ( 1 928) Rice Institute; M.A. ( 1 942) University of Mexico; Docteur de 

I'universite ( 1 963) University of Paris, France 
Sims, James R., 1942-87. Herman and George R. Brown Professor Emeritus of 

Civil Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 94 1 ) Rice Institute; M.S. ( 1 950), Ph.D. (1956) University of Ilhnois 
Spears, Monroe Kirk, 1964-86. Libbie Shearn Moody Professor Emeritus of 

English 

A.B., A.M. (1937) University of South Carolina; Ph.D. (1940) Princeton University 
Storck, Roger L., 1966-85. Professor Emeritus of Biology 

B.S. (1945), M.S. (1946) Institute Fermentations-Meurice Chimie, Belgium; Ph.D. 

( 1 960) University of Illinois 
Thomas, Joe David, 1930-77. Professor Emeritus of English 

Ph.B. (1929), A.M. (1930) University of Chicago 
Thrall, Robert, 1969-84. Noah Harding Professor Emeritus of Mathematical 

Sciences and Professor Emeritus of Administrative Science 
Tipton, Alhert N., 1975-87. Professor Emeritus of Music 

Artists Diploma (1939) Curtis Institute; B.M. (1952) Washington University; M.M. 

( 1 953) St. Louis Institute of Music 
Topazio, Virgil William, 1965-83. Laurence H. Favrot Professor of French 

B.A. ( 1 943) Weslayan College; M.A. ( 1 947), Ph.D. (1951) Columbia University 
Wadsworth, Philip A., 1964-73. Professor Emeritus of French 

A.B. (1935), Ph.D. (1939) Yale University 
Wall, Frederick T., 1972-79. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.C. ( 1 933), Ph.D. (1937) University of Minnesota 
Wann, T.W., 1962-79. Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

B.A. (1937), Ph.D. (1949) University of California, Berkeley 



1 6 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Wilhoit, James Cammack, Jr., 1954-81. Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Mathematical Sciences 

B.S.M.E. (1948) Rice Institute; M.S. (1951) Texas A&M University; Ph.D. (1954) 
Stanford University 

Williams, George Guion, 1924-68. Professor Emeritus of English 
B. A. (1923), M.A. (1925) Rice Institute 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 1 7 

Instructional and Research Staff 

Aazhang, Behnaam, 1985. Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. (1981), M.S. (1983), Ph.D. (1986) University oflUinois 
Addison, Anthony, 1984. Artist Teacher of Opera, Director of Opera 
Akers, William Walter, 1 947. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing and Vice President for Administration 

B.S. ( 1 943) Texas Technological College; M.S. ( 1 944) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 950) 

University of Michigan 
Akin, John Edward, 1983. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical 

Sciences 

B.S. (1964) Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; M.S. (1966) Tennessee Technological 

University; Ph.D. (1968) Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
Alcover, Madeleine, 1975. Professor of French 

Licence de lettres moderne ( 1 962), Diplome de'etudes superieures ( 1 963), Doctorat de 

3' cycle (1965) France 
Alford, John, 1985. Associate Professor of Political Sciences and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.S. (1975), M.A. (1977) Univ. of Houston; M.A. (1980), Ph.D. (1981) University of 

Iowa 
Alfrey, Clarence P., Jr., 1968. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering 

Laboratory 

B.A. (1951) Rice Institute; M.D. (1955) Baylor College of Medicine; Ph.D. (1966) 

University of Minnesota 
Almes, Guy T., 1985. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. ( 1 972), M.E.E. ( 1 972) Rice University; Ph.D. ( 1 980) Carnegie-Mellon University 
Ambler, John S., 1964. Professor of Political Science and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.A. (1953) Willamette University; M.A. (1954) Stanford University; Certificat 

d'etudes politiques (1955) University of Bordeaux, France; Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of 

California, Berkeley 
Anderson, James E., 1983. Visiting Professor of Political Science 

B.S. (1955) Southwest Texas State University; Ph.D. (1959) University of Texas 
Anderson, John B., 1975. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1968) University of South Alabama; M.S. (1970) University of New Mexico; 

Ph.D. (1972) Florida State University 
Andrews, John F., 1982. Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.S.C.E. (1951), M.S. (1954) University of Arkansas; Ph.D. (1964) University of 

California, Berkeley 
Angel, Yves C, 1984. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associ- 
ate of Brown College 

B.S. (1976) Ecole Centrale De Lyon, France; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1980) University of 

California, Berkeley 
Antoulas, Athanasios C, 1985. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

Dip. in Electrical Engineering (1975), Dip. in Mathematics (1975) Ph.D. (1980) ETH 

Zurich 
Apple, Max L, 1971. Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English 

B.A. (1963) University of Michigan; M.A. (1965) Stanford University; Ph.D. (1970) 

University of Michigan 



1 8 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Arad, Atar, 1 987. Professor of Viola in the Shepherd School of Music 

Artist Diploma ( 1 966) The Israely Academy of Music; Diploma (1971) Chapelle 

Musicale de la Reine Elisabeth, Brussels; Diploma Superieur (1972) Brussels 

Conservatory. 
Arbiter, Eric A., 1977. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E. (1972) Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.Mus. (1973) Cleveland Institute of 

Music 
Aresu, Bernard, 1977. Associate Professor of French and Master of Brown College 

Licence es lettres ( 1 967) Universite de Montpellier, France; Ph.D. ( 1 975) University of 

Washington 
Armeniades, Constantine D., 1 969. Professor in the Department of Chemical 

Engineering and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. (1961) Northeastern University; M.S. (1967) Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D. 

(1969) Case Western Reserve University 
Atherholt, Robert, 1 984. Artist Teacher, Oboe 

B.Mus. ( 1 976), M.Mus. (1977) Juilliard School of Music 
Atkinson, E. Neely, 1985. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. ( 1 975), M.A., Ph.D. (1981) Rice University 
Austin, Joe Dan, 1978. Associate Professor of Education and Mathematical Sci- 
ences and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. in Applied Mathematics (1966) Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S. in Mathe- 
matical Statistics (1968), Ph.D. in Mathematics Education (1972) Purdue University 
Ave Lallemant, Hans G., 1970. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.Sc. (1960), M.Sc. (1964), Ph.D. (1967) Leiden University, Netherlands 
Babikian, Virginia, 1982. Professor of Voice 

B.Mus. (1951), M.Mus. (1952) Westminster Choir College; Artist's Diploma (1957), 

Diploma (1956) Universita per stranieri, Perugia, Italy 
Bacon, Thomas, 1987. Artist Teacher, Horn 

B.S. (1975) Oakland University 
Bailar, Benjamin F., 1 987. Dean of Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administra- 
tion, Professor of Administration, and Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1955) University of Colorado; M.B.A. (1959) Harvard Graduate School of 

Business Administration 
Bailey, Toby N., 1985. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.A. (1981) Cambridge University, England; Ph.D. (1982) Oxford University, 

England 
Bailey, Walter B, 1982. Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1976) Lewis and Clark College; M.A. (1979), Ph.D. (1982) University of 

Southern California 
Baker, Donald Roy, 1966. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and Honorary 

Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (1950) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1955) Princeton University 
Baker, Lovett, 1986. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

A.B. (1952) Princeton University 
Baker, Stephen D., 1963. Professor of Physics and Honorary Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.S. (1957) Duke University; M.S. ( 1 959), Ph.D. ( 1 963) Yale University 
Bally, Albert W., 1981. Harry Carothers Wiess Professor of Geology 

Ph.D. (1953) University of Zurich, Switzerland 
Barnes, Mary W., 1 983. Assistant Professor of Art and Associate of Lovett College 

B.F.A. (1971) Drake University; M.F.A. (1976) University of Arizona 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 1 9 

Barry, David, 1987. Lecturer on German 

B.A. ( 1 977) Pembroke College; M.A. ( 1 978), Ph.D. ( 1 983) Queen's University, Canada 
Batsell, Richard R., 1 980. Associate Professor of Administrative Science and 

Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A., B.B.A. (1971), Ph.D. (1976)University of Texas 
Bavinger, Bill Allen, 1977. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1973), M.Arch. (1976) Rice University 
Bayazitoglu, Yildiz, 1977. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. ( 1 967) Middle East Technological University; M.S. ( 1 969), Ph.D. ( 1 974) Universi- 
ty of Michigan 
Bearden, Frank W., 1954. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1947) Texas Technological College; M.A. (1949), Ed.D. (1954) Columbia 

University 
Beckingham, Kathleen, 1980. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1972) Cambridge University, England 
Bedient, Philip B., 1975. Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 969), M.S. ( 1 972), Ph.D. (1975) University of Florida 
Bell, Philip W., 1978. William Alexander Kirkland Professor of Administrative 

Science and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1947) Princeton University; M.A. (1949) University of California, Berkeley; 

Ph.D. (1954) Princeton University 
Benjamin, Don C, Jr., 1978. Lecturer in Religious Studies and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1964) St. Bonaventure University; M.A. (1968) Catholic University of America; 

Ph.D. (1981) Claremont Graduate School 
Bennett, George N., 1978. Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.S. (1968) University of Nebraska; Ph.D. (1974) Purdue University 
Bennett, John K., 1 988. Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing and Associate of Wiess College 

B.S.E.E. ( 1 973), M.E.E. ( 1 974) Rice University; M.S. ( 1 983), Ph.D. ( 1 987) 

University of Washington 
Berget, Susan M., 1978. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1969), M.S. (1971) Southern Illinois University; Ph.D. (1974) University of 

Minnesota 
Berry, Michael J., 1980. Robert A. Welch Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1967) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1970) University of California, Berkeley 
Bible, Frances L.,1975. Artist in Residence, Voice 

Artists Diploma in Singing ( 1 942), Graduate Diploma in Voice ( 1 947) Juilliard School 

of Music 
Bickers, Kenneth N., 1987 Assistant Professor of Political Science and Resident 

Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1981) Texas Christian University; M.A. (1983) University of Wisconsin- 
Madison 
Billups, W. Edward, 1970. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1961), M.S. (1965) Marshall University; Ph.D. (1970) Pennsylvania State 

University 
Bixby, Robert E., 1984. Professor of Mathematical Sciences, Administrative Sci- 
ence, and Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (1968) University of California; M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 



20 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Blackburn, James B., 1975. Lecturer on Architecture and Environmental Science 

B.A. ( 1 969), J.D. ( 1 972) University of Texas; M.S. ( 1 974) Rice University 
Blair, Edward A., 1988. Visiting Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. ( 1 973), Ph.D. ( 1 978) University of Illinois 
Bland, Robert L., 1954. Associate Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

Central Washington State College; M.A. (1954) Columbia University 
Blumberg, Mitchell, 1981. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science 

A.B. (1965), J.D. (1968) University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A. (1973) Harvard 

University 
Boehm, Hans-Juergen, 1985. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S. ( 1 978) University of Washington; M.S. ( 1 980), Ph.D. ( 1 984) Cornell University 
Boles, John B., 1981. Professor of History and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 965) Rice University; Ph.D. ( 1 969) University of Virginia 
Bonner, Billy E., 1 985. Professor of Physics and Director of T. W. Bonner Nuclear 

Laboratories 

B.S. (1961) Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; M.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1965) Rice University 
Bordelon, Cassius B., Jr., 1972. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

Physical Education 

B.S. (1964) Louisiana State University; Ph.D. (1972) Baylor College of Medicine 
Boshernitzan, Michael, 1982. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. (1971) Moscow University, U.S.S.R.; M.A. (1974) Hebrew University, Israel; 

Ph.D. (1981) Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel 
Boterf, Chester Arthur, 1973. Associate Professor of Art 

B.A. ( 1 959) Kansas University; M.F.A. ( 1 965) Columbia University 
Bougen, Philip D., 1988. Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.A. ( 1 977). M.Phil. ( 1 980) Huddersfield Polytechnic, England; Ph.D. ( 1 987) Universi- 
ty of London 
Bourland, Hardy. M., 1961. Lecturer in Electrical and Computer Engineering, 

Director of Rice Engineering Design and Development Institute, Assistant 

Dean of Engineering for Student Development, and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.S. (1955) Texas Technological College; S.M.E.E. (1957) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Boyd, E. Andrew, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences and Associ- 
ate of Brown College 

A.B. (1981) Oberlin College; Ph.D. ( 1 987) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Boyd, Harold B., 1979. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemical 

Engineering 

B.A. (1959) Drexel University; M.Ch.E. (1962) New York University 
Brady, Patrick, 1972. Lawrence H. Favrot Professor of French 

B. A. ( 1 956) University of Sydney, Australia; Doctorat de PUniversite ( 1 960) Sorbonne, 

France 
Brelsford, John W., Jr., 1 970. Professor of Psychology and Master of Jones College 

B.A. ( 1 960). M. A. ( 1 96 1 ) Texas Christian University; Ph.D. ( 1 965) University of Texas 
Bridges, Eileen, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and Associ- 
ate of Sid Richardson College 

B.S. (1977) California Institute of Technology; M.E.E. ( 1 978) Rice University; M.B.A. 

(1982) University of Santa Clara; Ph.D. (1987) Northwestern University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 2 1 

Briggs, Faye, 1982. Adjunct Associate Professor of Computer Science in the 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.S.E.E. (1971) Ahmedu Bello University, Nigeria; M.A. ( 1 974) Stanford University; 

Ph.D. (1977) University of Illinois 
Brito, Dagobert L. 1 984. George A. Peterkin Professor of Political Economy and 

Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1967), M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1970) Rice University 
Brody, Baruch, 1975. Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1962) Brooklyn College; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1967) Princeton University 
Broker, Karin L., 1 980. Associate Professor of Art and Associate of Lovett College 

B.F.A. (1972) University oflowa; M.F.A. (1980) University of Wisconsin 
Brooks, Philip R., 1964. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. ( 1 960) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. ( 1 964) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Brooks, Wayne, 1985. Artist Teacher, Viola 

Diploma ( 1 977) Curtis Institute of Music 
Brown, Arthur M., 1985. Adjunct Professor of Biology 

M.D. (1956) University of Manitoba, Canada; Ph.D. (1964) University of London, 

England 
Brown, Barry W., 1970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.S.( 1959) University of Chicago; M.S. ( 1 96 1 ), Ph.D. ( 1 963) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Brown, Bryan W., 1983. Associate Professor of Economics and Statistics and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1969), M.A. (1972) Texas Tech University; Ph.D. (1977) University of 

Pennsylvania 
Brown, Katherine Tsanoff, 1 963. Professor of Art History and Honorary Associate 

ofWill Rice College 

B.A. (1938) Rice Institute; M.F.A. (1940) Cornell University 
Brown, Peter Thomson, 1978. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History and 

Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1971), M.F.A. (1977) Stanford University 
Brown, Richard, 1984. Assistant Professor of Percussion 

B.M.E. (1969) Temple University; M.Mus. (1971) Catholic University of America 
Bryan, William J., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.A. (1971) Johns Hopkins University; M.D. (1975) Baylor College of Medicine 
Bryant, John, 1981. Henry S. Fox Sr. Professor of Economics, Professor of 

Administrative Science and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1969)Oberlin College; M.S. (1973), Ph.D. (1975) Carnegie-Mellon University 
Buffler, Richard T., 1984. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1959) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1967) University of California, Berkeley 
Burgess, Kevin, 1 986. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Will Rice 

College 

B.Sc. (1979) University of Bath, England; M.Sc. (1980) University of East Anglia, 

England; Ph.D. (1983) University of Cambridge, England 
Burke, Kevin, C. A., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.Sc. (1951), Ph.D. (1953) University of London, England 



22 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Burnett, Sarah A., 1972. Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.S. ( 1 966) Memphis State University; M.S. ( 1 970), Ph.D. ( 1 972) Tulane University 
Burnside, Mary A., 1 986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. ( 1 972) Rice University; M.A. ( 1 976), Ph.D. ( 1 980) University of Houston 
Burrus, C. Sidney, 1 965. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Hon- 
orary Associate of Will Rice College and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A., B.S.E.E. (1958) Rice Institute; M.S. (1960) Rice University; Ph.D. (1965) Stan- 
ford University 
Burt, George, 1985. Associate Professor of Theory and Composition 

B.A. (1955) University of California, Berkeley; M.A. (1958) Mills College M.F.A. 

(1962) Princeton University 
Butler, James E., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.S. ( 1 956) University of the South; M.A. ( 1 957) Southwest Texas State College; M.D. 

(1962) University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 
Caballero, William, 1985. Artist Teacher, Horn 

B.Mus. (1982) New England Conservatory of Music 
Caflisch, Anna B., 1983. Lecturer on Italian 

Liceo Classico J. Stellini, Udine, Italy; Docttore in Lettere (1958) Universita del Sacro 

Cuore, Milan, Italy 
Camfield, William A., 1 969. Joseph and Joanna Nazro Mullen Professor of Art 

History and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1957) Princeton University; M.A. (1961), Ph.D. (1964) Yale University 
Campbell, James Wayne, 1959. Professor of Biology 

B.S. (1953) Southwest Missouri State University; M.S. (1955) University of Illinois; 

Ph.D. (1958) University of Oklahoma 
Cannady, William Tillman, 1964. Professor of Architecture 

B. Arch. ( 1 96 1 ) University of California, Berkeley; M.Arch. ( 1 962) Harvard University 
Cardus, David, 1970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A., B.Sc. (1942) University of Montpellier, France; M.D. (1949) Barcelona Medical 

School, Spain 
Carnahan, Norman F., 1986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical 

Engineering 

B.SChE ( 1 965) University of Houston; Ph.D. (1971) University of Oklahoma. 
Carrington, Samuel M., Jr., 1 967. Professor of French, University Librarian, and 

University Associate of Jones College. 

A.B. ( 1 960), M.A. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 965) University of North Carolina 
Carroll, Michael M., 1988. Burton J. and Ann M. McMurtry Professor of Engi- 
neering and Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering 

B.A. ( 1 958), M.A. ( 1 959) University College Galway; Ph.D. ( 1 964) Brown University 
Cartwright, Robert S., Jr., 1980. Professor of Computer Science and Associate 

of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1971) Harvard College, M.A. ( 1 973), Ph.D. ( 1 973) Stanford University 
Casbarian, John Joseph, 1 973. Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1969) Rice University, M.F.A. (1971) California Institute of the Arts, B.Arch. 

(1972) Rice University 
Castaneda, James A., 1 96 1 . Professor of Spanish and Honorary Master of Will 

Rice College and Golf Coach 

B.A. (1954) Drew University, M.A. (1955), Ph.D. (1958) Yale University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 23 

Chae, Suchan, 1 985. Assistant Professor of Economics and Statistics 

B.S. ( 1 978) Seoul National University; M.S. ( 1 980) Jeonbuk National University; 

Ph.D. ( 1 985) University of Pennsylvania 
Chaisson, William, 1983. Artist Teacher of Music, Piano 

B.Mus. (1952) Houston Conservatory of Music 
Chamberlain, Joseph W., 1971. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

A.B. ( 1 948), A.M. ( 1 949) University of Missouri; M.S. (1951), Ph.D. ( 1 952) University 

of Michigan 
Chance, Jane, 1973. Professor of English and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 967) Purdue University; M.A. ( 1 968), Ph.D. (1971) University of Illinois 
Chang, Donald C, 1 970. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biophysics in the Depart- 
ment of Physics 

B.S. ( 1 965) National Taiwan University; M.A. ( 1 967), Ph.D. ( 1 970) Rice University 
Chang, Sheldon Xu-Dong, 1988. Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1982) Fudan University; Ph.D. (1986) Princeton University 
Chapman, Alan Jesse, 1946. Harry S. Cameron Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 

B.S.M.E. (1945) Rice Institute; M.S. (1949) University of Colorado; Ph.D. (1953) 

University of Illinois 
Cheatham, John Bane, Jr., 1963. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 948), M.S. (1953) Southern Methodist University; Ph.D. ( 1 960) Rice University 
Chen, Chuanchang, 1988. Visiting Professor of English 

1959 Beijing Institute of Foreign Languages 
Chen, Lilly C.H., 1981. Instructor in Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1961) National Taiwan University; M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1974) University of 

Illinois 
Chiu, Shean-Tsong, 1984. Assistant Professor of Statistics 

B.S. (1977) National Tsing-Hua University, Hisuchu, Taiwan; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. 

(1984) University of California, Berkeley 
Choe, Jaigyoung, 1988. G. C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S. ( 1 977) Seoul National University; Ph.D. (1987) University of California-Berkeley 
Citron, Marcia J., 1976. Associate Professor of Music and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.A. ( 1 966) Brooklyn College; M.A. ( 1 970), Ph.D. ( 1 97 1 ) University of North Carolina 
Ciufolini, Marco A., 1984. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Associate of 

Wiess College 

B.S. ( 1 978) Spring Hill College; Ph.D. (1981) University of Michigan 
Clark, John W., Jr., 1968. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.S. (1962) Christian Brothers College; M.S. (1965), Ph.D. (1967) Case Western Re- 
serve University 
Clark, Susan L., 1973. Professor of German and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1969) Mount Union College; M.Phil. (1972), Ph.D. (1973) Rutgers University 
Clayton, Donald D., 1963. Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics in 

the Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics and Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 

B.S. (1956) Southern Methodist University; M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1962) California 

Institute of Technology 
Cloutier, Paul A., 1967. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1964) University of Southwestern Louisiana; Ph.D. (1967) Rice University 



24 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Cohen, Ruben D., 1 985. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Asso- 
ciate of Wiess College 

B.M.E. ( 1 978) Concordia University, Montreal; M.S.M.E. ( 1 979) University of Massa- 
chusetts, Amherst; Ph.D. (1985) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Colaco, Joseph P., 1975. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1960) University of Bombay, India; M.S. (1962), Ph.D. (1965) University of 

Illinois 
Connelly, Brian, 1 984. Artist Teacher, Piano Accompaniment and Vocal Coach 

B.Mus. (1980), M.Mus. (1983) University of Michigan 
Cooke, Nancy M., 1987. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Associate of Will 

Rice College 

B.A. (1981) George Mason University; M.A. (1983) Ph.D. (1987) New Mexico State 

University 
Cooper, Bruce F,, 1986. Lecturer on Biochemistry 

B.A. ( 1 978) Kent State; Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Cooper, Joseph, 1967. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Social Sciences and Profes- 
sor of Administrative Science 

A.B. (1955), M.A. (1959), Ph.D. (1961) Harvard University 
Cooper, Paul, 1974. Lynette S. Autrey Professor in Music and Composer-in- 

Residence 

B.Mus., B.A. ( 1 950), M.A. (1953), D.M.A. (1956) University of Southern California 
Copeland, James E., 1 966. Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics and Associate of 

Baker College 

B.A. (1961) University of Colorado; Ph.D. (1965) Cornell University 
Corcoran, Marjorie D., 1980. Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of 

Baker College 

B.S. ( 1 972) University of Dayton; Ph.D. (1977) Indiana University 
Cox, Steve J., 1988. Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. ( 1 982), M.S. ( 1 983) Marquette University 
Crowell, Steven G., 1983. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

A.B. ( 1 974) University of California, Santa Cruz; M.A. ( 1 976) Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. (1981) Yale University 
Cunningham, Robert A., 1 986. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and Materials 

Science 

A.A. ( 1 943) Schriner Institute; B.S.M.E. ( 1 949), M.S.M.E. (1955) Rice Institute 
Cunningham, R. George, 1979. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1952) University of Texas 
Curl, Robert F., Jr., 1 958. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1954) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1957) University of California, Berkeley 
Curtis, Doris M., 1 980. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. (1933) Brooklyn College; M. A. ( 1 934), Ph.D. ( 1 949) Columbia University 
Cuthbertson, Gilbert Morris, 1963. Professor of Political Science and Resident 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1959) University of Kansas; Ph.D. (1963) Harvard University 
Cyprus, Joel H., 1965. Lecturer in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.A., B.S.E.E. (1959) Rice Institute; M.S. (1961), Ph.D. (1963) Rice University 
Daichman, Graciela S., 1973. Lecturer on Spanish and Associate of Baker College 

Profesorado ( 1 958) Instituto Nacional del Profesorado en Lenguas Vivas; M.A. ( 1 975), 

Ph.D.(1983) Rice University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 25 

Dakoulas, Panajiotis (Panos) Christos, 1987. Assistant Professor in Civil 

Engineering 

Dipoloma (1980) National Technical University of Athens, Greece; M.Sc. (1982), 

Ph.D. ( 1 985) Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Davezac, Bertrand M., 1 979. Visiting Lecturer on Art History and Curator of the 

Institute for the Arts 

B.A. ( 1 957), Ph.D. (1971) Columbia University 
Davidson, Chandler, 1966. Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (1961) University of Texas; M. A. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) Princeton University 
Davis, Kathleen A., 1 984. Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1977) California State Polytechnic University; M. A. ( 1 979), Ph.D. ( 1 982) Univer- 
sity of Southern California at Los Angeles 
Davis, Philip W., 1969. Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics 

B.A. (1961) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 965) Cornell 
Davis, Sam H., Jr., 1957. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, 

Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Master of Mary Gibbs Jones College 

B.A. (1952), B.S. (1953) Rice Institute; ScD. (1957) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
De Bremaecker, Jean-Claude, 1959. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and 

Associate of Jones College 

Ingenieur Civil des Mines ( 1 948) University of Louvain, Belgium; M.S. ( 1 950) Louisi- 
ana State University; Ph.D. (1952) University of California. Berkeley 
de Figueiredo, Rui J.P., 1965. Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering and Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

S.B. ( 1 950)., S.M. ( 1 952) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D. ( 1959) Harvard 

University 
Dennis, John E., 1979. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. ( 1 962), M.S. ( 1 964) University of Miami; Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of Utah 
Dessler, Alexander J., 1963. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and 

Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. ( 1 952) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. ( 1 956) Duke University 
D'Evelyn, Mark P., 1986. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1977) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1982) University of Chicago 
DeWitt, John Adams, 1982. Lecturer on Music, Trumpet 

B.M. (1973) Northwestern University 
Dharan, Bala G., 1 982. Associate Professor of Accounting and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.Tech. ( 1 973) Indian Institute of Technology, India; M.B.A. ( 1 975) Indian Institute of 

Management, India; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1981) Carnegie-Mellon University 
Diddel, Roberta M., 1985. Adjunct Instructor of Psychology 

B.A. (1976) Wesleyan University; Ph.D. (1985) Boston University 
Dipboye, Robert, 1978. Professor of Psychology and Administrative Science and 

Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. ( 1 968) Baylor University; M.S. ( 1 969), Ph.D. ( 1 973) Purdue University 
Disch, James G., 1973. Associate Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences and Master of Sid Richardson College 

B.S. (1969), M.Ed. (1970) University of Houston; P.E.D. (1973) Indiana University 
Dix, Robert H., 1968. Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and 

Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1951), M.A. (1953), Ph.D. (1962) Harvard University 



26 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Dobbins, Stella Maggio, 1988. Lecturer on Art and Art History and Director of 

Sewall Art Gallery 

B. A. ( 1 964) University of Illinois; M. A. ( 1 982) University of Houston-Clear Lake 
Dodds, Stanley A., 1977. Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.S. ( 1 968) Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D. ( 1 975) Cornell University 
Doody, Terrence Arthur, 1 970. Professor of English and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1965) Providence College; M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1970) Cornell University 
Doughtie, Edward Orth, 1963. Professor of English, Associate of Lovett College 

and Master of Will Rice College 

A.B. ( 1 958) Duke University; A.M. ( 1 960), Ph.D. ( 1 964) Harvard University 
Downey, James P., 1986. Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Visiting Assistant Professor of 

Naval Science 

B.A. ( 1 978) University of Texas, El Paso 
Downs, Thomas D., 1 97 1 . Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.S. ( 1 960) Western Michigan University; M.P.H. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 965) University of 

Michigan 
Dravis, Jeffrey J., 1 987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1971) St. Mary's University; M.S. (1977) University of Miami, Florida; Ph.D. 

(1980) Rice University 
Drew, Katherine Fischer, 1950. Lynette S. Autrey Professor of History and Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 944), M. A. ( 1 945) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1950) Cornell University 
Driskill, Linda P., 1970. Associate Professor of English and Administrative Sci- 
ence and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1961), M.A. ( 1 968), Ph.D. ( 1 970) Rice University 
Droxler, Andre W,, 1987. Assistant Professor of Geology and Geophysics and 

Resident Associate of Hanszen College 

Diploma (1978) University of Neuchatel, Switzerland; Ph.D. (1984) University of 

Miami, Florida 
Duck, Ian M., 1 963. Professor of Physics 

B.S. (1955) Queen's University, Canada; Ph.D. (1961) California Institute of 

Technology 
Dufour, Reginald J., 1 975. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associ- 
ate of Brown College 

B.S. (1970) Louisiana State University; M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1974) Uniiversity of 

Wisconsin 
Duke, Reese Dale, 1 966. Lecturer on Education and Director of Student Teaching 

B.S. (1950) Ouachita Baptist College; M.Ed. (1954), Ph.D. (1966) University of Texas 
Dunbar, Robert B., 1981. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics and 

Resident Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1975) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1981) University of California, San Diego 
Dunlap. William J., 1980. Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science 

B.F.T. ( 1 952) Texas A&M University; Ph.D. (1961) University of Oklahoma 
Dunne, Carrin, 1975. Lecturer on Religious Studies 

B.A. (1955) University of St. Thomas; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1970) University of Notre 

Dame 
Dunning, F. Barry, 1972. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and Astronomy 

and Associate of Jones College 

B.Sc. ( 1 966), Ph.D. ( 1 969) University College, London, England 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 27 

Durrani, Ahmad J., 1 982. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate 
of Jones College 

B.S.C.E. ( 1 968) Engineering University, Pakistan; M.S. ( 1 975) Asian Institute of Tech- 
nology, Thailand; Ph.D. (1982) University of Michigan 

Dye, Ken, 1983. Lecturer on Music; Director, Marching Owl Band 

B.Mus. ( 1 974) University of Southern California; M. A. ( 1 980) California State Univer- 
sity, Long Beach; D.Ed. ( 1 983) University of Houston 

Dyson, Derek C, 1 966. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and 
Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1955) University of Cambridge, England; Ph.D. (1966) University of London, 

England 
Eaker, Helen Lanneau, 1 964. Lecturer on Classics 

B.A. ( 1 944), Ph.D. ( 1 955) University of North Carolina 
Eggert, Allen W. 1968. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 

(1963) Rice University; M.A. (1967) California Western University 
Eifler, Margret, 1973. Professor of German and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1962), M.A. (1964), Ph.D. (1969) University of California, Berkeley 
Eisner, Elmer, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. ( 1 939) Brooklyn College; Ph.D. ( 1 943) The John Hopkins University 
Ellis, Grover, 1 986. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.S. (1942) University of Oklahoma; M. B.A. (1947) Harvard University 
Ellison, Paul V.H., 1975. Professor of Music 

B.M.E. ( 1 965) Eastern New Mexico University; M.M. ( 1 966) Northwestern University 
Engel, Paul S., 1970. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1964) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1968) Harvard University 
Engelhardt, Tristram Hugo, Jr., 1982. Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. ( 1 963), Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of Texas; M.D. ( 1 972) Tulane School of Medicine 
Ensor, Katherine Bennett, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Statistics and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.S.E. (1981), M.S. (1982) Arkansas State University; Ph.D. (1986) Texas A&M 

University 
Eskin, Suzanne G., 1982. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

B.A. (1962), M.A. (1964) Rice University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Texas 
Estle, Thomas L., 1967. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1953) Rice Institute; M.S. (1954), Ph.D. (1957) University of Illinois 
Etnyre, Bruce R., 1984. Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1 973) Valparaiso University; M.S. (1977) Purdue University; Ph.D. ( 1 984) Uni- 
versity of Texas at Austin 
Farrell, Michele Longino, 1984. Assistant Professor of French and Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.A. (1968) Rosary College; M.A. (1974) Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D. (1984) 

University of Michigan 
Felleisen, Matthias, 1987. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

M.S. (1981)TheUniversity of Arizona; Ph.D. (1987) Indiana University 
Few, Arthur A., 1970. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Environ- 
mental Science and Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (1962) Southwestern University; M.B.S. (1965) University of Colorado; Ph.D. 

(1969) Rice University 
Fischer, Michael M. J., 1 98 1 . Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1967) Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. (1973) University of Chicago 



28 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Fisher, Frank M., Jr., 1963. Professor of Biology and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1953) Hanover College; M.S. (1958). Ph.D. (1961) Purdue University 
Fisher, G. D., 1973. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemical 

Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 957) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 965) Johns Hopkins University 
Fishman, Talya, 1988. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (1976) Wesleyan University; M.A. (1979) Jewish Theological Seminary of 

America; Ph.D. (1986) Harvard University 
Flatt, Robert N., 1987. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1969), M.E.E. (1970) Rice University; M. B.A. (1973) Harvard University 
Fliegel, Raphael N., 1975. Professor of Music and Associate of Hanszen College 
Ford, Wally, 1982. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1975), M.C.E. (1976) Rice University 
Forman, Robin, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.A. ( 1 98 1 ), M. A. ( 1 98 1 ) University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. ( 1 985) Harvard University 
Frankowski, Ralph F., 1970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.S. ( 1 957), M.S. ( 1 959) DePaul University; M.P.H. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 967) University of 

Michigan 
Fred, Herbert L., M.D., 1974. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and 

Health Sciences 

B.A. (1950) Rice Institute; M.D. (1954) Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 
Freeman, John W„ 1 964. Lecturer on Religious Studies 

B.S. (1957), M.S. (1961), Ph.D. (1963) University of Iowa 
Freeman, Thomas F., 1972. Lecturer on Religious Studies 

A.B. (1939) Virginia Union University; B.D. (1942) Andover Newton Theological 

School; Ph.D. (1948) University of Chicago 
Friday, A. Randall, 1 980. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.B.A. (1973) University of Iowa; J.D.( 1 976) Stanford University 
Fukuyama, Tohru, 1 978. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1971), M.A. ( 1 973) Nagoya University, Japan; Ph.D. ( 1 977) Harvard University 
Gallop, Jane, 1985. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Humanities 

B.A. ( 1 972), Ph.D. ( 1 976) Cornell University 
Gao, Zhiyong, 1986. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. Fudan University (197?); Ph.D. (1984) State University of New York at Stony 

Brook 
Garcia, Charles Albert, 1974. Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

A.A. (1965) University of Florida; M.D. ( 1 969) Tulane Medical School 
Garrity, Thomas, 1986. G. C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics and Associate of 

Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1981) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 986) Brown University 
Gaugler, Barbara B., 1987. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S. ( 1 978) St. Lawrence University; M.S. (1981) Ohio University 
Gehan, Fdmund A., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1951) Manhattan University; M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1957) North Carolina State 

University 
Gentle, James E., 1 98 1 . Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1966) University of North Carolina; M.A. (1969) Louisiana State University; 

M.C.S. ( 1 973), Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of Texas 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 29 

Gibson, Kathleen R., 1981. Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 963) University of Michigan; M.A. ( 1 969), Ph.D. ( 1 970) University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley 
Giles, Wayne Rodney, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

Ba.Sc. (1969), M.Sc. (1970) University of Alberta; M.Phil(1971), Ph.D. (1974) Yale 

University 
Gillan, Douglas J., 1988. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. ( 1 974) Macalester College; Ph.D. ( 1 978) University of Texas 
Glacken, Michael W., (1987). Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 980) University of Maryland; Ph.D. ( 1 986) MIT 
Glantz, Raymon M., 1969. Professor of Biology 

B.A. ( 1 963) Brooklyn College; M.S. ( 1 964), Ph.D. ( 1 966) Syracuse University 
Glanville, James W., 1 986. Professor of Finance and Vice-President for Financial 

Affairs and Treasurer of the University 

B.S. (1944) Rice University; M.S. (1946), Professional Degree of Chemical Engineer 

(1958) California Institute of Technology 
Glass, Graham P., 1967. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1960) Birmingham University, England; Ph.D. (1963) Cambridge University, 

England 
Glowinski, Roland, 1986. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

Ph.D. ( 1 970) University of Paris 
Goldsberry, Betty S. 1 988. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1965) Central State University; M.A. (1978) Framingham State College; Ph.D. 

(1984) Rice University 
Gomer, Richard H., 1988. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A. (1977) Pomona College; Ph.D. (1983) California Institute of Technology 
Gordon, Chad, 1970. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1957), M.A. (1962), Ph.D. (1963) University of California, Los Angeles 
Gorry, G. Anthony, 1976. Adjunct Professor of Computer Science 

B.E. (1962) Yale University; M.S. (1963) University of California-Berkeley; Ph.D. 

(1967)M.I.T. 
Gosain, Narendra K., 1981. Lecturer in Civil Engineering 

B.A. (1963) University of Rajasthan, India; M.A. (1965) University of Roorkee, India; 

Ph.D. (1973) Rice University 
Gottschalk, Arthur W,, 1977. Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1974), M.A. (1975), D.M.A. (1978) University of Michigan 
Gow, Robert H., 1987. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1955) Yale University 
Grandy, Richard E., 1980. Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics 

B.A. ( 1 963) University of Pittsburgh; M. A. ( 1 965), Ph.D. ( 1 968) Princeton University 
Griebling, Lynn, 1982. Artist Teacher of Music, Voice 

B.Mus. (1967) St. Olafs College; M.M. (1969) University of Wisconsin 
Grob, Alan, 1961. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1952) Utica College; M.A. (1957), Ph.D. (1961) University of Wisconsin 
Gruber, Ira Dempsey, 1 966. Harris Masterson, Jr. Professor of History and Associ- 
ate of Hanszen College 

A.B. ( 1 955), M.A. ( 1959), Ph.D. ( 1 96 1 ) Duke University 
Hacker, Carl S., 1973. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics 

B.S. (1963) William and Mary University; Ph.D. (1968) Rice University 



30 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Hall, Elizabeth R., 1 984. Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineer- 
ing Laboratory 

B.S. (1968), M.S. (1969) Texas Women's University; Ph.D. (1974) University of 

Florida 
Hallam, John S., 1 98 1 . Assistant Professor of Art History 

B.A. (1970) Seattle University, M. A. (1974), Ph.D. (1979) University of Washington 
Hamm, Keith Edward, 1988. Associate Professor of Political Science 

A.B. (1969) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1972) Florida Atlantic University; 

Ph.D. ( 1 977) University of Wisconsin 
Hammond, Michael P., 1 986. Elma Schneider Professor of Music, Dean of the 

Shepherd School of Music and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1959) Lawrence University; Honors B.A. ( 1 959), M.A. ( 1 96 1 ) Oxford University; 

L.H.D. (Hon.) ( 1 975) Lawrence University 
Hannon, James P., 1967. Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. ( 1 962), M.A. ( 1 965), Ph.D. ( 1 967) Rice University 
Harcombe, Paul A., 1972. Professor of Biology and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. ( 1 967) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1973) Yale University 
Hardt, Robert M., 1988. W. L. Moody, Jr. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1967) M.I.T.; Ph.D. (1971) Brown University 
Harris, Ali K., 1988. Lecturer on Civil Engineering 

B.S. (1966) University of Baghdad; M.S. (1968) Stanford; Ph.D. (1972) University of 

Texas 
Harrison, Karey Lea, 1987. Mellon Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. (1982) La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia 
Hartley, Peter Reginald, 1 986. Associate Professor of Economics and Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 974) Australian National University; M.Ec. ( 1 977) Australian National Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. (1980) University of Chicago 
Harvey, F. Reese, 1 968. Edgar Odell Lovett Professor of Mathematics B.S., M.A. 

(1963) Carnegie Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1966) Stanford University 
Haskell, Thomas L., 1970. Samuel G. McCann Professor of History 

B.A. (1961) Princeton University; Ph.D. Stanford University 
Hassett, James, 1987. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.B.A. (1974) University of Hawaii; M. B.A. (1977) University of Chicago 
Hatchett, Terry E., 1982. Adjunct Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A. ( 1 968) Texas A&M University 
Hatton, Gregory, 1983. Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S. (1970) Stanford University; Ph.D. (1974) University of California 
Hauser, Nickolaus, 1 986. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.S. ( 1 97 1 ), M.S. ( 1 973) Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; M.B. A. ( 1 985) University of 

Houston 
Havens, Neil, 1 964. Professor of Drama and Honorary Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1956) Rice Institute; M.A. (1959) Indiana University 
Hayes, Edward F., 1 987. Professor of Chemistry and Associate Provost and Vice- 
President for Information Systems 

B.S. (1963) University of Rochester; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1966) The Johns Hopkins 

University 
Haymes, Robert C, 1 964. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 952), M.S. ( 1 953), Ph.D. ( 1 959) New York University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 3 1 

Hazlewood, Carlton F., 1970. Adjunct Professor of Biophysics in the Physics 

Department 

B.S. (1957) Texas A&M University; Ph.D. (1962) University of Tennessee Medical 

Units at Memphis 
Heile, John, 1987. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (1979) University of Illinois; M. A. (1984) U.C.L.A. 
Heitman, Elizabeth, 1987. Adjunct Lecturer on Religious Studies 

B.A. (1979), M.A. (1985) Rice University 
Hewitt, Charles H., 1 987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrataive Science 

B.S. (1951) Montana School of Mines; M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1956) University of 

Michigan 

Heliums, Jesse David, 1 960. Foyt Family Professor of Chemical Engineering and 

Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. ( 1 950), M.S. ( 1 958) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 96 1 ) University of Michigan 
Hempel, John, 1964. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1957) University of Utah; M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1962) University of Wisconsin 
Heymann, Dieter, 1966. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and of Space 

Physics and Astronomy and Associate of Lovett College 

M.S. (1954). Ph.D. (1958) University of Amsterdam, Netherlands 
Hightower, Joe W.,1967. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering 

and Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (1959) Harding College; M.A. ( 1 96 1 ), Ph.D. ( 1 963) Johns Hopkins University 
Hill, Albina Serebryakova, 1982. Lecturer on Russian in the Department of 

German and Russian and Associate of Will Rice College 

M.A. (1959) Sverdlorsk Pedagogical Institute 
Hill, N. Ross, 1984. Associate Professor of Geophysics 

B.S. (1971) Louisiana State University; M.S. ( 1 973) University of New Orleans; Ph.D. 

( 1 978) University of Virginia 

Holloway, Clyde, 1 977. Professor of Music 

B.Mus. ( 1 957), M.Mus. ( 1 959) University of Oklahoma; D.S.M. ( 1 974) Union Theolog- 
ical Seminary 

Holt, Edward C, 1956. Professor of Civil Engineering, Proctor, and Associate of 
Richardson College 

S.B. (1945), S.M. (1947) Massachusetts Institue of Technology; Ph.D. (1956) Penn- 
sylvania State University 

Hood, Robert T., 1 982. Associate Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 
Brown College 
B.A. ( 1 976), University of Virginia; M.S. ( 1 979), Ph.D. ( 1 982) Cornell University 

House, Waylon V., 1986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 966) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S. ( 1 969), Ph.D. ( 1 974) Universi- 
ty of Pittsburgh 

Howell, William C, 1 968. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Psychology and Admin- 
istrative Science and Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (1954), M.A. (1956), Ph.D. (1958) University of Virginia 

Hsi, Barthotomew P., 1973. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 
M.A. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 964) University of Minnesota 

Huang, Huey W., 1973. Professor of Physics 

B.S. ( 1 962) National Taiwan University; Ph.D. ( 1 967) Cornell University 

Huberman, Brian Michael, 1975. Associate Professor of Art and Associate of 
Wiess College 
Certificate ( 1 974) National Film School of Great Britain 



32 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Huddle, Donald L. 1964. Professor of Economics 

B.S. (1959), M.A. (1960) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1964) Vanderbilt 

University 
Hudspeth, C. M., 1947. Lecturer on Political Science and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.A. (1940) Rice Institute; J.D. (1946) University of Texas 
Hulet, Randall G., 1987, Assistant Professor of Physics and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.S. (1978) Standord University; Ph.D. (1984) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Hurley, Patricia A., Lecturer on Political Science 

B.A. (1972) Tulane University; M.A. (1975), Ph.D. (1976) Rice University 
Huston, J. Dennis, 1969. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen 

B.A. (1961) Wesleyan University; M.A. ( 1 964), Ph.D. ( 1 966) Yale University 
Hutchinson, John S., 1983. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.S. ( 1 977), Ph.D. ( 1 980) University of Texas 
Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, 1988. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1978) Fu-Jen Catholic University; Ph.D. (1985) Iowa State University 
Hyman, Harold M., 1 968. William P. Hobby Professor of History and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.A. ( 1 948) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. ( 1 950), Ph.D. (1952) Columbia 

University 
lammarino, Nicholas K., 1978. Associate Professor of Human Performance and 

Health Sciences and Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.S. (1973) University of Dayton; M.Ed. (1975) University of Toledo; Ph.D. (1978) 

Ohio State University 
Ingersoll, Richard J., 1986. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.A. ( 1 979) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1985) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Inscoe, John C, 1988. Visiting Assistant Professorof History and Visiting Editor 

of the Journal of Southern History 

B.A. ( 1 974) Davidson College; M.A. ( 1 980), Ph.D. (1985) University of North Carolina 
Isgur, Marvin, 1983. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. ( 1 974) University of Houston; M.B. A. (1978) Stanford University 
Isle, Walter Whitfield, 1962. Professor of English 

A.B. (1955) Harvard University; M.A. (1957) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1961) 

Stanford University 
Jansson, Birger, 1975. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1946), Ph.D. (1965) University of Stockholm, Sweden 
Jeys, Thomas H., 1982. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S. ( 1 972), M.S. ( 1 975) Univerfsity of Houston; Ph.D. ( 1 982) Rice University 
Johnson, Don Herrick, 1977. Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering and Associate of Will Rice College 

S.B., S.M. ( 1 970), E.E. (1971), Ph.D. ( 1 974) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Johnston, Dennis A., 1974. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics 

B.S. (1965) Arlington State College; M.A. (1966) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1971) 

Texas Tech University 
Jones, B. Frank, Jr., 1962. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. ( 1 958) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1961) Rice University 
Jones, Roy G., 1 967. Associate Professor of Russian 

B.A. ( 1 954), M. A. ( 1 954) East Texas State University; Ph.D. (1965) University of Texas 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 33 

Jones, Samuel, 1973. Professor of Music and Honorary Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.A. (1957) Millsaps College; M.A. (1958), Ph.D. (1960) Eastman School of Music, 

University of Rochester 
Jost, Robert J., 1980. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Space Physics and 

Astronomy 

B.S. (1974) Portland State University; M.A. (1977), Ph.D. (1979) Rice University 
Jump, J. Robert, 1968. Professor of Computer Science in the Department of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering and Master of Lovett College 

B.S. ( 1 960), M.S. ( 1 962) University of Cincinnati; M.S. ( 1 965), Ph.D. ( 1 968) University 

of Michigan 
Kahan, Alan, 1988. Mellon Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (1980) Princeton University; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. (1987) University of Chicago 
Kamins, Benjamin C, 1987. Artist Teacher of Bassoon 
Karff, Samuel E., 1979. Lecturer on Religious Studies 

A.B. (1949) Gratz College of Jewish Studies; A.B. (1953) Harvard College; M.A.H.L. 

(1956), D.H.L. (1961) Hebrew Union College 

Kasper, Jerome V. V,, 1982. Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1961) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1965) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Kauffmann, Robert Lane, 1976. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1970) Princeton University; Ph.D. (1981) University of California, San Diego 
Keeley, Jack W., 1980. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Environmental 

Science and Engineering 

B.S. (1957) University of Oklahoma; S.M. (1958) Harvard University 
Kelber, Werner H., 1973. Isla Carroll Turner and Percy E. Turner Professor of 

Religious Studies 

M.T. ( 1 963) Princeton Theological Seminary; M.A. ( 1 967), Ph.D. ( 1 970) University of 

Chicago 
Kendall, Richard P., 1981. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (1963), M.A. (1969) University of Texas; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1972) Rice 

University 

Kennedy, Kenneth W., Jr., 1971. Noah Harding Professor in Mathematics in the 

Department of Computer Science 

B.A. (1967) Rice University; M.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1971) New York University 
Kiepper, Alan F,, 1982. Associate Professor of Public Administration 

B.A. (1950) University of New Hampshire; M.P.A. (1960) Wayne State University 
Kim, Dae Mann, 1970. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.S. (1960) Seoul National University, Korea; M.S. (1965), Ph.D. (1967) Yale 
University 

King, Garry C, 1988. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1984) University of Sydney, Australia 
Kinsey, James L., 1987. D.R. Bullard-Welch Foundation Professor of Science in 

Department of Chemistry and Dean of Natural Sciences and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1956), Ph.D. (1959) Rice University 
Kiperman, Anita, Lecturer on Spanish and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1957) Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires; M.A. (1971) University of Houston 
Kirk, David E., 1982. Lecturer on Music, Tuba 

B.M. ( 1 982) Juilliard School of Music 



34 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Klineberg, Stephen L., 1972. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.A. (1961) Haverford College; M.A. (1963) University of Paris, France; Ph.D. (1966) 

Harvard University 
Kobayashi, Riki, 1951. Louis Calder Professor in the Department of Chemical 

Engineering and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. ( 1 944) Rice Institute; M.S.E. ( 1 947), Ph.D. (1951) University of Michigan 
Kolenda, Konstantin, 1953. Carolyn and Fred McManis Professor of Philosophy 

and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 950) Rice Institute; Ph.D. ( 1 953) Cornell University 
Konrad, Linn B,, 1 980. Associate Professor of French and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. (1968) University of Oslo, Norway; M.A. (1972) University of Wisconsin at 

Milwaukee; Ph.D. (1978) University of Minnesota 
Kossowski, Marek, 1983. G.C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1976), Stetson University; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1982) University of North 

Carolina 
Krentel, Mark, 1987. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.S. ( 1 978), M.S. ( 1 979) Clarkson University; Ph.D. ( 1 986) Cornell 
Krishen, Kumar, 1986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.A. (1959) Jammu & Kashmir University; M.S. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) Kansas State 

University 
Kroger, Harry, 1987. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1957) University of Rochester; Ph.D. (1962) Cornell University 
Kroopnick, Peter M., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Geology 

B.S. (1963) Wayne State University; M.S. (1965) University of California, Berkeley; 

Ph.D. (1971) University of California, San Diego 
Kulstad, Mark, 1 975. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A. (1969) Macalester College; Ph.D. (1975) University of Michigan 
Lairson, David Robert, 1977. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A. ( 1 970), M. A., Ph.D. (1975) University of Kentucky 
Lamb, Sydney M., 1981. Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Linguistics 

B.A. (1951) Yale University; Ph.D. (1958) University of California, Berkeley 
Lane, David M., 1976. Associate Professor of Psychology and Resident Associate 

of Lovett College 

B.A. (1971) Clark University; M.A. (1973) Tufts University; Ph.D. (1977) Tulane 

University 
Lane, Neal F., 1 966. Professor of Physics and Provost of the University 

B.S. (1960), M.S. (1962), Ph.D. (1964) University of Oklahoma 
Laughery, Kenneth R., 1982. Henry R. Luce Professor of Psychology 

B.S. (1957), M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1961) Carnegie-Mellon University 
Laux, Lila, 1988. Adjunct Lecturer on Psychology 

B.S. ( 1 96 1 ) Rice University; M.S. ( 1979) University of Southwestern Louisiana; Ph.D. 

(1986) Rice University 
Lavenda, Richard A., 1987. Assistant Professor of Theory and Composition and 

Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1977) Dartmouth College; M.Mus. ( 1 979) Rice University D.M.A. ( 1 983) 

University of Michigan 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 35 

Leal, Maria Teresa, 1965. Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, and Resident 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1946) Pontificia Universidade Catolica, Brazil; Ph.D. (1963) Universidade 

Federal 
Lee, Eva J., 1969 Associate Professor of Human Performance and Health Sci- 
ences, Director of Equal Employment Opportunity Programs, and Associate 

of Jones College 

B.S. (1962) North Texas State University; M.Ed. ( 1 967) Sam Houston State 

University, Ed.D. (1974) Louisiana State University 
Leeds, J. Venn, Jr., 1964. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. ( 1 955), B.S.E.E. ( 1 956) Rice Institute, M.S.E.E. ( 1 960), Ph.D. ( 1 963) University 

of Pittsburgh, J.D. (1972) University of Houston 
Leeman, William P., 1977. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. (1967), M.A. (1969) Rice University, Ph.D. (1974) University of Orgeon 
Leffel, Anita, 1 988. Lecturer on Communications and Associate of Will Rice 

College 

B.A. (1975) Pan American University; M.Ed. ( 1 985) University of Houston 
Levander, Alan R., 1 984. Associate Professor of Geophysics and Resident Associ- 
ate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1976) University of South Carolina; M.S. (1978), Ph.D. (1984), Stanford 

University 
Levin, Donald N,, 1963. Professor of Classics 

B.A. (1949), M.A. (1952) Cornell University; M.A. (1954), Ph.D. (1957) Harvard 

University 
Lewis, Edward S., 1948. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1940) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1947) Harvard University 
Lindley, Juanita W., 1 986. Instructor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B. A.T. ( 1 976) Sam Houston State University; M.S. (1977) James Madison University 
Livaudais, Alfred F., Jr., 1984. Major, U.S. Army, and Professor of Military 

Science 

B.S. (1973) Nicholls State University; M.P.S. (1979) Western Kentucky University 
Loewenheim, Francis Lippmann, 1959. Professor of History A.B. (1947), A.M. 

(1948) University of Cincinnati; Ph.D. (1952) Columbia University 
Logan, Marie-Rose, 1983. Associate Professor of French 

Licence en Philologie Classique (1966); Agregation de Philosophic et Lettres (1967) 

Universite Libre de Bruxelles; M.Ph. (1970), M.A. (1972), Ph.D. (1974) Yale 

University 
Lombard, Jeanette, 1982. Artist Teacher of Voice 

Artists Diploma (1957) Teatro Lirico Sperimentale di Spoleto, Italy; Certificate (1958) 

Accademia di Santa Cecilia, Rome, Italy 
Long, Elizabeth, 1978. Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A. ( 1 966) Stanford University; M.A. ( 1 974), Ph.D. ( 1 979) Brandeis University 
Lott, John, 1987. Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (1980), M.A. (1982), Ph.D. (1984) U.C.L.A. 
Loukissas, Philippos J., 1987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative 

Science 

Diploma ( 1 968) National Technical University of Athens; M.C.P. ( 1 970) University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D. (1977) Cornell University 
Loutzenheiser, Roy C, 1 982. Lecturer in Civil Engineering 

B.S.E. ( 1 966) Ohio State University; M.S.C.E. ( 1 968) Georgia Insthute of Technology; 
Ph.D. (1972) Texas A&M University 



36 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Luca, Sergiu, 1983. Dorothy Richard Starling Professor of Violin 

Artists Diploma ( 1 966) Curtis Institute of Music 
Lurie, Susan, 1 987. Assistant Professor of English and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1969), SUNY; M. A. (1972) University of California, Berkeley 
Lynch, Edward C, 1970. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering 

Laboratory 

A.B. ( 1 953), M.D. ( 1956) University of Washington 
Maas, Michael, 1984. Assistant Professor of History and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. (1973) Cornell University; M.A. (1974), Ph.D. (1982) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Malone, David R., 1983. Lecturer in Music, Double Bass 

B.Mus. (1981), M.Mus. ( 1 98 1 ) Shepherd School of Music, Rice University 
Mandel, James P., 1986. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.S. ( 1 967), M.B.A. ( 1 969), Ph.D. (1973) University of Illinois 
Maranhao, Tullio P., 1 982. Associate Professor of Anthropology and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.A. (1970) Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; M.A. (1975) Universidade de 

Brasilia; Ph.D. (1981) Harvard University 
Marcus, George E., 1 975. Piofessor of Anthropology and Associate of Richardson 

College 

B.A. (1968) Yale University; Ph.D. (1976) Harvard University 
Margrave, John L., 1963. E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. ( 1 948), Ph.D. (1951) University of Kansas 
Marowsky, Gerd H., 1 980. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1966) Technical University, Germany; Ph.D. University of Gottingen, Germany 
Martell, Richard F. 1988. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. ( 1 978) California State College; M.A. ( 1 986) New York University 
Martin, Randi C, 1 982. Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. (1971) University of Oregon; M.S. ( 1 977), Ph.D. ( 1 979) Johns Hopkins University 
Martin, William C, 1968. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Richardson 

College 

B.A. (1958), M.A. (1960) Abilene Christian College; B.D. (1963) Harvard Divinity 

School; Ph.D. (1969) Harvard University 
Matthews, Kathleen Shive, 1972. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1966) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1970) University of California, Berkeley 
Matusow, Allen Joseph, 1963. William Gaines Twyman Professor of History, 

Dean of the School of Humanities, and Associate of Hanzen College 

B.A. ( 1 958) Ursinus College; M.A. ( 1 959), Ph.D. ( 1 963) Harvard University 
Mayer, Uri, 1986. Artist Teacher, Conducting, Music Director, Shepherd Sym- 
phony Orchestra 

Diploma (1964) Tel Aviv Conservatory of Music, Diploma (1968) University of Tel 

Aviv, Graduate Diploma ( 1 970) Juilliard School of Music 
McCormick, Peggy V., 1983. Adjunct Lecturer on Accounting 

B.S. (1971) University of Tennessee; M.P.A. (1975) Georgia State University 
McEvilley, Thomas, 1 969. Visiting Lecturer on Art History 

B.A. (1963) University of Cincinnati; M.A. (1965) University of Washington; Ph.D. 

(1968) University of Cincinnati 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 37 

Mclntire, Larry V„ 1970. E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemical and Biomedical 
Engineering 

B.Ch.E., M.S. (1966) Cornell University; M.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1970) Princeton 
University 
Mcintosh, Roderick J., 1 980. Professor of Anthropology and Co-Master of Baker 
College 

B.A. ( 1 973) Yale University; M.Litt. ( 1 975), Ph.D. ( 1 979) Trinity College, University 
of Cambridge, England 
Mcintosh, Susan Keech, 1 980. Professor of Anthropology and Co-Master of Baker 
College 

B.A. (1975) Girton College, University of Cambridge; M.A. (1976), Ph.D. (1979) 

University of California, Santa Barbara 
McLellan, Rex B., 1 964. Professor of Materials Science and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.Met. (1957) Sheffield University, England; Ph.D. (1962) Leeds University, England 
McNeil, Linda M., 1 984. Associate Professor of Education and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.A. (1966), Texas Tech University; M.A. (1968), Baylor University; Ph.D. (1977) 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 
McQuilkin, Caryn, 1986. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.S. (1974) Indiana University; M. B.A. (1977) University of Chicago 
Meconi, Honey, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Musicology in the Shepherd School 

of Music 

A.B. (1974) Pennsylvania State University; A.M. (1980) Harvard University; Ph.D. 

( 1 986) Harvard University 
Meeks, William Hamilton, III, 1984. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. (1971), M.A. (1974), Ph.D. (1975) University of California, Berkeley 
Meixner, John, 1968. Professor of English and Associate of Sid Richardson 

College 

B.A. (1951) City College of New York; M.A. ( 1 953), Ph.D. ( 1 957) Brown University 
Merwin, John E., 1 955. Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering 

B.A. ( 1 952), B.S.M.E. ( 1 953), M.S.M.E. (1955) Rice Institute; Ph.D. ( 1 962) University 

of Cambridge, England 
Michel, F. Curtis, 1 963. Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics in the 

Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics and Associate of 

Jones College 

B.A. ( 1 955), Ph.D. ( 1 962) California Institute of Technology 
Middleton, David, 1 98 1 . Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (1942), M.A. (1945), Ph.D. (1947) Harvard University 
Miele, Angelo, 1 964. Professor of Aerospace Sciences and Mathematical Sciences 

Dr. C.E. (1944), Dr. A. E. (1946) University of Rome, Italy 
Mieszkowski, Peter, 1981. Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Professor of Economics 

and Finance 

B.S. ( 1 957), M.A. ( 1 959) McGill University; Ph.D. ( 1 963) Johns Hopkins University 
Miettinen, Hannu E., 1977. Associate Professor of Physics 

Fil. Kand. (1967), Fil. Lie. (1971) University of Helsinki, Finland; Ph.D. (1975) 

University of Michigan 
Milburn, Ellsworth, 1975. Professor of Music and Associate of Baker College 

A.B. (1962) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1968) Mills College; D.M.A. 

College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati 



38 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Miller, Clarence A., 1981. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering 

and Associate of Baker College 

B.A., B.S. (1961) Rice University; Ph.D. ( 1 969) University of Minnesota 
Mitchell, E. Douglas, 1981. Adjunct Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1952) Baylor University; Ph.D. (1966) University of Texas 
Mitchell, O, Jackson, 1966. Professor of Architecture and Dean of the School of 

Architecture 

B.Arch. (1954) Washington University; M.Arch., M.C.P. (1961) University of 

Pennsylvania 
Mixon, John, 1970. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.B. A. (1952) Stephen F. Austin State University; J.D. ( 1 955) University of Houston; 

L.L.M. ( 1 962) Yale University 
Montgomery, Joseph C, 1988. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Physics (1971), B.S., Psychology (1978) University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D. 

( 1 985) Colorado State University 
Moorhead, Louise C, 1 986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A. (1969) University of South Florida; M.D. (1973) Univ. of Florida, Gainesville 
Morgan, T. Clifton, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Political Science and Associate of 

Sid Richardson College 

B.A. ( 1 978) University of Oklahoma; M. A. ( 1 980), Ph.D. ( 1 986) University of Texas at 

Austin 
Morris, Wesley Abram, 1968. Professor of English 

B.A. (1961), M. A. (1963) University of Kentucky; Ph.D. (1968) University of Iowa 
Morrison, Donald Ray, 1988. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1977) Carleton College; Ph.D. (1983) Princeton University 
Morrison, Judith Steinhoff, 1988. Lecturer on Art and Art History 

B.A. (1976) Sarah Lawrence College; M.F.A. (1983) Princeton University 
Morshedi, A. Michael, 1987. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. ( 1 969). M.S. ( 1 97 1 ), Ph.D. (1973) University of Missouri 
Moseley, S. Kelley, 1987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.B.A. ( 1 967), M.B.A. ( 1 970) George Washington University; D.P.H. ( 1 974) Universi- 
ty of Texas 
Murphy, Paul H., 1 979. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Electri- 
cal and Computer Engineering 

A.B. (1965) Northeastern University; M.S. (1968), Ph.D. (1970) University of Kansas 
Mutchler, Gordon S., 1968. Professor of Physics 

B.S. (1960), Ph.D. (1966) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Napier, H. Albert, 1983. Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. ( 1 966), M.B.A. ( 1 968), Ph.D. (1971) University of Texas at Austin 
Nelson, Deborah Hubbard, 1974. Associate Professor of French and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.A. (1960) Wittenberg University; Certificat d'etudes Francaises, ler Degre (1961) 

University of Grenoble, France; M. A. (1964), Ph.D. (1970) Ohio State University 
Newfield, Christopher, 1987. Assistant Professor of English and Resident Associ- 
ate of Jones College 

B.A. ( 1 979) Reed College; M. A. ( 1 984) Cornell University 
Newman, James H., 1985. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Space Physics and 

Astronomy 

B.A. ( 1 978) Dartmouth College; M.A. ( 1 982), Ph.D. ( 1 984) Rice University 
Newton, Norma, 1982. Artist Teacher of Voice 

B.Mus. ( 1 958) Syracuse University; M.Mus ( 1 962) University of Texas 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 39 

Nielsen, Niels C, Jr. 1951. J. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philosophy and 

Religious Thought and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. ( 1 942) George Pepperdine University; B.D., ( 1 946) Ph.D. ( 1 95 1 ) Yale University 
Noble, Stephen T., 1986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Space Physics and 

Astronomy 

B.S. ( 1 980) Florida Institute of Technology; M.S. ( 1 983), Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Nudelman, Harvey, 1985. Adjunct Lecturer in Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.S. (1961) Washington University; M.S. (1965) Iowa State University; Ph.D. (1971) 

University of Illinois Medical Center 
O'Dell, Charles Robert, 1982. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S.Ed. (1959) Illinois State University; Ph.D. (1962) University of Wisconsin 
Odhiambo, Atieno, 1988. Visiting Associate Professor of History 

B.A. (1970) Makerere University College; Ph.D. (1973) University of Nairobi 
Oldow, John Steven, 1978. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1972) University of Washington; Ph.D. (1978) Northwestern University 
Olson, John Steven, 1973. Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.S. (1968) University of Illinois; Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 
Overall, John E., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

B.S. (1954) Trinity University; M.A. (1956), Ph.D. (1958) University of Texas 
Page, Paula, 1985. Artist Teacher, Harp 

B.Mus. (1969) Cleveland Institute of Music 
Palmer, Graham A., 1974. Professor of Biochemistry and Associate of Sid Rich- 
ardson College 

B.S. (1957), Ph.D. (1962) University of Sheffield, England 
Papademetriou, Peter C, 1968. Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1965) Princeton University; M.Arch. (1968) Yale University 
Papamichalis, Panagiotis E., 1985. Lecturer in Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.S. (1967) National Technical University, Athens, Greece; M.S.E.E. (1975), Ph.D. 

(1980) Georgia Institute of Technology 
Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T., 1 980. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department 

of Chemical Engineering 

Diploma of Chemical Engineering (1974) National Technical University of Athens, 

Greece; M.S. (1976), Ph.D. (1980) Purdue University 
Parks, Thomas W., 1 967. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.E.E. ( 1 96 1 ), M.S. ( 1 964), Ph.D. ( 1 967) Cornell University 
Parry, Ronald J., 1978. Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (1964) Occidental College; Ph.D. (1968) Brandeis University 
Parsons, Spencer W., 1969. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1953) University of Michigan; M.Arch. ( 1 963) Harvard University 
Patten, Robert L., 1969. Professor of English and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. ( 1 960) Swarthmore College; M.A. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 965) Princeton University 
Peaceman, Donald W., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.Ch.E. ( 1 947) College of the City of New York; Sc.D. (1952) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Pearlman, Michael David, 1 980. Lecturer in Computer Science and Associate of 

Baker College 

B.S. (1975) Carlton University, Canada; M.S. (1978) Cornell University 



40 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Pearson, James Boyd, Jr., 1 965. J.S. Abercrombie Professor in the Department of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E. (1958), M.S.E.E. (1959) University of Arkansas; Ph.D. (1962) Purdue 

University 
Perez, J. Bernardo, 1979. Assistant Professor of Spanish and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

Licenciatura (1972) Universidad de Granada, Spain; M. A. ( 1 974), Ph.D. ( 1 982) Uni- 
versity of Iowa 
Peters, Albert W., 1983. Instructor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 
Perry, John, 1983. Artist Teacher, Piano 

B.Mus. (1956), M.Mus. (1957) Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester 
Pfeiffer, Paul E., 1947. Professor of Mathematical Sciences and Electrical and 

Computer Engineering and Associate of Brown College 

B.S.E.E. (1938) Rice Institute; B.D. (1943) Southern Methodist University; M.S.E.E. 

(1948), Ph.D. (1952) Rice Institute 
Pharr, George M., 1 980. Associate Professor of Materials Science and Associate of 

Wiess College 

B.S.M.E. (1975) Rice University; M.S.M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1979) Stanford University 
Phenix, Linda G., 1981. Instructor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.F.A. (1977) University of Texas; M.A. (1978) Sam Houston State University 
Phillips, Jr., George N., 1987. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1974), Ph.D. (1977) Rice University 
Phillips, Lyn Bracewell, 1986. Lecturer on Humanities 

B.A. ( 1 968) Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. ( 1 980) University of Texas 
Philpott, Charles William, 1 964. Professor of Biology and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. ( 1 957), M.S. ( 1 958) Texas Technological College; Ph.D. ( 1 962) Tulane University 
Pickar, Richard W., 1976. Associate Professor of Music 

B.A. ( 1 956) University of California, Los Angeles; Diploma (1957) Akademie fur Musik 

und darstellende Kunst, Austria; M.A. (1964) Sam Houston State University 
Pier, Stanley M., 1974. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science 

B.S. (1948) Brooklyn College; Ph.D. (12952) Purdue University 
Piper, William Bowman, 1969. Professor of English B.A. (1951) Harvard Universi- 
ty; M.A. (1952) Columbia University; Ph.D. ( 1 958) University of Wisconsin 
Poindexter, Hally Beth W., 1965. Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1947) Rice Institute; B.S. (1949) University of Houston; M.A. (1950) University 

of Northern Colorado; Ed.D. (1957) Columbia University 
Polking, John C, 1 968. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (1956) University of Notre Dame; M.S. (1961), Ph.D., (1966) University of 

Chicago 
Pollitt, Ernesto, 1981. Adjunct Professor of Anthropology B.A. ( 1 957) University 

of Lima; Ph.D. (1968) Cornell University 
Poon, Yat Sun, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

GCE A-Level ( 1 977) Won Put Nam College; B.S. (1981) Chinese University; Ph.D. 

(1985) Oxford University 
Pomerantz, James R., 1988. Elma W. Schneider Professor of Psychology and Dean 

of the School of Social Sciences 

B.A. ( 1 968) University of Michigan; Ph.D. ( 1 974) Yale University 
Pope, Alhert H., 1986. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B. Arch. ( 1 978) Southern California Institute of Architecture; M. Arch. ( 1 986) Princeton 

University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 4 1 

Poulos, Basilios N., 1975. Professor of Art and Associate of Brown College 

B.F.A. ( 1 965) Atlanta School of Art; M.F.A. ( 1 968) Tulane University 
Pyung-Soo, Kim, 1981. Instructor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.A. (1963) Han Kak University of Foreign Studies, South Korea 
Quiocho, Florante A., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1959) Central Philippine University; M.S. (1961) Howard University; Ph.D. 

(1966) Yale University 
Raaphorst, Madeleine Rousseau, 1963. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es lettres (1939) Universite de Poitiers, France; Licence en droit (1943) 

Universite de Paris, France; Ph.D. (1959) Rice Institute 
Rabson, Thomas Avelyn, 1959. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. (1954), B.S.E.E. (1955), M.A. (1957), Ph.D. (1959) Rice Institute 
Rachal, Joel P., 1986. Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Visiting Assistant Professor of 

Naval Science 

B.S.E.E. (1977) Louisiana State University 
Rau, Carl, 1983. Professor of Physics 

Diplom-Physiker (1967), Dr.rer.nat. (1970) Technical University, Munich, Germany 
Raulston, Dwight L., 1985. Adjunct Insrtructor of Computer Science 

B.A. (1975), Ph.D. (1979) Rice University 
Raymond, Richard L., 1986. Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science 

B.S. ( 1 947), M.S. (1951) University of Illinois 
Rea, Joan, 1968. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Master of 

Wiess College 

B.A. (1954) New York University; M.A. (1964) University of Houston; Ph.D. (1970) 

University of Texas 
Reiner, Martin A., 1985. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.A. ( 1 966) City College of City University of New York; M.P.A. ( 1 968) Ph.D. ( 1 973) 

Maxwell School, Syracuse University 
Reiser, Stanley J., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. (1959) Columbia University; M.D. (1963) State University of New York Down- 
state Medical Center; M.P.A. ( 1 966) John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard 

University; Ph.D. (1970) Harvard University 
Retiz, Leonard, 1986. Lecturer on German 

B.A. ( 1 96 1 ), Ph.D. ( 1 970) University of Texas at Austin 
Riese, W.C. Rusty, 1985. Adjunct Assistant Professor of geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1973) New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; M.S. ( 1 977), Ph.D. ( 1 980) 

University of New Mexico 
Rimlinger, Gaston V., 1 960. Reginald Henry Hargrove Professor of Economics 

and .Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1951) University of Washington; Ph.D. ( 1 956) University of California, Berkeley 
Robert, Mark A. 1984. Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Dip. (1975) Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich; Ph.D. (1980) Swiss Federal 

Institute of Technology, Lusanne 
Roberts, Jabus B., Jr., 1975. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1965) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Pennsylvania 
Roberts, John M., 1 959. Professor of Materials Science and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A.Sc. ( 1 953), M.A.Sc. ( 1 954) University of Toronto. Canada; Ph.D. ( 1 960) Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania 
Robinson, Edward, 1985. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.Sc. (1956) Birmingham University, England; Ph.D. (1969) University of London 



42 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Roediger, Henry L., 1988. Professor of Psychology 

B.A. ( 1 969) Washington & Lee University; Ph.D. ( 1 973) Yale University 
Rorschach, Harold E., 1952. Sam and Helen Worden Professor of Physics and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

S.B. (1949), S.M. (1950), Ph.D. (1952) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Rosborough, James W., 1983. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative 

Science 

B.S. (1958) Cornell University; M. B.A. (1970) Drexel University 
Rose, Beatrice S., 1977. Lecturer on Music, Harp 
Ross, David, III, 1979. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. ( 1 962) Yale University; M.B.A. ( 1 970) Harvard University 
Rudolph, Frederick B., 1972. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. ( 1 966) University of Missouri; Ph.D. ( 1 97 1 ) Iowa State University 
Rupp, George, 1985. President and Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. (1964) Princeton University; B.D. (1967) Yale University; Ph.D. (1972) Harvard 

University 
Sachs, Michael, 1987. Artist Teacher of Trumpet 

B.A. (1983) U.C.L.A. 
Samuels, Danny M., 1981. Visiting Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (1971) Rice University 
San, Ka-Yiu, 1984. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 978) Rice; Ph.D. ( 1 984) California Institute of Technology 
Sanborn, Hugh W., 1 973. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. ( 1 962) Muhlenberg College; B.D. ( 1 967) Andover Newton Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D. (1975) University of Iowa 
Sass, Ronald L., 1 958. Professor of Biology and Chemistry, Honorary Associate of 

Hanszen College, and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1954) Augustana College; Ph.D. (1957) University of Southern California 
Sauerbrey, Roland, 1985. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

Dip. ( 1 978); Ph.D. ( 1 98 1 ) University Wuerzburg, West Germany 
Savit, Carl H., 1988. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1942), M.S. (1943) California Institute of Technology 
Sawyer, Dale S., 1988. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. ( 1 976) Purdue University; Ph.D. ( 1 982) M.I.T. 
Schaezler, Donald J., 1979. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of 

Environmental Science and Engineering and Adjunct Associate Professor in 

the Department of Chemical Engineering 

B.A. ( 1 966), B.S. ( 1 967), Ph.D. ( 1 970) Rice University 
Schaffer, Alejandro A., 1988. Assistant Professor in Computer Science 

B.S. ( 1 983), M.S. ( 1 983) Carnegie-Mellon 
Schnoebelen, Anne, 1 974. Professor of Music B.A. ( 1 958) Rosary College; M.Mus. 

( 1 960), Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of Illinois 
Schreiber, B. Charlotte, 1983. Adjunct Professor of Geology 

A.B. (1953) Washington University; M.S. (1966) Rutgers University; Ph.D. (1974) 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Schreiber, Janet M., 1976. Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 968) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. ( 1 970), Ph.D. ( 1 973) Universi- 
ty of California, Berkeley 
Schroder, G.D., 1979. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A. (1967), M.A. ( 1 970) Rice University; Ph.D. ( 1 974) University of New Mexico 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 43 

Schroepfer, George J., Jr., 1972. Ralph and Dorothy Looney Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Chemistry 
B.S. ( 1 955), M.D. ( 1 957), Ph.D. ( 1 96 1 ) University of Minnesota 

Schwarzer, Rudy R., 1974. Adjunct Associate Professor of Geology and 
Geophysics 
B.S. ( 1 963), M.S. ( 1 966), Ph.D. ( 1 969) Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Scott, David W., 1979. Professor of Statistics 
B.A. (1972), M.A., Ph.D. (1976) Rice University 

Sears, David A., 1983. Adjunct Professor in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (1953) Yale University; M.S. ( 1 958), M.D. ( 1 959) University of Portland Medical 
School 

Seed, Patricia, 1 982. Associate Professor of History B.A. (1971) Fordham Univer- 
sity; M. A. ( 1 975) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 980) University of Wisconsin 

Sellers, James, 1971. David Rice Professor of Ethics 

B.E.E. (1947) Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S. (1952) Florida State University; 
Ph.D. (1958) VanderbiU University 

Semmes, Stephen W., 1987. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1980) Armstrong State College; Ph.D. (1983) Washington University 

Seriff, Aaron J. 1982. Adjunct Professor of Geology and and Geophysics and 
Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1944), M.A. (1946) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1951) California Institute of 
Technology 

Shalen, Peter B., 1974. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (1966), Ph.D. (1972) Harvard University 

Shank, C. Dean, Jr. 1984. Artist Teacher of Secondary Piano and Piano 
Technology 
B.Mus. ( 1 968), M.Mus. ( 1 97 1 ) North Texas State University 

Shanks, Jacqueline V., 1988. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (1983) Iowa State University 

Sherman, William H., 1 986. Assistant Professor of Architecture 
A.B. ( 1 977) Princeton University; M.Arch. ( 1 982) Yale University 

Sherwood, Arthur M., 1988. Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering 
B.E.E. (1966), M.S.E.E. (1967) Georgia Tech; Ph.D. (1970) Duke University 

Shetty, Anand B., 1987. Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Health 
Sciences and Associate of Lovett College 

B.Sc. (1977) Mysore University; B.P.Ed. (1978) Karnatak University; M.A. (1979) 
University of Mysore; Ph.D. (1986) University of Northern Colorado 

Shirley, Dennis L., 1988. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A. (1977) University of Virginia; M. A. ( 1 98 1 ) New School for Social Research 

Shmider, Edward, 1983. Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1968) Mussorgsky Musical College, Leningrad, U.S.S.R.; M.Mus. (1975), 
Aspirant Diploma ( 1 979) Gnesin Music Academy, Moscow, U.S.S.R. 

Sickles, Robin, 1985. Professor of Economics and Statistics 

B.S. ( 1 972) Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D. ( 1 976) University of North Caroli- 
na, Chapel Hill 

Sinclair, James B., 1978. Associate Professor of Computer Science in the Depart- 
ment of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Associate of Brown College 
B.S.E.E. (1973), M.E.E. (1974), Ph.D. (1979) Rice University 



44 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Skaggs, Ray H., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.A. (1942) Rice Institute; M.D. (1945) University of Texas 
Skura, Meredith, 1978. Professor of English 

B.A. ( 1 965) Swarthmore College; Ph.D. ( 1 97 1 ) Yale University 
Slayton, Barney F., 1 987. Lt. Colonel U.S. Army and Adjunct Professor of Military 

Science 

B.A. ( 1 967) Sam Houston State University; M.A. ( 1 980) University of Kansas 
Smalley, Richard E., 1 976. Norman and Gene Hackerman Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. ( 1 965) University of Michigan; M.A. ( 1 97 1 ), Ph.D. ( 1 973) Princeton University 
Smith, David P., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (1962) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1979) Harvard University 
Smith, George, 1981. Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A. (1969) San Francisco Art Institute; M.A. (1972) Hunter College 
Smith, Gordon W., 1968. Professor of Economics 

University; Ph.D. (1966) Harvard University 
Smith, Richard J., 1973. Professor of History 

B.A. (1965), M.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1972) University of California, Davis 
Smith, V.C., 1979. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical 

Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 967), M.S. ( 1 968) Oklahoma State University 
Snow, Edward A., 1981. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1964) Rice University; M.A. (1966) University of California, Riverside; Ph.D. 

(1969) State University of New York, Buffalo 
Soligo, Ronald, 1967. Professor of Economics and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. ( 1 958) University of British Columbia, Canada; Ph.D. ( 1 964) Yale University 
Solis, R. Thomas, 1 979. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Biomedical Engineer- 
ing Laboratory 

B.A. ( 1 960) Texas A&M University; M.A. ( 1 962) Oxford University; M.D. ( 1 965) Yale 

University 
Sonntag, Christopher H., 1987. Captain of U.S. Navy and Visiting Assistant 

Professor and Associate of Wiess College 

B. A. ( 1 978) Marquette University; M.S. ( 1 986) University of Southern California 
Spanos, Pol D., 1 984. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering 

Dip. (1973) National Technical University (Greece); M.S. ( 1 974); Ph.D. ( 1 976) Califor- 
nia Institute of Technology 
Spence, Dale W., 1963. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1956) Rice Institute; M.S. (1959) North Texas State University; Ed.D. (1966) 

Louisiana State University 
Sperling, Harry G., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Biology 

A.B. (1944) University of Pennsylvania; M.S. (1946) New School, New York; Ph.D. 

(1953) Columbia University 
Spivak, Michael D., 1984. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. (1960) Harvard University; Ph.D. (1964) Princeton University 
Stanton, R. John, Jr., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1962) Rice University; M. B.A. (1965) Harvard University 
Stebbings, Ronald F., 1968. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and of 

Physics, Vice-President for Student Affairs and Associate of Jones College 

B.Sc. ( 1952), Ph.D. ( 1 956) University of London, England 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 45 

Steenburgh, Frederick L., 1985. Commander, U.S. Navy, NROTC Executive 

Officer, Associate Professor of Naval Science 

B.S. ( 1 965) University of Rochester; M.B.A. ( 1 976) Mississippi State University 
Stein, Robert M,, 1979. Associate Professor of Political Science and Associate of 

Jones College 

B.A. (1972) Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A. ( 1 974), Ph.D. ( 1 977) University 

of Wisconsin at Milwaukee 
Stevenson, Paul M., 1984. Assistant Professor of Physics and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.A. (1976) Cambridge; Ph.D. (1979) Imperial College, London 
Stewart, Charies R., 1969. Professor of Biology and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1962) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1967) Stanford University 
Stokes, Gale, 1968. Professor of History 

B.A. (1954) Colgate University; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1970) Indiana University 
Stoll, Richard J., 1979. Associate Professor of Political Science and Associate of 

Jones College 

A.B. (1974) University of Rochester; Ph.D. (1979) University of Michigan 
Stormer, John C, Jr., 1983. Croneis Professor of Geology 

A.B. (1963) Dartmouth College; Ph.D. (1971) University of California, Berkeley 
Strassmann, Diana 1983. Assistant Professor of Economics and Associate of Baker 

College 

A.B. ( 1 977) Princeton University; M.A. ( 1 982), Ph.D. ( 1 983) Harvard University 
Strassmann, Joan E,, 1 980. Associate Professor of Biology and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.A. (1974) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1979) University of Texas 
Subtelny, Stephen, 1968. Professor of Biology and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1949) Hobart College; M.A. (1952), Ph.D. (1955) University of Missouri 
Sullivan, Kathryn D., 1985. Adjunct Assistant Professor in Geology and 

Geophysics 

B.S. (1973) University of California, Santa Cruz; Ph.D. (1978) Dalhousie University, 

Halifax, Nova Scotia 
Sullivan, Michael E,, 1986. Captain, U.S. Navy and Professor of Naval Science 

B.S. ( 1 962) U.S. Naval Academy; M.S. (1971) Naval Postgraduate School 
Swint, John Michael, 1977. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A. (1968) California State University at Humboldt; M.A., Ph.D. (1972) Rice 

University 
Symes, William W., 1984. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (1971) University of California at Berkeley; M.A., Ph.D. (1975) Harvard 

University 
Talwani, Manik, 1985. Schlumberger Professor of Geophysics 

B.Sc.Hons. (1951), M.Sc.( 1 953) Delhi University; Ph.D. ( 1 959) Columbia University; 

Ph.D. (Honoris Causa) ( 1 98 1 )Oslo University 
Taner, M. Turhan, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

M.S. (1950) Technical University of Istanbul 
Tapia, Richard A., 1970. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. ( 1 96 1 ), M.A. ( 1 966), Ph.D. ( 1 967) University of California, Los Angeles 
Taylor, Julie M., 1981. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 966) Harvard University; Diploma ( 1 969), D.Phil. ( 1 974) University of Oxford 



46 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Taylor, Ronald N., 1 983. George R. Brown Professor of Administration, Professor 

of Psychology and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1960) Westminster College; M.A. (1964) University of Nebraska; Ph.D. (1970) 

University of University of Minnesota 
Taylor, William M., 1988. Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1961), M.S. (1962), Ph.D. (1979) University of Chicago 
Temkin, Larry S., 1 983. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.A. ( 1 975) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1981) Princeton University 
Thames, Howard D., Jr., 1975. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. ( 1 963), Ph.D. ( 1 970) Rice University 
Thompson, EwaM., 1970. Professor of Russian 

B.A. (1963) University of Warsaw, Poland; M.F.A. (1963) Sopot Conservatory of 

Music, Poland; Ph.D. (1967) VanderbiU University 
Thompson, James R., 1 970. Professor of Statistics and Associate of Lovett College 

B.Eng. ( 1 960) Vanderbih University; M.A. ( 1 963), Ph.D. ( 1 965) Princeton University 
Tittel, Frank K., 1967. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1955), M.A., Ph.D. (1959) Oxford University, England 
Tobin, Mary L., 1979. Lecturer on English 

B.A. (1963) Carleton College; M.A. (1966) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1973) Rice 

University 
Todd, Anderson, 1 949. Gus Sessions Wortham Professor in Architecture 

B.A. (1943), M.F.A. (1949) Princeton University 
Tomson, Mason B,, 1977. Associate Professor of Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1967) Southwestern State College; Ph.D. (1972) Oklahoma State University 
Trammell, George T., 1961. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1944) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1950) Cornell University 
Traweek, Sharon, 1987. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 964) University of California at Berkeley; M.A. ( 1 966) California State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. ( 1 982) University of California at Santa Cruz 
Trepel, Shirley, 1975. Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1945) Curtis Institute of Music 
Tsuchitani, Chiyeko, 1 986. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering 

B.A. (1961) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1966) University of Louisville 
Tuggle, Francis D., 1978. Jesse H. Jones Professor of Management, Professor of 

Psychology, and Associate of Brown College 

S.B. ( 1 964) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S. ( 1 967), Ph.D. (1971) Carnegie- 
Mellon University 
Tyler, Stephen A., 1970. Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics 

B.A. ( 1 957) Simpson College; M.A. ( 1 962), Ph.D. ( 1 964) Stanford University 
Udden, Mark M., 1983. Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineer- 
ing Laboratory 

M.A., S.B. (1973) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.D. (1977) Southwestern 

Medical School, University of Texas, Dallas 
Decker, Wilfred C, 1984. Harmon Whittington Professor of Accounting, Associ- 
ate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of 

Administration, and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1968), M.B.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1973) University of Texas at Austin 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 47 

Ulrich, Roger B., 1984. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History and Resident 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B. A. ( 1 977) Dartmouth College; M.A. ( 1 980), Ph.D. ( 1 984) Yale University 
Urnitibeheity, Hector N., 1967. Associate Professor of Spanish and Linguistics 

Profesorado (1956) La Plata National University, Argentina; Ph.D. (1968) Stanford 

University 
Vail, Peter R., 1986. W. Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography 

A.B. ( 1 952) Dartmouth College; M.S. ( 1 953), Ph.D. (1959) Northwestern University 
Valdivieso, Mercedes, 1973. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of 

Richardson College 

Bachillerato (1946) University of Chile; M.A. (1969) University of Houston 
Van Helden, Albert, 1970. Professor of History 

B.Eng. ( 1 962), M.S. ( 1 964) Stevens Institute of Technology; M.A. ( 1 967) University of 

Michigan; Ph.D. (1970) London University, England 
Varman, Peter J. 1983. Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the Depart- 
ment of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.Tech. ( 1 978) Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; M.S.E.E. ( 1 980); Ph.D. ( 1 983) 

University of Texas, Austin 
Veech, William A., 1969. Milton B. Porter Professor of Mathematics 

A.B. (1960) Dartmouth College; Ph.D. (1963) Princeton University 
Veletsos, Anestis S., 1964. Brown and Root Professor, Department of Civil 

Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 948) Robert College, Turkey; M.S. ( 1 950), Ph.D. ( 1 953) University of Illinois 
Viebig, V. Richard, Jr., 1 969. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.A. (1962), Master of Accounting (1977) Rice University 
Visser, Pieter A., 1979. Adjunct Lecturer on Music 
von der Mehden, Fred R., 1968. Albert Thomas Professor of Political Science, 

Professor of Administrative Science and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. ( 1 948) University of the Pacific; M.A. ( 1 950) Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D. 

(1957) University of California, Berkeley 
Waldman, Peter D., 1981. Associate Professor of Architecture and Master of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1965), M.F.A. (1967) Princeton University 
Walker, James B., 1 964. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1943) Rice Institute; M.A. (1949), Ph.D. (1952) University of Texas 
Walker, William F., 1 965. ProfessorofMechanical Engineering and Mathematical 

Sciences and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1 960), M.S. ( 1 96 1 ) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 966) Oklahoma State University 
Wallace, Kristine Gilmartin, 1966. Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A. ( 1 963) Bryn Mawr College; M.A.( 1 965), Ph.D. ( 1 967) Stanford 
Walters, G. King, 1 963. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1953) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1956) Duke University 
Wang, Chao-Cheng, 1 968. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematical Sciences and 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 959) National Taiwan University; Ph.D. ( 1 965) Johns Hopkins University 
Ward, Calvin H., 1 966. Professor of Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S. (1955) New Mexico State University; M.S. ( 1 958), Ph.D. ( 1 960) Cornell Universi- 
ty; M.P.H. ( 1 978) University of Texas School of Public Health 
Ward, Joseph A,, Jr., 1964. Professor of English 

A.B. (1952) University of Notre Dame; M.A. (1954), Ph.D. (1957) Tulane University 



48 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Warren, Joe D., 1986. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 

Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1983), M.S. (1985) Rice University; Ph.D. (1986) Cornell University 
Warren, Scott K., 1979. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.A. (1972), M.A. (1974), Ph.D. (1976) Rice University 
Waters, C. Kenneth, 1987. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Associate of 

Wiess College 

B.A. (1979) University of Vermont; M.A. (1984) Ph.D. (1985) Indiana University 
Waters, David L., 1976. Artist Teacher of Trombone 

B.M.E. (1962) University of Houston; M.Mus. (1964) University of Texas 
Watkins, Michael J., 1980. Professor of Psychology 

B.Sc. (1965, 1969), Ph.D. (1972) University of London, England 
Weinberg, Armin D., 1 980. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.A. ( 1 966), Ph.D. ( 1 97 1 ) Ohio State 
Weisheit, Jon C, 1988. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1966) University of Texas-El Paso; M.S. (1969) Ph.D. (1970) Rice University 
Weisman, R. Bruce, 1979. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (1971) Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. (1977) 
Weissenberger, Klaus H.M., 1971. Professor of German and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. ( 1959), M.A. ( 1 965) University of Hamburg, Germany; Ph.D. ( 1 967) University of 

Southern California 
Wells, Raymond O., Jr., 1965. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. ( 1 962) Rice University; M.S. ( 1 964), Ph.D. ( 1 965) New York University 
Westheimer, Alan D., 1983. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.S.E. (1965) University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A. (1966) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Wheeler, Mary Fanett, 1974. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

B.A., B.S. (1960), M.A. (1963) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1971) Rice University 
White, Frank S., 1982. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1977) Rochester Institute of Technology 
White, Robert A., 1981. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1966) New Mexico State University; Ph.D. (1970) University of Chicago 
Whitmire, Kenton H., 1982. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.S. (1977) Roanoke College; Ph.D. (1982) Northwestern University 
Wicks, Camilla, 1988. Professor of Violin 

(1938-42) Juilliard School of Music 
Widrig, Walter M., 1969. Associate Professor of Art History and Associate of 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1951) Yale University; M.A. (1956) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1975) New 

York University 
Wiener, Martin J., 1967. Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of History 

B.A. ( 1 962) Brandeis University; M.A. ( 1 963), Ph.D. ( 1 967) Harvard University 
Wierum, Frederic Atherton, Jr., 1 96 1 . Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering 

B.S.M.E. (1955) Wichita State University; M.S.M.E. (1959) University of Houston; 
Ph.D. (1962) Rice University 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 49 

Wilford, Michael, 1978. Visiting Professor of Architecture 

Honors Diploma ( 1 960) Northern Polytechnic School of Architecture, England; Diplo- 
ma ( 1 967) Regent Street Polytechnic Planning School 
Willcott, M. Robert, III, 1981. Adjunct Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (1955) Rice Institute; M.S. ( 1 959), Ph.D. ( 1 963) Yale University 
Williams, Edward E., 1978. Henry Gardiner Symonds Professor of Administrative 

Science and Associate of Richardson College 

B.S. (1966) University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. (1968) University of Texas 
Wilson, James L., 1966. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. ( 1 942), M.A. ( 1 944) University of Texas; Ph.D. ( 1 949) Yale University 
Wilson, John T. 1 980. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1969) Baylor University; M.A. (1971) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. 

(1978) Cornell University 
Wilson, Joseph B., 1954. Professor of German 

B.A. (1950), M.A. (1953) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1960) Stanford University 
Wilson, Lon J., 1973. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Richardson College 

B.A. (1966) Iowa State University; Ph.D. (1971) 
Wilson, Richard L., 1985. Assistant Professor of Art History and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1981) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. (1985) University of 

Kansas 
Wilson, Rick K., 1983. Associate Professor of Political Science and Statistics and 

Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1975), M.A. (1977) Creighton University; Ph.D. (1982) Indiana University 
Wilson, William L. Jr., 1972. Professor in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering and Resident Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. ( 1 965), M.S. ( 1 966), Ph.D. ( 1 972) Cornell University 
Wilson, William R., 1985. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and 

Associate of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1 968) Eastern Michigan University; M.B.A. (1985) University of Texas at Austin; 

M.A. ( 1 970), Ph.D. (1975) University of Michigan 
Windsor, Duane, 1977. Associate Professor of Administrative Science, and Associ- 
ate Dean for Student Affairs of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of 

Administration, and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1969) Rice University; A.M. (1973), Ph.D. (1978) Harvard University 
Winkler, Michael, 1967. Professor of German and Associate of Richardson 

College 

B.A. ( 1 96 1 ) St. Benedict's College; M.A. ( 1 963), Ph.D. ( 1 966) University of Colorado 
Winningham, Geoffrey L., 1 969. Professor of Art and Honorary Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.A. (1965) Rice University; M.S. (1968) Illinois Institute of Technology 
Wisoff, Peter Jeffrey K., 1987. Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer 

Engineering and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1980) University of Virginia; M.S. (1982), Ph.D. (1986) Stanford University 
Wittenberg, Gordon G., Jr., 1 979. Associate Professor of Architecture and Associ- 
ate of Richardson College 

B.F.A. ( 1 968) Trinity College, Connecticut; M.Arch. ( 1 972) Washington University 
Wolf, Michael, 1988. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. ( 1 98 1 ) Yale University; Ph.D. (1986) Stanford University 



50 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Wolf, Richard A., 1 967. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.Eng.Phys. (1962) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1966) California Institute of 

Technology 
Wolin, Richard, 1984. Associate Professor of History 

B.A. ( 1 974) Reed College; M.A. ( 1 976), Ph.D. ( 1 980) York University 
Wood, Susan, 1 98 1 . Associate Professor of English and Associate of Sid Richard- 
son College 

B.A. ( 1 968) East Texas State University; M.A. ( 1 970) University of Texas, Arlington 
Wright, Anthony A., 1980. Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A. ( 1 965) Stanford University; M.A. ( 1 970), Ph.D. ( 1 97 1 ) Columbia University 
Wu, Kenneth K. 1984. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering 

Laboratory 

M.D. (1966) National Taiwan University; M.S. (1968) Yale 
Wunder, R, Stephen, 1984. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1970) Creighton University, M.A. (1976), Ph.D. (1979) Wayne State University 
Yamal, Ricardo, 1986. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.A. (1979) Universidad Catolica, Chile; M.A. (1978), Ph.D. (1982) University of 

Pittsburgh 
Yang, Deane, 1 983. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A. (1979) University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. (1983) Harvard University 
Yatsu, Frank M., 1984. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering 

Laboratory 

A.B. (1955) Brown University; M.D. (1959) Case- Western Reserve University 
Young, Richard D., 1965. Professor of Economics and Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. ( 1 95 1 ), M. A. ( 1 954) University of Minnesota; Ph.D. ( 1 965) Carnegie Institute of 

Technology 
Yunis, Harvey E., 1987. Assistant Professor of Ancient Studies 

B.A. (1978) Dartmouth College; B.A. (1982) M.A. (1985) University of Cambridge; 

Ph.D. (1987) Harvard University 
Zammito, John Henry, 1 988. Visiting Lecturer on History 

B.A. (1970) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1978) University of California-Berkeley 
Zdatny, Steven, 1986. Floyd Seward Lear Lecturer on History and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1972), M.A. (1974) State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D. (1982) 

University of Pennsylvania 
Zeff, Stephen A,, 1 978. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Accounting and Executive 

Associate of Richardson College 

B.S. ( 1955), M.S. ( 1 957) University of Colorado; M.B.A. ( 1 960), Ph.D. ( 1 962) Universi- 
ty of Michigan 
Zimmerman, Stuart D., 1 97 1 . Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1955), Ph.D. (1961) University of Chicago 
Zodrow, George, 1 979. Associate Professor of Economics and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.A., M.M.E. ( 1 2973) Rice University; M.A. (1977) Ph.D. ( 1 980) Princeton University 
Zwaenepoel, Willy E., 1 984. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Associ- 
ate of Lovett College 

B.S. (1979) Ghent, Belgium; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1984) Stanford 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 5 1 

Zygourakis, Kyriacos, 1980. Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical 
Engineering and Associate of Jones College 

Diploma of Chemical Engineering (1975) National Technical University of Athens; 
Ph.D. ( 1 98 1 ) University of Minnesota 



Professional Research Staff 

Buchanan, J.A., 1 96 1 . Senior Research Scientist in Physics 

B.S. ( 1 970) University of Houston 
Chow, Thomas Wing-Yuk, 1984. Research Associate in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (1978) Rice University; Ph.D. (1984) Rice University 
Chu, Arthur J., 1984. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1974) Chung- Yuang University, Taiwan; Ph.D. (1981) University of Nevada 
Clement, J.M,, Jr. 1974. Research Scientist in Physics 

B.S. (1965), M.S. (1966) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1972) Renssalaer Polytechnic 

Institute 
Cooper, Keith D., 1983. Research Associate in Computer Science 

B.S. ( 1 978) Rice University; M.A. ( 1 982) Rice University Ph.D. ( 1 983) Rice University 
Emmons, Gary T., 1985. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1977) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1982) University of Pittsburgh 
Gibson, Bruce S., 1984. Research Scientist in Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. ( 1 973) Pomona College; M.S. (1975) University of Hawaii 
Gordy, Virginia R., 1986. Research Scientist in Environmental Science & 

Engineering 

B.S. (1963) Abilene Christian University; M.A. (1969) University of Colorado; Ph.D. 

( 1 972) University of Houston 
Hauge, R.H., 1967. Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.A. (1960) Loras College; Ph.D. (1965) University of California at Berkeley 
Hill, Thomas W., 1 976. Senior Research Scientist in the Center for Space Physics 

and Astronomy 

B.A. (1967); M.S. (1971); Ph.D. (1973) Rice University 
Hinterberger, Henry, 1985. Senior Research Scientist in Physics 

B.S.M.E. (1948) City College of New York 
Hollands, Judy M., 1984. Research Associate in Environmental Science & 

Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 976) American University; M.S. (1981) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1985) Cornell 
University 

Hong, Jane H., 1978. Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1962) National Taiwan Normal University; Ph.D. (1973) University of Detroit 
Johnson, Bruce, 1988. Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.A. (1975) University of Minnesota; Ph.D. (1981) University of Wisconsin 
Kan, Amy T., 1 985. Research Associate in Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.Sc. (1975) Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan; M.S. (1978); Ph.D. (1982) 

Cornell University 
Kimura, Mineo, 1984. Senior Research Associate in Physics 

B.S. (1970) Waseda University; M.S. (1972) University of Tokyo; Ph.D. 

(1981) University of Alberta 
Kisic, A., 1973. Senior Research Scientist and Departmental Administrator in 

Biochemistry 

B.S. (1954); Ph.D. (1961) University of Zagreb, Yugoslavia 



52 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Kittrell, Carter, 1988. Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.S. (1971) Allegheny College 
Ko, Chi-Ren C, 1 980. Research Associate in Mechanical Engineering & Materials 

Science 

B.S. (1968) National Taiwan Normal University; M.S. (1975) Texas A & M; Ph.D. 

(1980) University of Houston 
Kook, Alan Mark, 1 985. NMR Manager in Chemistry 

B.S. (1974) SUNY at Stonybrook; Ph.D. (1984) University of Kentucky 
Knik, Jeffrey W., 1983. Research Associate in Physics 

B.A. (1977) Princeton University; M.S. (1981) Yale University; Ph.D. (1983) Yale 

University 
Ledley, Tamara A.S., 1985. Assistant Research Scientist in the Center for Space 

Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1976) University of Maryland; Ph.D. (1983) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Mann, Thomas, 1985. Senior Research Engineer in Physics 

B.M.E. (1965) Georgia Institute of Technology 
Marriott, Terry D., 1978. Scientist and Instrument Manager in Chemistry 

B.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1976) Oklahoma State University 
Nelson, Stephen O., 1984. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1967), M.S. (1970) Northeast Louisiana State University; Ph.D. (1974) Texas 

A&M University; Ph.D. (1980) University of Amsterdam 
Pelley, Ronald P., 1985. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1968) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1975), M.D. (1976) Case Western 

Reserve University 
Pinkerton, Frederick D., 1984. Senior Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1969) Eastern Montana College; Ph.D. (1976) Montana State University 
Pyrek, Jan S., 1 984. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

M.S. (1965) Warsaw University, Poland; Ph.D. (1971) Polish Academy of Sciences 
Reiff, Patricia H., 1 976. Senior Research Scientist in the Center for Space Physics 

and Astronomy 

B.S. (1971) Oklahoma State University; M.S. ( 1 974), Ph.D. (1975) Rice University 
Sherrill, Bette C, 1987. Research Scientist and Executive Director, Institute of 

Biosciences and Bioengineering 

B.S. (1966) New Mexico State University; Ph.D. (1973) Texas Christian University 
Smith, Darwin D., 1981. Senior Research Associate in Biology 

B.S. ( 1 975); Ph.D. (1981) North Texas State University 
Smith, Ken A., 1 984. Executive Director of the Rice Quantum Institute and 

Associate Research Scientist in the Center for Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1958) University of Southern California; M.S. (1973) Rice University; Ph.D. 

(1975) Rice University 
Smith, Wayne A., 1 966. Contracts and Administrative Manager and Data Systems 

Administrator in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S.E.E. (1958) University of Southern California 
Song, Kyoo Y., 1978. Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1971) Han Yang University; M.S. (1973) University of New Mexico; Ph.D. (1978) 

Clemson University 
Spiro, Robert W., 1978. Research Scientist III in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1968) University of Dallas; Ph.D. (1978) University of Texas— Dallas 
Street, Evan H., Jr., 1987. Research Scientist in Environmental Science & 

Engineering 

B.A. ( 1 949); M.S. ( 1 95 1 ), Ph.D. (1955), University of Pennsylvania 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 5 3 

Thomas-Hollands, J. Michele, 1 984. Research Associate in Environmental Sci- 
ence & Engineering 

B.S. (1976) American University; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1983) Cornell University 
Vermilion, Janice L., 1979. Senior Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.S. (1971) University of Illinois; Ph.D. (1976) University of Michigan 
Voigt, Gerd-Hannes, 1980. Senior Research Scientist in the Center for Space 

Physics and Astronomy 

Diploma of Physics and Geophysics (1970), Ph.D. (1975) University of Braunshweig, 

Germany 
Wang, Tong, 1985. Senior Research Associate in Mechanical Engineenng 

Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Wilson, William K., 1982. Research Scientist in Biochemistry 

B.A. (1970) Earlham College; Ph.D. (1982) University of New Mexico 
Wise, J.D., 1978. Research Engineer in Electrical Engineering 

B.A. (1970). M.E.E. (1971), Ph.D. (1977) Rice University 
Yoshihara, Miehiko, 1978. Research Associate in Mechanical Engineenng & 

Materials Science 

B.A. (1967) Oita University; M.S. (1969) Wesleyan University; Ph.D. (1977) Clark 

University 

Continuing Studies and Special Programs 
Program Development Staff 

Carlson, Edith, 1978. Director of Programs 

B.S. (1976) Georgia Tech 
Hsu, Laura, 1980. Director of Programs 

Ph.D. (1980) University of Miami 
Mclndre, Mary, 1975. Dean 

Ph.D. ( 1 975) Rice University 
Sayers-Olivares, Kathleen, 1983. Director of Language Programs 

Ph.D. (1981) University of Texas 



Professional Staff of the Fondren Library 

Adler, Marianne G., 1974. Director Emerita, Division of Processing Services 

B.A. (1973) Rice University; M.L.S. (1974) University of Texas; M.A. (1977) Rice 

University 
Baber, Elizabeth Ann, 1965. Data Base Management Librarian 

B.A. (1960) Rice University; M.L.S. (1961) University of California at Berkeley 
Boothe, Nancy L., 1 965. Director of the Woodson Research Center and University 

Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1952) Rice Institute; M.S.L.S. (1965) Catholic University of America; M.A. 

(1979) Rice University 
Carrington, Samuel M., Jr. 1967. Professor of French, University Librarian, 

University Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (I960), M.A. (1962), Ph.D. (1965) University of North Carolina 
Caswell, Jean L., 1986. Automation Librarian 

B.A. (1974) New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; M.A.L.S. (1976) North- 
em Illinois University 



54 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Charles, Elizabeth D., 1983. Executive Director, Friends of Fondren 

B.A. (1963) University of Texas 
Edwards, Sandra E., 1985. Humanities Librarian 

B.A. (1980) Grinnell College; M.A. (1982), M.A.L.S. (1984) University of Missouri 
Flowers, Kay A., 1 978. Assistant University Librarian for Automated Services 

B.A. ( 1 977) Rice University; M.S. ( 1 984) University of Illinois 
Fry, Michael F., 1986. Manuscript Librarian 

B.A. ( 1 977) Westminster College; M.A. ( 1979) Tulane University 
Gourlay, Una M., 1986. Director, Division of Community Services 

B.Sc. (1958) University of Glasgow 
Halbert, Martin D., 1988. Automation and Reference Librarian 

B.A. (1984) Rice University; M.L.I.S. (1987) University of Texas 
Hatfield, Joseph W., 1 984. Director of Access Services 

A.A. ( 1 966) Lon Morris College 
Henebry, Carolyn L., 1987. Bibliographic Instruction Librarian 

B.S. (1955) Illinois State University; M.Ed. (1962) University of Illinois- MSLS 

(1986) North Texas State University , • . . . 

Hyman, Feme B., 1968. Assistant University Librarian for Collection Manage- 
ment and University Associate of Baker College 

B.A. ( 1 948) University of California at Los Angeles; M. A. ( 1 969) Loyola University of 

Los Angeles; M.S.L.S. (1969) University of Illinois 
Keck, Kerry A., 1985. Government Publications Librarian 

B.A. (1980) University of Colorado; M.S.L.S. (1982) University of Illinois 
Kile, Barbara, 1971. Director, Division of Government Publications and Special 

Resources 

B.A. (1967), M.S.L.S. (1968) University of Illinois 
Kuo, Jiun-Huei Chern, 1985. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (1978) National Taiwan University; A.M.L.S. (1982) University of Michigan 
Lowman, Sara, 1985. Coordinator for Collection Development and Pure and 

Applied Sciences Librarian 

B.A. (1984) Carleton College, M.A.L.I.S. (1985) University of Iowa 
Marsales, Rita, 1973. Catalog Maintenance Librarian 

B.A. (1957) Louisiana State University; M.L.S. (1973) University of Texas 
Perrine, Richard H., 1 960. Assistant University Librarian for Planning and Ad- 
junct Associate Professor of Architecture, Emeritus 

B.F.A. (1940) Yale University; M.L.S. (1961) University of Texas; B.A (1977) Wash- 
ington University; M.A.L.S. (1981) University of Missouri 
Prendeville, Jet Marie, 1979. Art and Architecture Librarian 

B.A. (1972) Memphis State University; M.A. (1975) University of Michigan- MSLS 

(1979) University of Illinois 
Redmon, Alice Jane, 1 962. Special Processing Librarian Emerita 

B.A. (1937) University of Denver 
Robnett, William E., 1982. Director, Division of Reader Services 

B.S. (1971), M.S. (1973) Texas Tech University; M.L.S. (1980) University of Texas 
Rodell, Elizabeth, 1 947. Assistant University Librarian for Technical Services 

Emerita 

B.A. (1932) Rice Institute; B.S.L.S. ( 1 940) University of Denver 

Schwartz, Charles A., 1987. Social Sciences Librarian 

B.A. (1968) Denison University; Ph.D. (1972) University of Virginia; M.L S (1985) 
Indiana University. 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 5 5 

Shaw, Peggy A., 1 986. Business Librarian 

B.A. (1970), B.S. (1972) Louisiana State University; M.L.S. (1982) North Texas State 

University 
Silversteen, Sophy, 1965. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (1952) Rice Institute; M.S.S.W. (1954), M.L.S. (1965) University of Texas 
Tibbits, Randolph K., 1987. Information Librarian 

B.A. (1970); M.A. (1977) Washington University; M.L.S. (1980) University of Texas 
Wetzel, Shirley, 1 983. Cataloging Librarian 

A.A. (1960) Navarro College; B.A. (1968) Texas Technological College; M.A. (1980) 

Rice University 
Zingler, Gilberta, 1953. Acquisitions Librarian Ementa 

A.B. (1932) Butler University; B.L.S. (1935) University of Illinois 



Professional Staff of the Institute 
for Computer Services and Applications 

Case, John E., 1984. Programmer/ Analyst 

B.S. (1983) University of Houston 
Deuel, John R., 1 987, Systems Programmer 
Fields, Corinne V., 1 968. Manager of Programmmg and Data Control 

B.B.A. (Southern Methodist University) 
Garcia, Raymond A., 1979. Programmer/Analyst 
Goodman, Sara L., 1979. Systems Programmer 

B.S. (1965) Brooklyn College 
Haenggi, Sara, 1987. Programmer/ Analyst 

B.S. (1984) University of California, Berkeley 
Halbert, Martin D., 1988. Computing Resources Librarian 

B.A. (1984) Rice University; M.L.I.S. (1987) University of Texas (Austin) 
Huston, Priscilla Jane, 1969. Director 

B.A. ( 1 964) Mount Holyoke College 
Kittrell, Aubery, 1987. Programmer/ Analyst 

B.A. (1974) University of West Florida 
Martin, Andrea M., 1979. Manager, Resource Center 

B.S.E.E. (1979), M.Mus. (1984) Rice University 
McKinin, Katherine, 1985. Resource Center Programmer 

B.A. (1976), M.A. (1978) Indiana University; M.B.A. (1983) University of Missouri 
Naman, John L., 1985. Systems Programmer 

B.A. (1974) Rice University 
Rao, Luke C, 1985. Programmer/ Analyst 
Richard, Charles A., 1973. Manager, Operations 
Richardson, J.R., 1985. Resource Center Programmer 

B.S.C.E. (1974), M.Ch.E. (1974), M.B.A. (1986) Rice University 
Russell, Kenneth, 1988. Resource Center Programmer 

B.S. (1978) Prairie View 
Schafer, Richard A., 1974. Manager Systems Support 

B.A. (1973) M.A.M.S. (1974) Rice University 
Smith, Nina E., 1987. Resource Center User Assistant 

B A. (1985) University of Delaware 
Williamson, Mark R., 1971. Assistant to the Director for Technical Affairs 



56 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Staff of the Health Service 

Backes, Susan, M.D., 1985. Codirector, Counseling and Psychiatric Service 

B.S. (1972) University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.D. (1979) Louisiana State 

University 
Deen, L. Stanley, M.D., 1982. Codirector, Counseling and Psychiatric Service 

B.A. ( 1 974), M.D. ( 1 978) University of Arkansas 
Fullen, Dollie, L.V.N., 1959. Nurse 
Medford, Pam, 1985. Nurse 
Novak, Dain, M.D., 1981. Codirector of the Student Health Service 

M.B.B.Ch. (1969) University of Witwatersrand, South Africa 
Schnee, Amanda M., M.D., 1981. Codirector of the Student Health Service 

M.B., Ch.B. (1968) St. Andrews University, Scotland 



Staff of the Athletic Department 

Berndt, Jerry L., 1986. Director of Athletics and Head Football Coach 

B.S. ( 1 962) Bowling Green State University; M.S. ( 1 969) University of Toledo 
Blankenship, D. Paul, 1 980. Women's Tennis Coach 

B.A. (1972) Texas Christian University 
Butler, James E., M.D,, 1977. Chief Team Physician 

B.S. ( 1 956) Sewanee College; M.A. (1957) Southwest Texas State; M.D. ( 1 962) Univer- 
sity of Texas 
Castaneda, James A., 1961. Faculty Representative and Golf Coach 

B.A. (1954) Drew University; M.A. (1955) Yale University; Ph.D. (1958) Yale 

University 
Cousins, William A., 1983. Assistant Athletic Director/Media Relations 

B.S. ( 1 97 1 ) New Mexico State 
Eggert, Allen, 1968. Head Athletic Trainer 

B.S. (1963) Rice University; M.A. (1967) California Western University 
Griswold, Julie L. 1986. Academic Coordinator. 

B.A. (1981) Miami University; B.S. (1981) Miami University; M.S. (1986) Indiana 

University 
Hall, David H., 1 980. Head Baseball Coach 

B.S. (1971) University of Texas 
Harris, James E., 1986. Assistant Athletic Director/Development 

B.S. (1971) Bowling Green State University 
Hawthorne, Martha E., 1979. Assistant Athletic Director for Women 

B.A. (1960), B.S. (1961), M.S. (1964) Louisiana State University 
Irwin, Keith, 1983. Weight and Strength Coach 

B.S. (1979) Fort Hays State University 
Long, Jeffrey P., 1 988. Assistant Athletic Director for Recruiting 

B.A. ( 1 982) Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A. (1983) Miami University 
Lopez, Victor M., 1980. Head Women's Track and Field Coach 

B.S. (1971) University of Houston; M.S. ( 1 975) Texas Southern University 
May, John Robert, 1967. Associate Athletic Director 

B.S. (1965) Rice University 
Moniaci, Steve, 1980. Assistant Athletic Director for Administration 

B.S. (1975) Ball State University; M.S. ( 1 976) Ohio University 
Scheid, Mark, 1984. Academic Advisor for Student Athletes 

B.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1972) Rice Univershy 



INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH STAFF 5 7 

Sokol, Debra L., 1980. Head Volleyball Coach 

B. A. ( 1 980) University of Houston 
Steele, David B., 1 984. Athletic Business Manager 

B.A. (1982) Rice University; M.A. (1984) Ohio University 
Straub, Stephen M., 1974. Head Men's Track and Field Coach 

B.A. ( 1 972) Rice University 
Thompson, G. Scott, 1987. Head Men's Basketball Coach 

B.A. ( 1 976) University of Iowa 
Tucker, Linda G., 1 978. Head Women's Basketball Coach 

B.S. (1969) Wayland Baptist University 
Turville, Lawrence C, 1979. Men's Tennis Coach 

B.S. (1971) Georgia Tech 
Wingenroth, Kristin B., 1983. Swimming Coach 

B.A. (1976) Rice University; M.Ed. (1983) University of Houston 



58 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

University Standing Committees 
for 1988-89 



The president is an ex officio member of all committees. 

Committee on Admission 
Committee on Affirmative Action 

Committee on Campus Safety 

Committee of the College Masters 

Committee on Community Affairs 

Committee on Computers 

Education Council 

Committee on Examinations and Standing 

Committee on Fringe Benefits 

Faculty Council 

Graduate Council 

Committee on the Library 

Committee on Public Lectures 

Committee on Religious Activities 

Research Council 

Residential College Management Advisory Committee 

Rice University Athletics Committee 

Rice University Marshals 

Rice University Press Review Board 

ROTC Committee 

Committee on Scholarships and Awards 

Committee on Student Affairs 

Committee on Student Financial Aid 

Committee on Student Health 

Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum 

Committee on Undergraduate Teaching 

University Council 

University Review Board 



Chairs and Lectureships 



Throughout its history, Rice University has been especially fortunate in the 
number of its friends and benefactors. Some of these are memorialized in the 
names of buildings and special physical facilities; others have generously provided 
for the enrichment of the University's intellectual life by establishing chairs and 
lectureships either on a temporary or permanent basis. Rice takes pleasure in 
recognizing on these pages some of these contributors to its academic excellence. 

J. S. Abercrombie Chair in the School of Engineering 



CHAIRS AND LECTURESHIPS 59 

Agnes CuUen Arnold Chair in Humanities 

Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Administration 

Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Humanities 

Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Humanities 

Herbert S. Autrey Chairs in Social Sciences 

Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Humanities — Music 

Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Management 

Brown and Root Chair in Engineering 

George R. Brown Chair in Administration 

Herman and George R. Brown Chair in Civil Engineering 

Andrew Hays Buchanan Chairs in Astrophysics 

D. R. Bullard — Welch Foundation Chair in Science 

E. D. Butcher Chairs 

Louis Calder Chair in Chemical Engineering 

Harry S. Cameron Chair in Mechanical Engineering 

Harry and Hazel Chavanne Chair in Religious Studies 

Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Chair in Economics and Finance 

Carey Croneis Chair in Geology 

Craig Francis CuUinan Chair 

G. C. Evans Instructorships in Mathematics 

W. Maurice Ewing Chair in Oceanography 

Laurence H. Favrot Chair in French 

Henry S. Fox, Sr., Chair in Economics 

Gladys Louise Fox Chair in English 

Lena Gohlman Fox Chair in Political Science 

Foyt Family Chair in Engineering 

Gene and Norman Hackerman Chair in Chemistry 

Noah Harding Chairs in Mathematics 

Noah Harding Chair in Computer Science 

Reginald Henry Hargrove Chair in Economics 

A. J. Hartsook Chair in Chemical Engineering 

William Pettus Hobby Chair in American History 

Jesse H. Jones Chair in Management 

Mary Gibbs Jones Chair in History 

W. M. Keck Foundation Chair in Geophysics 

William Alexander Kirkland Chair in Administration 

Ralph and Dorothy Looney Chair 

Edgar Odell Lovett Chair in Mathematics 

Henry R. Luce Chair in Engineering Psychology 

Samuel G. McCann Chair in History 

Carolyn and Fred McManis Chair in Philosophy 

Burton J. and Ann M. McMurtry Chair in the School of Engineering 

Harris Masterson, Jr., Chair in History 

Andrew W. Mellon Junior Humanities Scholars 

Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities 

Libbie Sheam Moody Chair in English 

W. L. Moody, Jr., Chair in Mathematics 

Stanley C. Moore Chair in Engineering 

Joseph and Joanna Nazro Mullen Chair in Fine Arts 



60 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF i 

H. Joe Nelson III Chair in the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of 

Administration 

George A. Peterkin Chair in Political Economy 

Milton B. Porter Chair in Mathematics 

J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought 

Lewis B. Ryon Chair in Engineering 

The Schlumberger Chair in Advanced Studies and Research 

Elma Schneider Chair in Music 

Harry K. and Albert K. Smith Chair in Architecture 

Dorothy Richard Starling Chair in Classical Violin 

Henry Gardiner Symonds Chair in Administration 

Albert Thomas Chair in Political Science 

Radoslav A. Tsanoff Chair in Public Affairs 

William Gaines Twyman Chair in History 

Isla and Percy Turner Chair in Biblical Studies 

Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry 

Harmon Whittington Chair in Administration 

Harry Carothers Wiess Chair in Geology 

Sam and Helen Worden Chair in Physics 

Gus Sessions Wortham Chair in Architecture 

Brown Foundation — J. Newton Rayzor Lectures 

Carroll Camden Lectureship in English Literature 

William Wayne Caudill Lecture Series in Architecture 

English Department Distinguished Professor Lectureship 

Joe L. Franklin Lectureship in Physical Chemistry 

W. V. Houston Lectureship 

Ervin Frederick Kalb Lectureship in History 

Thomas W. Leland Visiting Lectureship in Chemical Engineering 

The Rockwell Lectures 

The Harold E. and Margaret R. Rorschach Memorial Lectures in Legal History 

Tsanoff Lectureship in the Humanities 

Dr. Thomas J. and Jane A. Vanzant Lectureship 



Information for 

Undergraduate 

Students 



Degree Requirements, 
Majors, and Curricula 



All degrees conferred by Rice University, both graduate and undergraduate, 
are awarded solely in recognition of educational attainments, not as warranty of 
future employment or admission to other programs of higher education. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree at Rice is awarded with a designated major in 
some field of architecture, the humanities, music, social sciences, science, engi- 
neering, or with an interdepartmental major in managerial and policy studies. The 
general University requirements for the B. A. degree, as well as the options open to 
students in their choice of majors, are described below. 

The Bachelor of Music is offered by the Shepherd School of Music. In 
addition, it is offered in conjunction with the Master of Music, both of which are 
awarded simultaneously on completion of a five-year program of professional 
studies. 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration offers accelerated 
"five-year" master's degree plans in accounting and management which may be 
combined with any undergraduate major. Rice undergraduates may also complete 
the Master of Accounting program in one year of graduate study if they have taken 
a prescribed set of prerequisite courses by the end of their senior year (please see 
pp. 75 and 147 for information). 

The various engineering departments also offer the Bachelor of Science degree 
which, like the B.A., normally requires four years for completion. 

For students interested in teaching in secondary schools, a program of teacher 
training leading to state certification may be completed together with the B.A. 
degree. This program is administered by the Department of Education. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 63 

Programs that satisfy the requirements for admission to medical, dental, or 
law school are available in conjunction with the various majors. 

Degree Requirements and Majors 

Graduation and University Credit Requirements 

Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must pass a minimum of 1 20 
semester hours. In establishing an undergraduate major for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree, departments must specify a minimum of 1 8 semester hours for majors in 
the humanities and social sciences and a minimum of 24 semester hours for majors 
in science. No department may specify more than 80 semester hours (related 
laboratories, required courses, and prerequisites included). For a Bachelor of Arts 
degree in any discipline other than architecture students must pass a minimum of 
60 semester hours in addition to major requirements specified by their depart- 
ment. Architecture majors must pass at least 38 semester hours in addition to their 
major requirements. 

To fulfill the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the 
several branches of engineering, with the exception of chemical engineering, 
students must pass no fewer than 134 semester hours. Students fulfilling the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering must pass up to 
137 semester hours, depending on accreditation requirements. In establishing a 
departmental major for the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the various 
branches of engineering, with the exception of chemical engineering, no depart- 
ment may specify more than 92 semester hours (required courses, prerequisites, 
and related laboratories included). In establishing the departmental major for the 
B.S. in chemical engineering, the department may specify no more than the 
semester hours necessary to meet the requirements of the accrediting agency, up to 
a maximum total of 104 semester hours (required courses, prerequisites, and 
related laboratories included). 

For either bachelor's degree, no fewer than 48 semester hours completed in 
fulfillment of the degree requirements must be on an advanced level (numbered 
300 or higher) and more than 50 percent of these hours must be completed at Rice. 
Furthermore, students must complete more than 50 percent of the advanced level 
requirements in their major field at Rice. Within major requirements, depart- 
ments may specify that a higher proportion of advanced level work must be taken 
at Rice. 

After students have fulfilled University distribution requirements and the 
requirements for a designated major, all remaining courses in their degree pro- 
grams are free electives. 

Transfer students must be registered at Rice for at least four full semesters 
during the fall and spring terms and must complete not less than 60 semester hours 
for a Rice degree. 

To be recommended for graduation, all students must complete their degree 
requirements with a minimum GPA of 1.67 in all Rice courses and a minimum 
GPA of 2.00 for those courses presented in fulfillment of their major requirements. 
Students must be registered with the University in the semester immediately 
preceding the awarding of their degrees. Students who have completed their degree 
requirements in the summer or fall prior to that semester or who are completing 
their senior year at another college or university by special arrangement with the 



64 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Committee on Examinations and Standing must register in order to be listed as 
degree candidates. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews student records at the 
time of graduation and recommends to the faculty outstanding students to be 
granted degrees cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude. 

University Distribution Requirements 

In April 1 987 the faculty of the University approved a new set of distribution 
requirements which become effective in the academic year 1988-89. Incoming 
students will be required to fulfill the new requirements. Continuing students may 
elect to fulfill the new requirements or those that were in effect at the time of their 
matriculation. 

Distribution Requirements for Students Entering in 1988 

1. Students entering Rice University in the fall of 1988 will be the first 
who must satisfy a new set of distribution requirements for the purposes of 
graduation. These requirements are designed to improve the general educa- 
tion of undergraduates by providing exposure to widely varying academic 
disciplines. To this end, each student must successfully complete foundation 
courses in areas that lie outside his or her major. In addition, each student 
must choose from designated subject groups a prescribed number of courses, 
either by electing them all for their individual interest or by electing some in 
a related sequence called a coherent minor. Coherent minors will help stu- 
dents to explore subjects in depth and to appreciate the cumulative or 
interrelated character of knowledge. Foundation courses will be in place 
beginning in the fall of 1988. Coherent minors will be in place beginning in 
the fall of 1989. Successful complefion of a coherent minor will be noted on 
a student's transcript. 

2. Students will satisfy distribution requirements by taking approved 
distribution courses in the following subject groups: 

Group I. Literature and language, art and art history, classics, philosophy 
(except logic), religion, music, and humanities. 

Group II. Economics, history, political science, anthropology, linguistics, 
psychology, and sociology. 

Group III. Biological science, physical science, engineering, mathematics, 
mathematical sciences, logic, statistics, and computer science. 

3. Distribution Requirements by Major. 

A. Majors in Group I and Group II Subjects. 
1 . Foundation Courses (6 semester hours). 

Natural Science 101, 102. These courses will provide an intro- 
duction to the principles underlying physics, chemistry, and 
mathematics. Students who have successfully completed one 
semester of Mathematics (any calculus course), one semester of 
Physics (101, 102, 121, 122), and one semester of Chemistry 
(101, 102) — or who have received three hours of advanced 
placement in each of these three areas — are not required 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 65 

to take Natural Science 101,102. Students who have success- 
fully completed two semesters (or six hours of advanced 
placement credit) in any two of these areas — are also not 
required to take Natural Science 101,102. 

2. Additional Distribution Requirements for Group I Majors 
( 1 8 semester hours). 

Option (a): Students not electing a coherent minor must success- 
fully complete any two approved courses in Group III and any 
four approved courses in Group II. 

Option (b): Students electing a coherent minor must successful- 
ly complete an approved sequence of three related courses in 
Group III and any three approved courses in Group II. 

3. Additional Distribution Requirements for Group II Majors 
( 1 8 semester hours). 

Option (a): Students not electing a coherent minor must success- 
fully complete any two approved courses in Group III and any 
four approved courses in Group I. 

Option (b): Students electing a coherent minor must successful- 
ly complete an approved sequence of three related courses in 
Group III and any three approved courses in Group I. 

B. Majors in Group III Subjects. 

1 . Foundation Courses (9 semester hours). 

(a) Humanities 101 and 102 (6 semester hours). These courses 
will introduce students to disciplines in the humanities and arts 
by studying representative works of Western culture from an- 
cient Greece through the modern era. 

(b) Social Science 1 02 (3 semester hours). This course will offer a 
broad historical introduction to thought about human society. 

2. Additional Distribution Requirements ( 1 5 semester hours). 
Option (a): Students not electing a coherent minor must success- 
fully complete any three approved courses from Group II and 
any two approved courses from Group I. 

Option (b): Students electing a coherent minor have three 
choices. They may: 

( 1 ) choose an approved sequence of three related courses in 
Group I, plus any two approved courses in Group II, 

(2) choose an approved sequence of four courses in Group II, 
plus any one approved course in Group I, 

(3) choose an approved sequence of courses from both Group I 
and Group II. Students electing such minors will be re- 
quired to complete successfully four approved courses, in- 
cluding the foundation courses, in each Group. 

C. Architecture and Music Majors. 

1 . Foundation courses ( 1 5 semester hours). 

(a) Humanities 101, 102 

(b) Social Science 102 

(c) Natural Science 101, 102 

2. Additional Distribution Requirements (21 semester hours). 
Option (a): Students not electing a coherent minor must success- 
fully complete any two approved courses in Group I, any three 



66 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

approved courses in Group II and any two approved courses in 
Group III. Music students may use music courses to satisfy the 
Group I requirements. 

Option (b): Students may elect a coherent minor from either 
Group I, Group II, or Group III. 

(1) Students electing a Group I coherent minor of three related 
courses must also successfully complete any two approved 
courses in Group II and any two approved courses in Group III. 
Music students may not include music courses in a Group I 
coherent minor. 

(2) Students electing a Group II coherent minor of four related 
courses must also successfully complete any one approved 
course in Group I (automatically satisfied for music majors) and 
any two approved courses in Group III. 

(3) Students electing a Group III coherent minor of three related 
courses must also successfully complete either 

(a) two approved courses in Group I (automatically satis- 
fied for music majors) and two in Group II or 

(b) one approved course in Group I (automatically satisfied 
for music majors) and three in Group II. 

D. Other Majors 

1 . Human Performance/Health Sciences. 
Same as Group I majors. 

2. Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations. 
Same as Group I majors. 

3. Policy and Managerial Studies. 
Same as Group II majors. 

4. Area majors. To be determined at the time of approval. 

4. The list of individual courses approved for distribution is updated 
annually. Approved courses are designated in the Schedule of Courses of- 
fered, published by the Registrar. A complete list of approved distribution 
courses is also available in the Registrar's Office and in the Office of Student 
Advising. Courses fulfill distribution requirements provided they are taken at 
the time they are on the approved list. Individual appeals are heard by the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing. Information on designated coher- 
ent minors will be made available by the Registrar before the 1989-90 
academic year. 

5. The first semester of a beginning language course will not count 
toward the distribution requirements without completion of the second se- 
mester. 

6. A student who double majors in a Group I or Group II discipline 
and a Group III discipline is not required to take any of the foundation 
courses. Such students must successfully complete four courses each in Group 
I, Group II, and Group III to satisfy the distribution requirement. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 67 

Distribution Requirements for Students Who Entered Prior to the Fall of 
1988 

1 . Before graduation all students in majors other than architecture or health 
and physical education must complete three or more semester hours from at least 
five of the six subject categories listed below and at least 12 semester hours from 
each of the subject categories designated by a Roman numeral. 

I. 1. Literature and language 

2. Art and art history, classics, music, philosophy (except logic), 
religion, and humanities 
IL 3. Economics, history, and political science 

4. Anthropology, linguistics, psychology, and sociology 
in. 5. Biological science, physical science, and engineering 

6. Mathematics, mathematical sciences, logic, statistics, and computer 
science 
Note that not all courses offered in the above fields are acceptable for 
distribution. 

2. Students offering a major only in architecture or in health and physical 
education must complete three or more semester hours from at least five of the 
above six subject categories. They must complete at least 12 semester hours from 
each of two of the three pairs of subject categories designated by a Roman numeral 
and six semester hours from the third. 

3. The list of courses approved for distribution will be updated annually. 
Courses will count toward satisfaction of distribution requirements only if they 
appeared on the approved list at the time they were taken. Individual appeals 
concerning distribution credit will be heard by the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing. 

4. The first semester of a beginning language course will not count toward the 
distribution requirements without completion of the second semester. 



Skills 

English Competency Requirement. Every Rice student must demonstrate 
competency in English comprehension and composition. This requirement is 
satisfied by passing the English composition examination administered by the 
Department of English to all entering students during orientation week. Students 
who fail to pass this test are required to enroll in English 1 03, a one-semester course 
in composition which carries both degree and distribution credit. Satisfactory 
completion of this course then fulfills the English competency requirement. 

Physical Education. Each student must pass two semester courses in basic 
health and physical education, although these courses do not count toward the 
semester hours required for a degree. Handicapped students may satisfy this 
requirement by taking individual instruction or classes arranged specifically to 
meet their needs. 



68 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Departmental Majors and Honors Programs 

Students normally designate a major before preliminary registration for the 
junior year. To assist students with this selection. Majors Day is held early in the 
spring semester. Departments and preprofessional offices provide information 
about their programs at a central location. Once a student declares a major, the 
department or title of the major is then noted on the student's transcript and a 
faculty adviser is assigned. Introductory courses taken before formal designation 
of a major may be counted in fulfilling the major requirements. 

In order to receive a bachelor's degree, a student must complete the require- 
ments for at least one major. Students declare their major using a form provided by 
the Registrar. The department chair or designee must sign the form acknowledging 
the declaration. It is expected that the department will counsel the student about 
the requirements that must be met and the likelihood the student will be able to 
meet them. If the department believes a student is not well prepared for success in 
its major, it may express its reservations on the form. No department or program 
may, however, refuse to admit an undergraduate as a major, with the exception of 
the School of Architecture and the Shepherd School of Music or in the case of 
limitations of resources. In such cases departments must publish criteria they will 
use to limit the number of majors together with their major requirements. Students 
normally declare a major at the end of the sophomore year, and will not be 
permitted to register for the second semester of the junior year without having 
declared a major. Students are always free to change majors in the junior or senior 
year, although this may entail one or more additional semesters at the University. 
Students and their advisers should regularly review progress toward their degrees. 

For information on the specific requirements for any departmental major, 
students should consult the departmental listings under Courses of Instruction and 
seek the advice of a faculty member in the department. 

Undergraduate honors programs are open to qualified students, with depart- 
mental approval, in several departments. Through small classes and seminars, 
independent reading or research projects, and close contact with faculty research, 
students in an honors program may accelerate study in their major fields and, in 
some cases, enter graduate courses. Information on the qualifications for admis- 
sion and the content of honors programs may be found in the departmental listings 
under Courses of Instruction. 



Second Four-year Bachelor's degree 

Both currently enrolled and former Rice students already holding a bachelor's 
degree from Rice may earn a second different four-year bachelor's degree from 
Rice. 

Students already enrolled at Rice may begin work on a second four-year 
bachelor's degree before completion of the first: 

1. by being accepted for the second major by the major department and 
fulfilling all requirements for the second degree; 

2. by completing a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at Rice 
beyond the hours required for their first degree, to be applied to the 
second degree. 

Current Rice students seeking admission to this program should apply to the 
Registrar. The application should include a written statement of both proposed 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 69 

majors, and a course program for each. This statement should also contain a 
notation of approval from the chairman or undergraduate advisor from each 
department concerned, indicating that all major degree requirements will be 
satisfied with the proposed course program. Student's holding a bachelor's degree 
from Rice may earn a different four-year bachelor's degree from Rice: 

1 . by being accepted for the major by the major department and fulfilling all 
requirements for the second degree; 

2. by completing a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at Rice 
beyond their first bachelor's degree to be applied to the second degree; 

3. by attending in full-time residence at Rice for at least two semesters 
during the fall or spring terms beyond their first bachelor's degree. 

Former Rice students seeking admission to this program should apply to the 
Registrar. The application should include a written statement of the proposed 
major and course program for the second degree, a supporting letter from the 
chairman of the major department, and an explanation of the student's reasons for 
seeking a second degree. 

Students with a bachelor's degree from schools other than Rice may earn a 
four-year bachelor's degree in a different major from Rice. 

1 . by being accepted for the major by the major department and fulfilling all 
requirements for the second degree; 

2. by completing a minimum of 60 semester hours at Rice to be applied to 
their Rice degree; 

3. by attending in full-time residence at Rice for at least four semesters 
during the fall or spring term. 

Students with a bachelor's degree from schools other than Rice should apply 
for admission to the admission office and will be considered according to the 
procedures and criteria for transfer students. Their application for admission must 
include all the materials listed above for applicants who are former Rice students 
plus an official transcript of the first degree. 

Courses completed at Rice as a Class III student may be applied to a second 
undergraduate degree only on approval by the major department for that degree. 

Information concerning financial aid available to participants in the second 
degree program may be secured from the financial aid office. Students admitted to 
the second degree program may request to be assigned to a College but will have 
lower priority for on-campus housing than students enrolled for a first four-year 
bachelor's program. The expectation is that such space will probably not be 
available. 



Summer School 

Rice Summer School offers a variety of credit programs for Rice students, 
visiting undergraduates, graduate students and Class III students (non-degree 
graduate program). Admission is automatic for any Rice undergraduate or gradu- 
ate student in good standing. Other students will need to send official transcripts 
(mailed directly from their universities and colleges to the Office of Continuing 
Studies) and to complete an application. Six to eight credit hours is considered to 
be a full load. All applicants should submit their applications with a $25 fee and a 
$ 1 5 per credit hour deposit by the May 1 5 deadline (earlier for certain courses and 
excursions). Because the Summer Program operates on a cost-return basis it is 



70 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

essential that students apply by the deadhne. Courses that do not generate an 
enrollment sufficient to pay costs by the deadline may be canceled. Students will 
have the option of enrolling in another comparable course or receiving a refund. 
Late applications will be accepted through early June, with an additional $25 late 
fee. 

Tuition ($ 1 40 per credit hour in 1 988) must be paid before classes begin. The 
session begins the second week of June for most courses. Very limited financial aid 
is available for Rice students only. Auditing is permitted only with full payment of 
tuition and fees. 

For more information, please contact the Rice Summer Program at (7 1 3) 520- 
6022 or 527-4803. 



Areas of Study 



Architecture 



Students interested in architecture may choose from programs leading to 
either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The Bachelor of 
Arts requires four years of study with a major in either architecture or architectural 
studies. Students who have completed or will complete the four-year B.A. with a 
major in architecture may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Architecture 
program. 

During the fifth year, the student is normally assigned to a working preceptor- 
ship with an architect or architectural firm and then returns to Rice to complete a 
sixth year of architectural study for the degree. (Note that the major in architectur- 
al studies does not lead to the B.Arch.) The School of Architecture encourages 
students to weigh their educational objectives and to choose among alternative 
courses of study offered. Further information on these programs may be found 
under Architecture in the Courses of Instruction section. 



Engineering 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice offers, through its seven 
departments, opportunities for a variety of curriculum and degree choices. Stu- 
dents interested in the engineering profession may major in chemical engineering, 
civil engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, mathematical sciences, 
mechanical engineering, or materials science and engineering for both undergrad- 
uate and graduate degrees. They may also take a double major combining environ- 
mental science with another science or engineering field. These programs lead to 
either the B.A. or B.S. degree and may qualify students for further study leading to 
a fifth-year professional master's degree, a Master of Science degree, or a Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. 

During the first two years, engineering students should consult with the chairs 
of the departments of interest or with the special first and second-year advisers 
appointed by each department for information and advice about details of the 
programs and choice of electives and about engineering as a profession. 

Students may take a program of study during their first year which satisfies the 
first year requirements for all engineering departments. A listing of these courses 
and other information regarding the first two years of study is found under 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 7 1 

Engineering and Applied Science in the Courses of Instruction section of this 
catalog. Degree requirements and advanced courses are listed under the separate 
departmental listings in the same section. 



Humanities 

In the School of Humanities, majors are offered in art and art history, classics, 
English, French, German, health and physical education, history, linguistics, 
philosophy, religious studies, Russian, and Spanish. 

An interdepartmental major in policy studies, which combines courses from 
the School of Humanities and the School of Social Sciences, is described below. 

The requirements of each major may be found in the departmental listings 
under Courses of Instruction and are also available from the department chair and 
from the Registrar's Office. 

Two special programs, the Program in the Humanities and the Joint Venture 
Program, are also described in the Courses of Instruction under the heading 
Humanities. 



Social Sciences 

The School of Social Sciences offers majors in anthropology, behavioral 
science, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. 

The interdepartmental major policy studies, which overlaps both the School 
of Social Sciences and the School of Humanities, is outlined below. The manageri- 
al studies major, which overlaps the School of Social Sciences, the Jones School, 
and the School of Engineering, is described below. 

The requirements of each major may be found in the departmental listings 
under Courses of Instruction and are also available from the department chair and 
from the Registrar's Office. 



72 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



School 
Department 



Degrees Offered 



Additional Options, Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

Artand Art History B.A., B.F.A.. M.A. 


Art history, studio art. archaeology, film and 
photography 


Education 


Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing 


Teacher preparatory programs in 2 1 subject 
areas 


English 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 




French and 
Italian 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
None 




German and 
Slavic Studies 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
B.A. 




Human Performance 
and Health Sciences 


B.A. 


Physical education: sport science, sport 
medicine, sport management, teaching, coach- 
ing; health education as teaching field only 


History 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 




Linguistics 


B.A., Ph.D. 


Anthropological, English, Germanic, and Ro- 
mance linguistics; semiotics, cognitive and 
computational linguistics 


Philosophy 


B.A.,M.A., Ph.D. 




Religious Studies 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 




Spanish 
Portuguese and 
Classics 


B.A., M.A., 

None 
B.A. 


Language and literature, language, 

Latin American studies 

Classics (Greek and Latin) and Latin 


U lESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biochemistry B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. 


Biochemistry, biophysical chemistry, molecu- 
lar biology 


Biology 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Biology, physiology, comparative biochemis- 
try, developmental genetics, ecology, cell biolo- 
gy, neurobiology, molecular biology, animal 
behavior, plant biology 


Chemistry 


B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 


Chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chem- 
istry, inorganic chemistry, chemical physics 



Geology and 
Geophysics 



B.A. in Geology; B.A. in 
Geophysics; M.A., Ph.D. 



Stratigraphy, sedimentation, sedimentary pe- 
trology, marine geology-oceanography, carbon- 
ate petrology, igneous petrology, geochemistry, 
meteoritics and planetology, structural geolo- 
gy, regional tectonics, rock mechanics, reflec- 
tion seismology, and geodynamics. 



Mathematics 



B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 



Complex analysis, partial differential equa- 
tions, mathematical physics, differential geom- 
etry, lie groups, topological dynamics, ergodic 
theory, geometric topology, algebraic topology, 
global analysis 



Physics 



B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 



B.A. options: Physics, applied physics, bio- 
physics, chemical physics, geophysics, and 
space physics and astronomy. M.A. and Ph.D. 
areas: Atomic and molecular physics, biophys- 
ics, condensed matter and surface physics, 
nuclear and particle physics, and astrophysics. 



Space Physics and 
Astronomy 



M.S., Ph.D. (For B.A, see 
physics department, space 
physics option) 



Experimental and theoretical space physics, 
astrophysics, and atomic physics 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 73 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology B.A., Ph.D. 



Anthropology; biological, linguistic, social/ 
cultural anthropology 



Economics 



B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. 



Economics, mathematical economic analysis 



Political Science 



B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 



Psychology 



B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 



Sociology 



B.A. 



Statistics 



B.A., M.Stat. ,M.A., Ph.D. 



GEORGE R. BROWN SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



Chemical Engineering 



B.A., B.S., M.Ch.E., M.S. 
Ph.D. 



Biochemical, petroleum reservoir or biomedi- 
cal engineering; polymer science; materials, 
process control, thermodynamics, transport 
phenomena, heterogeneous catalysis, reactor 
engineering 



Civil Engineering 



B.A., B.S., M.C.E., M.S. 
Ph.D. 



Structural analysis and design, structural 
mechanics, geotechnical engineering, 
environmental engineering 



Computer Science 



B.A., M.S., M.C.S., Ph.D. 



Foundations of computer science, hardware 
systems, numerical computation, software sys- 
tems 



Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering 



B.A, B.S., M.E.E., M. 
Ph.D. 



Bioengineering, circuits, control and commu- 
nications systems, computer engineering, la- 
sers, and solid-state electronics 



Environmental Sci- 
ence and Engineering 



M.E.E., M.E.S.,M.S., 
Ph.D. (For B.A. as double 
major see department; B.S 
see Civil Engineering) 



Biological, physical, and chemical treatment 
processes; hydrology and water quality model 
ing; water resources management; aquatic 
biology; inorganic and organic chemistry; 
atmospheric physics 



Mathematical Sci- 
ences 



B.A.. M.A., Master in Ap- 
plied Mathematical Sci- 
ences, Ph.D. 



Computing, numerical analysis, operations 
research, physical mathematics, applied 
probability 



Mechanical Engineer- 
ing And Materials 
Science 



B.A., B.S., M.M.E., Computer applications, thermal sciences and 

M.M.S., M.S., Ph.D. energy conversion, gas dynamics, hydrody- 

namics and ocean engineering, stress analysis 
and mechanical behavior of materials, aero- 
space engineering, engineering science, elec- 
tronic materials 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

B.A., B.Arch., M.Arch., 
M.Arch in Urban Design, 
D.Arch. 



Architectural studies 



SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B.A., B.Mus., B.Mus./ 
M.Mus. simultaneously, 
M.Mus., D.M.A. 



Composition, conducting, music history, per- 
formance, theory 



JESSE H. JONES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ADMINISTRATION 



Master of Business 
Administration, Master of 
Accounting, Ph.D. in 
Accounting. (For B.A. see 
interdepartmental major 
in managerial studies. 
Both M.B.A. and M.Acco. 
degrees are available on a 
"5-year" accelerated plan 
for undergraduates.) 



Accounting, business entrepreneurship, fi- 
nance, management information systems, in- 
ternational management, marketing, opera- 
tions research, and public and nonprofit 
management 



74 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



School 
Department 



Degrees Offered 



Additional Options, Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 

Area Majors B.A. 



Managerial Studies 



Courses from two or more departments com- 
bined by the student and faculty advisor to 
form a coherent program 



Ancient 

Mediterranean 

Civilization 


B.A. 


Anthropology, art and art history, classics, 
history, philosophy, political science, reli- 
gious studies 


Behavioral Science 


B.A. 


Anthropology, psychology, sociology 


Chemical Physics 


B.A. 


Chemistry, physics 



B.A. Both M.B.A. and 
M.Acco. degrees are 
available on a "five-year" 
accelerated plan for 
undergraduates (see 
Accounting and 
Administrative Science). 



Accounting, computer science, economics, 
mathematical sciences, political science, psy- 
chology, statistics 



Policy Studies 



B.A. 



Anthropology, economics, history, 
philosophy, political science, psychology, 
sociology, statistics 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 75 

Managerial Studies 

The managerial studies major is a preprofessional program for students 
planning management careers in either business or government. The program is 
interdepartmental and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, either as a terminal 
degree or as preparation for graduate professional studies in accounting, law, 
business, or public management. Courses are drawn from the Departments of 
Economics, Computer Science, Mathematical Sciences, Statistics, Political Sci- 
ence, and Psychology and include accounting courses offered as a service by the 
Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration. 

The program is designed to provide students with a comprehensive under- 
standing both of the environment in which business firms operate and of the tools 
employed by management in making decisions. To major in managerial studies, 
students must complete 45 semester hours of approved coursework in the follow- 
ing subject areas: (1) accounting, (2) economics, (3) finance, (4) statistics, (5) 
quantitative methods, (6) computing, (7) business law, and (8) psychology. A list of 
approved courses is available from the program director. Professor Stephen A. 
Zeff, 352 Herring Hall, or from the managerial studies program advisers in each of 
the participating departments. 

An honors program is available in managerial studies. This program is de- 
signed (1) to provide students with the opportunity to enrich and to expand their 
knowledge of the managerial disciplines by means of specified advanced course 
work and/or independent research and writing and (2) to provide recognition for 
students who have demonstrated unusual competency in managerial studies. 
Students admitted to the honors program may elect certain graduate courses in 
accounting and administration as part of their major requirements. In addition, 
the undergraduate major may be partly satisfied by course work taken for the 
Master of Business Administration and Master of Accounting degrees. 

The managerial studies program is administered by a committee consisting of 
faculty from the Departments of Computer Science, Economics, Mathematical 
Sciences, Statistics, Political Science, Psychology, and the Jones Graduate School 
of Administration as well as student representatives. The program director chairs 
this committee. Student records for all managerial studies majors are maintained 
in the office of the program director. The managerial studies program director 
assigns students an adviser closely related to the area in which they intend to 
specialize. Students should consult with their adviser as early as possible to ensure 
establishment of an appropriate plan of study. 

While Rice does not offer an undergraduate degree in either accounting or 
business administration, there is a special "five-year" plan by which Rice under- 
graduates can apply to enter accelerated degree programs for the Master of 
Business Administration (which includes concentration programs in accounting 
and in public and nonprofit management) or Master of Accounting (see Account- 
ing and Administrative Science). Rice undergraduates may also complete the 
Master of Accounting program in one year of graduate study if they have taken a 
prescribed set of prerequisite courses by the end of their senior year (please see pp. 
75 and 147 for information). For details, contact the Jesse H. Jones Graduate 
School of Administration in Herring Hall. 



76 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Music 

The Shepherd School of Music offers four degrees: the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in music; the Bachelor of Music degree in performance, composition, music 
history, and music theory; the Master of Music degree in performance, composi- 
tion, choral and instrumental conducting, musicology and music theory; and the 
Doctor of Musical Arts degree in composition and selected areas of performance. 
Normally, four years are required for the bachelor's degrees and two years for the 
master's. Qualified students may elect an honors program that leads to the simulta- 
neous awarding of the Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees after five 
years of study. The final two years of the B.Mus./M.Mus. program are devoted to 
specialization and can be entered only upon passing qualifying examinations 
administered in the fifth or sixth semester. 

More detailed information about the Shepherd School and the requirements 
for degrees is given under Music in the Courses of Instruction section of this 
catalog. 



Natural Sciences 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences comprises the Departments of Bio- 
chemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Geophysics, Mathematics, Physics, 
and Space Physics and Astronomy. All but the Space Physics and Astronomy 
Department offer programs leading to the B.A. degree. Students may also elect 
double majors combining one of the programs in natural sciences with another 
science, the humanities, or an engineering field. The requirements for each major 
may be found in the departmental listings under Courses of Instruction, and are 
also available from the department chair and from the Registrar's Office. 



Policy Studies 

Policy studies is a liberal arts oriented interdisciplinary major focusing on 
policy issues that are of public interest. Evaluation and analysis of the determi- 
nants and effects of policy decisions are the central subject matter. It is a course of 
study concerned with theoretical issues as well as applied and prescriptive policy 
questions. 

The policy studies major represents an area of concentration which can be 
taken only as a second major, complementary to a major in any University 
department. The intent of the major is to provide students from a wide variety of 
academic backgrounds with an understanding of the policy-making process and an 
intellectual foundation in the skills of policy makers and evaluators. Students in 
the fields of engineering and basic sciences considering professions in business 
and/or government would benefit from an understanding of how technical innova- 
tions or regulations are adopted and implemented as matters of public policy. 
Students in humanistic fields such as languages or English would receive systemat- 
ic exposure to areas of study which have high intellectual appeal and in which their 
language skills might prove to be particularly valuable. Students should consult the 
Policy Studies section under Courses of Instruction for the list of requirements. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 77 

The administration of the program is in the hands of a committee consisting of 
representatives from the Departments of Anthropology (Professor Marcus) Eco- 
nomics (Professor Rimhnger), Philosophy (Professor Brody), Political Science 
(Professor Stein), Psychology (Professor Dipboye), Sociology (Professor David- 
son), Mathematical Sciences (Professor Scott), and History (Professor Wiener). 
The chair of the committee is Professor Stein. Students interested in policy studies 
should see Professor Stein, who will assign them an adviser closely related to their 
field of interest. 



Other Options for Undergraduate Majors 

In deciding on a major, students are encouraged to select a course of study 
directed toward their personal goals. Several options are available besides the 
normal major in most departments. Further information on these may be found in 
the departmental listings. 

1 . Areas of concentration within departmental majors. Certain majors, in- 
cluding architecture, electrical engineering, German, physics, and Span- 
ish, but not limited to these, have a choice of different areas of concentra- 
tion with different course requirements within the department major. 

2. Double or triple majors that fulfill the major requirements of two or three 
departments. The majors may, but need not, be in related fields: for 
example, computer science/math science or biology/English. 

3. Interdepartmental majors. Interdepartmental majors are offered in chem- 
istry with materials science or physics. Geophysics, behavioral science, 
managerial studies, and policy studies are examples of majors combining 
courses taught by faculty from several departments. 

4. Area majors. Instead of selecting an established departmental major or 
program, students have the option of developing an area major which is 
closer to their particular interests and career goals. Whereas double 
majors must conform to the requirements of both departments, an area 
major is a single major that combines courses from two or more depart- 
ments and forms a clearly coherent program with its own major require- 
ments. An area major is normally initiated by the student and is worked 
out in conjunction with the Office of Student Advising and faculty 
advisers from each of the departments involved. Together they must 
agree on a title, which will then designate the area major on the student's 
transcript, followed by the names of cooperating departments: for exam- 
ple, problems of the contemporary city (architecture, sociology, environ- 
mental science, and engineering). The requirements for each area major 
are approved by the faculty advisers and certified by the Office of Student 
Advising, who are jointly responsible for the validity and acceptability of 
the program as a degree plan. In addition, students who elect to take an 
area major must also complete all other University graduation 
requirements. 

Though students normally choose their majors at the end of the sophomore 
year, it is often possible to change majors or change from a departmental major to a 
related area major in the junior year. Students who might want to develop an area 
major but are uncertain which departments to approach and students who wish to 



78 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

change from a departmental major to an area major should consult with the Office 
of Student Advising. All applications for area majors must be certified by the 
Office of Student Advising before they are accepted by the Registrar. A student 
who chooses an area major may not double major in any other major. 



Premedical, Prelaw, and Prebusiness Programs 

In addition to the preprofessional and professional programs offered by Rice 
in accounting, architecture, business administration, engineering, public and 
nonprofit management, and music, a student may pursue a program which will 
satisfy the requirements for admission to graduate professional schools in busi- 
ness, dentistry, diplomacy and foreign affairs, health science, law, or medicine. 

The health professions adviser counsels students interested in premedical or 
predental studies and other areas of the health sciences. Those interested in 
prelegal studies should consult the prelaw adviser. Information about a career in 
business, finance, or accounting can be obtained from the prebusiness adviser. 
These advisers may be contacted through their offices in the Ley Student Center. 

Students who plan to enter medical school or other professional or graduate 
school at the end of their junior year at Rice can arrange to receive a Rice four-year 
bachelor's degree by submitting to the Committee on Examinations and Standing 
a degree plan which fulfills all normal University and departmental requirements 
for the bachelor's degree. The degree plan must be submitted before students begin 
their graduate or professional training. Transfer credit for courses not to exceed 
the equivalent of ten courses of three or four semester hours are accepted if the 
individual courses are acceptable to the student's major department and the 
registrar according to normal procedures. Students who have entered Rice after 
their first year must complete the minimum residence and course requirements for 
transfer students before leaving. The Committee on Examinations and Standing 
reviews the degree plan submitted by each student and gives final approval of the 
student's admission to the program. 

Premedical and Predental Programs. The entrance requirements for medical 
and dental colleges of the United States are limited to relatively few courses: one 
year each of general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, mathematics, biology, 
and English and laboratories required by the foregoing science courses. Because 
medical and dental schools show little or no preference for any one major, students 
planning a medical or dental career have the opportunity to choose their major on 
the basis of their interests and capabilities. They should keep two objectives in 
mind: ( 1 ) to secure a broadly based cultural background and (2) to master the 
necessary skills for an alternative career. Those who elect to concentrate in the 
sciences or engineering will automatically satisfy most of the entrance require- 
ments. Students concentrating in the humanities need to make some adjustments 
in their study plan in order to fulfill the entrance requirements. Premedical and 
predental students are advised to discuss their plans with the health professions 
adviser. 

Prelaw Studies. The academic requirement for admission to law school is 
satisfied by all degree programs offered at Rice. While many students major in 
history, political science, or economics, as a base for prelaw studies, no law school 
specifies particular courses or curricula as prerequisite to admission. Most require 
only a baccalaureate degree and the Law School Admission Test. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 79 

The Prelaw Handbook, published by the Association of American Law 
Schools and the Law School Admission Council, states that prelegal education 
should develop oral and written comprehension and expression as well as creative 
thinking and critical understanding of human values and that no one discipline is 
uniquely concerned with those objectives. Therefore, prelaw students should 
strive for development of their own capabilities within the areas of their greatest 
interest. Although there is no required course of study for the student interested in 
a legal career, the prelaw adviser recommends expository writing courses and 
beginning accounting and economics courses as useful to any law student. 

Interested students should contact the prelaw adviser early, preferably in their 
first year at Rice. The prelaw handbook, reference books, and catalog of many 
leading law schools are available in the prelaw office in the Ley Student Center. 
Prelaw students are encouraged to discuss their plans with the prelaw adviser. 

Prebusiness Studies. Graduate business schools consider a variety of attrib- 
utes when admitting students to their Master of Business Administration (MBA) 
programs: 

1 . Scholastic aptitude, as evidenced by undergraduate grades and the score 
on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), 

2. extracurricular activities, 

3. work experience, and 

4. ability to communicate effectively both in writing and orally. 

No one undergraduate major is favored over another. Students intending to 
study accounting or business administration at the graduate level are advised to 
select an undergraduate major (or majors) in which their academic performance is 
likely to be the strongest. 

Regardless of one's undergraduate major, it would be wise to take Economics 
211 and 212 and Accounting 305 as background courses. Since many major 
business schools prefer students who have relevant full-time experience, these 
courses will assist graduating seniors in obtaining employment in the private or 
public sector. 

Students who are considering application to a graduate business school are 
encouraged to consult the prebusiness adviser early in their undergraduate years. 
Graduate business schools differ in their objectives, curricula, teaching methods, 
job placement possibilities, and admission standards, and prospective applicants 
should endeavor to become versed in the programs of different schools before 
beginning the application process. The prebusiness adviser can also suggest the 
kinds of work experience which graduate business schools find to be the most 
useful for prospective students. 

Undergraduate students with exceptional academic records may apply for the 
"five-year" plan offered by the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration. 
Qualified students normally receive their bachelor's degree at the end of their 
senior year. They then receive either the Master of Business Administration or 
Master of Accounting degree at the end of their fifth year at Rice. 

Rice undergraduates may also complete the Master of Accounting program in 
one year of graduate study if they have taken the following prerequisite courses by 
the end of their senior year: Accounting 305, 411, and either 406 or 409; Econom- 
ics 211, 212, and 370; Mathematical Sciences 376 and either Statistics 280 or 
Psychology 339; and Political Science 309 and 310. Additional recommended, but 
not required, courses are Statistics 381 and 480; Economics 375 and 448; and 



80 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Psychology 1 1 and 23 1 . No specific undergraduate major is required for entrance 
into the program. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Programs 

Rice University hosts a Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. 
Students may participate in Army ROTC through a cross-enrollment program 
with the University of Houston. These programs seek to train college students so 
that upon graduation they may qualify as commissioned officers in a component of 
the United States Army, Navy or Marine Corps. The Navy has two categories of 
midshipmen, one working toward a Reserve commission and the other toward a 
regular commission. The Army normally awards Reserve commissions; however, 
certain selected distinguished military students may be offered commissions in the 
regular Army. 

Any student suspended by the University for academic failure or other cause 
is immediately discharged from the ROTC programs. Any student performing 
unsatisfactory work in military science or naval science courses or lacking satisfac- 
tory officer-like qualities may be discharged from the ROTC programs regardless 
of the quality of academic work. Enrollment in the ROTC programs at Rice 
University is normally made at the beginning of the fall term. Courses in naval 
science and military science are open to all students. These courses may be counted 
as free electives toward satisfying degree requirements, but they may not be used to 
satisfy any distribution requirements or departmental major requirements. The 
amount of credit assigned to each course is determined by the Provost, in consulta- 
tion with the Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum. All such courses shall, 
however, count toward the determination of probation, suspension, course load, 
and grade point average. 

Additional information regarding the ROTC programs and available scholar- 
ships is given under Military Science and Naval Science in the Courses of Instruc- 
tion section of this catalog. 

Teacher Certification 

Programs of study are offered to fulfill the Texas state requirements for 
teaching certificates on the secondary level in art, biology, chemistry, earth sci- 
ence, economics, English, French, German, health education, history, Latin, 
mathematics or mathematical sciences, physical education, physics, political sci- 
ence, psychology, Russian, general science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. 

Foreign Study Programs and Programs with Other 
Universities 

Institute of European Studies 

Rice is an affiliate university of the Institute of European Studies, a system of 
ten centers located in Durham, Freiburg, London, Madrid, Milan, Nantes, Paris, 
Vienna, Mexico City, Singapore, and Nagoya, Japan. Each center offers a variety 
of opportunities to complement Rice major programs or to develop new interests. 
In each case, the institute center is associated with a host university, and students 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 8 1 

may take a combination of courses offered by both the center and the university. 
Counselors and faculty from lES and the host university advise students in the 
selection of appropriate courses, facilitate registration at the university, arrange 
for university examinations, and provide transcripts to Rice. Students considering 
foreign study should arrange for prior approval of transfer credit through the 
academic department(s) involved and the Registrar. 



Beaver College Center for Education Abroad 

Rice is also affiliated with Beaver College Center for Education Abroad, 
which provides direct access to over 1 5 United Kingdom universities, among them 
various branches of the University of London, University of Bristol, and the 
University of Edinburgh. Beaver College also maintains a center in Vienna. These 
universities offer courses of study for Rice students with majors in science, 
engineering, the humanities, and the social sciences. Prior approval for transfer 
credit should be arranged through the academic department(s) and the Registrar. 



Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome 

Another consortial affiliation provided to enhance the Rice undergraduate 
experience is one centered in Rome, focusing on classical studies. Operated 
through Stanford University's Overseas Studies, this semester- or year-long pro- 
gram offers undergraduate courses in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history 
and archaeology, and ancient art., taught by European and American professors. 
Majors in Ancient Mediterranean Civilization are particularly encouraged to avail 
themselves of this program, although other juniors or seniors majoring in art 
history or classics would benefit, as well. Additional information on this and other 
foreign programs may be obtained in the Office of Student Advising. 



C. D. Broad Exchange Program with Trinity College, Cambridge 

This exchange program sponsored by the Student Aid Foundation Enterprises 
involves both students and faculty from Rice and Trinity College, Cambridge. 
Student participation, available through receipt of a competitive award, confers 
one year of study as a visiting student at Rice or at Trinity College in alternate 
years. Similar but shorter exchanges of Rice and Trinity faculty members will also 
be arranged through the program. The provost will appoint the Rice faculty 
member for the exchange program. 

Further information on the program may be obtained from the Office of 
Student Advising or from the Office of the Vice-President for Student Affairs. 



Rice-University of Lancaster Exchange Program 

Rice sophomores majoring or minoring in Economics and/or Managerial 
Studies and maintaining a minimum GPA of 2.5 may qualify for an exchange 
program with the University of Lancaster, a notable British university located in 
northwestern England, just south of the Lake District. Applications should be 



82 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

submitted to the Department of Economics early in the spring semester prior to the 
school year spent abroad; finalists will be selected from among the applicants by 
the faculty of the Department of Economics, in consultation with the Office of 
Student Advising. Although recipients should enroll in at least one Economics 
course while at the University of Lancaster, they may choose from a wide range of 
other courses, as well. 

The Rice-Lancaster exchange occurs on a one-for-one basis, and each student 
pays tuition, room, and board to his or her home institution. The program must be 
undertaken for a full academic year. 



Exchange Program with Federation of German-American Clubs 

Students at Rice with a firm grounding in the German language, both written 
and spoken, are eligible to compete for an exchange program co-sponsored by the 
Federation of German-American Clubs and Rice. Applications may be obtained 
from the Office of Student Advising and should be completed by mid-March. 
Selection of Rice finalists is made by the faculty of the Department of German and 
Slavic Studies, in cooperation with the Office of Student Advising. The number of 
Rice finalists is usually limited to one or two a year, based on an even exchange 
with German students. 

This ten-month program provides for the Rice student's enrollment at one of 
eighteen outstanding German universities, professional schools, or technical 
schools, depending on individual qualifications and field of study. The Federation 
of German- American Clubs makes the university assignment, based on a priority 
ranking by the applicant. The Clubs also host several weekend gatherings in 
different parts of Germany throughout the year abroad and assign a host family. 

Rice participants pay tuition, room, and board to Rice to be applied to their 
counterpart's credit; they are supplied with tuition payment and a stipend to cover 
room and board while in Germany. 



Rice-Swarthmore Exchange Program 

An exchange program exists between Rice and Swarthmore College for quali- 
fied students in the fall semester of their sophomore, junior or senior year. 
Swarthmore, which is situated on a wooded campus near Philadelphia, is a 
nondenominational coeducational college with academic standards similar to 
those at Rice. The exchange is for the fall semester only. Rice students apply in 
January by submitting their own letter of application and two supporting letters 
from faculty members. The exchange is on a one-for-one basis with each student 
continuing to pay all charges and fees to his or her home school. 

Prior approval of transfer credit should be requested for each course from the 
Registrar. Courses to be taken at Swarthmore which will apply to the student's 
major must also be approved by the department. Students who enroll in the normal 
program of four four-semester-hour courses at Swarthmore receive upon satisfac- 
tory completion 1 6 hours (or five courses) toward their Rice degree with a notation 
of specific courses which may count for fulfillment of major requirements or 
distribution within that block credit. Further information on this program may be 
obtained from the Office of the Vice-President for Student Affairs. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 83 

Academic Regulations 



All undergraduate students are subject to the academic regulations of the 
University. The Committee on Examinations and Standing administers the rules 
described below. Under unusual circumstances any student may submit a written 
petition to the committee requesting special consideration. All correspondence 
with the committee should be addressed in care of the Vice-President for Student 
Affairs. 

Registration 

Currently enrolled students preregister in April for the fall semester and in 
November for the spring semester and complete registration at the beginning of 
each semester. Entering students complete their registration during Orientation 
for New Students the week before classes begin in August. New students must 
complete, sign, and return a matriculation card in order to be properly registered. 

Unless a special tuition plan has been elected, all tuition and fees for the fall 
semester must be paid by the middle of August and for the spring semester by the 
end of December. 

A student who does not register or request a delay from the Registrar of the 
deadline established by the Academic Calendar is considered withdrawn from the 
University by default. To be readmitted, the student must be eligible to continue 
and must pay a $25 late registration fee. No student is allowed to register after the 
fourth week of classes except with approval from the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing for good reason shown. 

Students may change their registration by adding or dropping courses accord- 
ing to the proper procedure during the first two weeks of the semester without 
penalty fee. From the end of the second week to the end of the fourth week the 
student must obtain the instructors permission to add a course. The deadline for 
adding courses is the end of the fourth week of classes; the deadline for dropping 
courses is the end of the tenth week. Courses in which loss of credit has been 
assessed by the Honor Council may not be dropped. Students who add or drop 
courses after the second week but before the above deadlines will be charged $ 1 
for each drop/add form submitted. If the change is necessary because of a revision 
or cancellation of the course by the department, no penalty fee will be charged. 



Course Programs 

Students at Rice normally enroll in 1 5 to 1 7 semester hours each semester and 
thus in eight semesters complete the requirements for graduation in their major. 
Students who wish to register for more than 20 semester hours, or to enroll or 
continue in fewer than 1 2 hours, or to register simultaneously for credit at another 
university, must secure permission from the Vice-President for Student Affairs 
before filing their registrations. No student may receive credit for more than 20 
semester hours in a semester, including courses taken elsewhere, unless he or she 
has received this prior written approval. 



84 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

A student on academic probation is not allowed to enroll in more than 17 
semester hours. A student who receives two or more ''incomplete" grades in a 
semester is not eligible to enroll in more than 14 semester hours in the semester 
immediately following. 

Students are prohibited from registering for more than one course at the same 
hour, unless they receive permission from the instructors involved. 



Transfer Credit Including Credit for 
Summer School Courses Not Taken at Rice 

The basis for approval of transfer credit toward a Rice undergraduate degree 
for courses taken at another college or university is that they should be appropriate 
to the Rice curriculum. Thus credit is given to courses whose content is such that 
they are or could be appropriately offered at Rice. Transfer credit is granted for a 
total of no more than 1 4 semester hours taken during the summer at an accredited 
college or university other than Rice. 

Students who wish to take courses at another university during an approved 
leave of absence or during the summer are advised to secure prior approval of 
transfer credit from the registrar by submitting the name of the school and the list 
of specific courses for which credit is requested. If courses taken elsewhere are to 
count as part of the student's major requirements, written approval for transfer 
credit must also be secured from the appropriate department. 

Prior approval is recommended but not required. Courses may be submitted 
for transfer credit after the work has been completed. If approval of credit is 
granted, it is entered on the student's permanent record only when the Registrar 
receives an official transcript verifying completion of the work with a grade 
equivalent to ''C-" or better. 

Students transferring to Rice from another college or university should apply 
to the Registrar for transfer credit on the same basis. 



Final Examinations 

Final examinations are given in most courses, but the decision to give a final 
examination as a required part of the course rests with the instructor and the 
department. 

Final examinations that cover more than the material since the last examina- 
tion, that are the only exam in the course, or that are comprehensive of the entire 
course may be given only during the final examination period. Such examinations 
may not, for example, be labeled "tests" and administered during the last week of 
classes. 

Final examinations are normally of three hours duration. Faculty who, under 
exceptional circumstances, wish to give longer examinations can do so only if the 
exam is scheduled as take-home. Under no circumstances may final exams exceed 
five hours. The "due date" for all take-home final exams is the end of the 
examination period. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing also recommends that hour 
exams not be given in the final week of classes in those courses in which a final is 
given. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 85 

All tests and examinations are conducted under the honor system. 

University-sponsored events, including varsity athletic games, matches, and 
meets, and other functions which require student participation, shall not be 
scheduled so as to occur during the period beginning with the second day following 
the end of regular classes and continuing through the end of final examinations. In 
order to facilitate student attendance in classes during the final week of the 
semester, varsity athletic games, matches, and meets scheduled between Monday 
of the final week of classes and the day following the last day of classes should not 
involve travel outside of Houston. Requests for exceptions may be made to the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing which will forward its recommenda- 
tions to the President. 



The Pass-Fail Option 

An undergraduate student may register for courses on a pass/fail basis subject 
to the following limitations: 

1 . The total number of pass/fail courses taken as an undergraduate shall not 
exceed one for each full year of residence up to a limit of four. Students 
participating in off-campus programs administered through Rice will be 
considered in residence at Rice for the purpose of this rule. 

2. The total number of pass/fail semester hours shall not exceed 14. 

3. A student may register for only one pass/fail course in a semester. 

4. No courses specifically required for the major, nor courses within the 
major department (or major area for area or interdepartmental majors) 
may be taken pass/fail. 

Courses can be taken under the pass-fail option if the student files the proper 
form in the Registrar's Office no later than the end of the fourth week of classes. 
The student may convert any course so designated to a graded course prior to the 
end of the tenth week by filing the proper form with the Registrar. Students should 
consider declaring pass/fail declarations early in the semester and changing to a 
grade designation later if appropriate. The Committee on Examinations and 
Standing rarely approves conversion to a pass/fail designation after the deadline. 
Students should be aware that while a P does not affect the GPA, an F for a course 
taken pass-fail does count in the GPA. The pass/fail option may be declared for a 
course taken during the Rice summer session, but this counts toward the total of 
four courses ( 1 4 hours). 



86 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Grade Symbols and Designations 

Courses are graded using the following symbols: 

A 

B 

C 

D 

F 

P pass — students successfully taking a course pass/fail receive 

a P. 

S Students successfully completing a designated satisfactory/ 

fail course receive an S. The grade of S indicates satisfactory 
completion of a course in which traditional grading 
procedures are not used. Unsatisfactory completion of such 
a course is indicated by the grade of F. Course or labs in 
which traditional grading procedures are not used must be 
designated in the "Schedule of Courses Offered" published 
each semester by the Registrar. Courses so designated may 
be counted toward the completion of a major. Students 
should be aware that while an S does not affect the GPA, an 
F received in such a course does. 

Designations for special purposes: 

W withdrew 

INC incomplete 

## other 

NO no grade reported by instructor 

NC no credit granted for this course 

These designations, explained below, do not affect grade averages. 

Instructors are required to report a grade for all students (except auditors) 
whose names appear on the class list. For students who also receive a designation of 
"incomplete" or "other," the grade is determined on the basis of zero credit for the 
work not completed and does not become part of the student's record except as 
discussed below. For the students who withdraw from the University within the 
last five weeks of classes, the grade, which will not appear on the student's record, 
but will be used solely in determining eligibility for readmission, should be based 
on the performance of the student up to the time of withdrawal. 

A designation of "incomplete" is reported to the Registrar by the instructor 
when a student has not been able to complete a course because of verified illness or 
other circumstances beyond the student's control during the semester. Such work 
must be completed and a revised grade submitted by the end of the fifth week of the 
next semester; otherwise, the Registrar's Office will record the grade originally 
submitted by the instructor. 

A designation of "other" is reported to the Registrar if a student fails to appear 
for the final examination after completing all the other work of a course. A 
designation of "other" must be resolved and a revised grade submitted by the end 
of the first week of classes of the second semester or by the end of the fourth week 
after commencement, whichever is applicable. If no revised grade is received, the 
Registrar's Office will record the grade originally submitted by the instructor. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 87 

A designation of "wiihdrew" appears for each course for which the student 
was enrolled at the time of withdrawal from the University. Courses dropped by 
students prior to the late drop deadline are removed entirely from the transcript. A 
"W" is recorded for any course dropped with the approval of the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing after the late drop deadline. See also the section 
"Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission" for rules concerning withdrawal in the 
last five weeks of classes. 

A designation of "no grade" indicates that the instructor failed to report a 
grade. Instructors are asked to resolve this situation as quickly as possible. 

Students with designations of "incomplete" and "other" should be aware that 
they may go on probation or suspension when these are changed to grades. 

Students may repeat courses previously failed. The record of the first attempt 
(and grade) remains on the permanent record (transcript). Both grades are includ- 
ed in GPA calculations. If students repeat courses previously passed, credit is 
awarded only once unless the course is designated as repeatable for credit. Each 
attempt remains on the permanent record and each grade is included in the GPA. 



Grade Points and Grade Averages 



Grade 


Grade Points 


A 


4.0 


B 


3.0 


C 


2.0 


D 


1.0 


F 


0.0 



Plus and minus signs may be attached to each grade except F. One-third of a 
grade point is added or subtracted, respectively. It is general University grading 
practice to give pluses and minuses. 

Grade point averages (GPA's) are calculated as follows. For each course, the 
product of the course credit attempted and the grade points for the grade earned is 
calculated. These products are added for each course and the result is divided by 
the total credit attempted. The result is the GPA. 

GPA's are reported each semester on the student's grade report, and may 
appear on unofficial transcripts. However, GPA's are not included on official 
transcripts; nor are they reported to any external agency. Class ranks are likewise 
not reported externally. 



Faculty Grading Guidelines 

The following guidelines on grading have been drawn up by the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing for the information of faculty and students, the 
committee believes that the following policies have long been supported in prac- 
tice by the faculty both individually and collectively: 

1 . The evaluation of the student's performance in a course and a decision on 
the appropriate grade is the responsibility of the designated instructor or 
instructors in the course. 

2. No student should be given an extension of time or opportunities to 
improve a grade that are not available to all members of the class, except 



88 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

for verified illness or justified absence from campus. Students who have 
three scheduled final examinations in two consecutive calendar days 
may, however, take one of the examinations at another time. 

3. Students in independent study courses are not to be allowed an extension 
beyond the time when grades are due. Faculty are to submit grades at the 
end of the semester for such students based on work completed during the 
semester. The instructor directing the independent study bears responsi- 
bility with the student both for ensuring that the work undertaken is 
appropriate to the span of a semester and for determining the degree 
credit to be received. 

4. The basis for grading and the expectations on all written assignments or 
tests should be clearly explained to the class in advance, preferably in 
writing at the beginning of the semester. The instructor should explain 
clearly which assignments or homework are covered by the Honor Code 
and which are not. To prevent allegations of plagiarism on written 
assignments, students should be warned that all direct and indirect 
quotations from others sources should be properly acknowledged. The 
instructor should explain the extent to which the student's paper is 
expected to be independent of the references and clearly distinguishable 
from them. 

5. Instructors should be willing to give any student an explanation of his or 
her grade as consistent with the grading for the rest of the class. For this 
reason the Committee urges the faculty to preserve all examinations and 
written material not returned to students as well as grade records for the 
semester for at least one month into the following semester so that 
students may, if they wish, review with their instructor the basis for the 
grade which they have received. 

6. Instructors may not change a semester grade after the grade sheet has 
been submitted to the Registrar except for a clerical error in calculating 
the grade. This is a long-standing University rule of which the faculty are 
reminded by the Registrar at the end of each semester. It is designed in 
part to protect the faculty from student pressure for grade changes. All 
other grade changes, including retroactive change to withdrawal or in- 
complete,must be approved by the Committee on Examination and 
Standing on the basis of a written petition from the student and informa- 
tion from the instructor. 

7. There is no University requirement that a final examination be given in a 
course. It is University policy that: 

a. Final examinations that cover more than the material since the 
last examination, that are the only exam in the course, or that are 
comprehensive of the entire course may be given only during the 
final examination period. Such examinations may not, for ex- 
ample, be labeled "tests" and administered during the last week 
of classes. 

b. Final examinations are normally of three hours duration. 
Faculty who, under exceptional circumstances, wish to give 
longer examinations can do so only if the exam is scheduled as 
take-home. Under no circumstances may final exams exceed 
five hours. The "due date" for all take-home final exams is the 
end of the examination period. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 89 

8. Freshmen students receive mid-semester grades around the eighth week 
of the fall and spring semesters so that they can, if advisable, enroll in 
tutoring or drop a class for which they may not be prepared. Faculty who 
teach freshmen in any of their classes will be asked to submit grades of 
standing for these students during the seventh week of the semester and 
should schedule the grading of tests, quizzes, or homework assignments 
accordingly. These grades are not recorded on the student's transcript nor 
calculated in the GPA, but they are important indicators for students and 
their faculty advisers. 

9. Departments using teaching associates, adjunct professors, or visiting 
faculty of any kind should make sure these teachers are familiar with Rice 
grading procedures. A regular faculty member who is well versed in the 
grading guidelines should be assigned to assist such instructors. 

The Chair of the Committee on Examinations and Standing or the Vice 
President for Student Affairs will be glad to advise any faculty member faced with 
exceptional circumstances which may justify special consideration. Students may 
petition the Committee concerning the application of these guidelines. Suspected 
or possible violations of the Honor Code should be submitted to the Honor 
Council. 



President's Honor Roll 

Outstanding students are recognized each semester through the publication of 
the President's Honor Roll. In order to be eligible, students must have grades 
exclusive of pass-fail and satisfactory-fail in a total of 12 or more semester hours 
and must not have any grade of ''F." Approximately 30 percent of all undergradu- 
ates are so recognized. Undergraduates enrolled in four-year bachelor's degree 
programs are always eligible for the Honor Roll. Students enrolled in five-year 
bachelor's/master's programs are eligible only during their first eight semesters. 



Academic Probation 

A student is placed on academic probation if at the end of any semester: 

1 . the student's grade point average for that semester is less than 1 .67 or, 

2. the student has a cumulative grade point average less than 1.67. This 
requirement is waived if the GPA for that semester is at least 2.0. 

The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which the 
student is enrolled at the University. A student on probation (academic or discipli- 
nary) is not permitted to be a candidate or hold any elective or appointive office. 
This restriction is also embodied in the constitution of the Student Association. 



Academic Suspension 

A student is suspended from the University if at the end of any semester: 

1 . the student earns grades that would place him/her on academic probation 
a third time, or; 

2. the student earns a grade point average less than 1 .00 for the semester, 
except for students completing their first semester at Rice. 



90 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Students readmitted after a previous suspension will again be suspended if in 
any succeeding semester they fail to achieve at least one of the following 
requirements: 

1 . a cumulative and semester grade point average of at least 1 .67, or; 

2. a semester average of at least 2.00. 

The period of a first suspension is normally one semester; the period of a 
second suspension is at least two semesters. Normally, students will not be 
readmitted following a third suspension. 

Suspension is deemed to occur as soon as a responsible University official, 
normally the Registrar, learns that a student's performance has been such as to 
place him or her on suspension. Suspension is lifted the first day of class of the 
semester in which the student returns to the University, or in the case of persons 
who have served the nominal term of suspension but do not intend to return to 
Rice when they have received permission from the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing to have that suspension lifted. 

A student who earns grades in a semester that would place him or her on 
academic suspension but who otherwise satisfies the requirements for graduation 
in that semester will be allowed to graduate. 

Disciplinary Probation and Suspension 

A student may be placed on probation or suspension for an honor code 
violation or for disciplinary reasons through action of the Proctor. No student may 
receive a degree while on disciplinary suspension (including that for an honor code 
violation), even if all academic requirements for graduation have been fulfilled. 

Readmission After Suspension 

To obtain readmission after academic or disciplinary suspension, the student 
must address a letter of petition to the Committee on Examinations and Standing; 
this letter should be received at least a month before the beginning of classes. At the 
same time, the student should request two supporting letters from persons under 
whom the student has worked during the suspension period as a student or an 
employee. If the problems causing the previous difficulty appear to have been 
relieved, the student is generally readmitted. In some instances, approval of 
readmission may be postponed, or suspension may be permanent. Petitions for 
readmission following a separation from the University involving disciplinary or 
other non-academic consideration will be subject to review by the Proctor before 
consideration by the Committee on Examinations and Standing. A student desir- 
ing special consideration with regard to readmission following suspension should 
petition the committee in writing. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing does not normally place 
students on probation and suspension as the result of deficient performance in the 
Rice Summer School (although it may do so at its discretion). Students are warned, 
however, that grade averages are affected. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 91 

Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student may withdraw voluntarily from the University at any time during 
the semester up until the last day of classes and, if in good academic standing at the 
time of withdrawal, the student is normally readmitted upon written application to 
the Committee on Examinations and Standing. 

Any student desiring to withdraw should inform the college master m person 
and give written notification of withdrawal to the Vice-President for Student 
Affairs, who will notify other offices of the University as necessary. If the student 
withdraws within five weeks of the last day of classes, grades of standing as of the 
day of withdrawal are considered in determining eligibility for readmission. 
Students with grades of standing that would have placed them on suspension had 
they not withdrawn will, for purposes of readmission, be treated as if they had been 
suspended Such students should follow the guidelines for readmission shown 
under the suspension rules. Students who fail to give notice of withdrawal should 
expect to receive failing grades. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may request a leave of absence from the University by applying in 
writing to the Committee on Examinations and Standing at any time prior to the 
first day of classes in the semester which marks the beginning of the leave. Leave 
from the University after the first day of classes is considered a voluntary 

withdrawal. ^ , . . 

To be readmitted following an approved leave of absence of not more than 
four semesters, students need only notify the Vice-President for Student Affairs of 
their intention to terminate their leave at least one month before the beginning ot 
the semester. After four semesters, they should apply in writing to the Committee 
on Examinations and Standing, as in the case of a voluntary withdrawal. 

Approval of a leave of absence is always contingent on the student's satisfacto- 
ry completion of course work in the semester preceding the leave; otherwise, the 
approved leave may be converted to suspension. 

Extended Time Graduation 

Students enrolled in four (five-) year bachelor's programs may elect to be 
subject to the academic regulations in effect either at the time of their intial 
registration at Rice or at the time of their graduation, unless they graduate more 
than seven (eight) years after that initial registration. In that case they will be 
subject to the regulations in effect at the time of their last readmission. 

Courses in a student's major program completed more than seven (eight) years 
prior to graduation are subject to review by the appropriate departments. It the 
departments conclude that any such courses are no longer suitable for satisfymg 
the requirements of the major, those courses will not be credited toward the major 
program, although they will remain on the student's record. 



92 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Rice Tutorial Program 



Departments with major teaching assignments in introductory courses pro- 
vide tutoring to students having academic difficulty. Each participating depart- 
ment names a department coordinator who is responsible for organizing tutoring 
activities and assigning students who need tutoring to groups or individual tutors. 
Assignments are made on a mutually agreeable basis after consultation. 

Each residential college selects a faculty associate who has agreed to serve as 
college coordinator. This faculty member seeks ways to aid communication and 
help advise students who may need tutoring. The entire tutoring program is under 
the supervision of the Director of Student Advising. Tutoring is available for 
freshmen enrolled in any course or for upperclassmen registered in an introductory 
course. The normal procedure is for the student to consult with the course 
instructor or the department coordinator; however, the college coordinator and 
the program coordinator are available for consultation and assistance. 

Information concerning the tutorial program may be secured from the Office 
of Student Advising. 



Admission of New Students 



From its beginning. Rice University has sought to maintain an academic 
program of the highest excellence for a small body of students. This number has 
grown with the expansion of the University's resources over the past decade, but 
the total number of students admitted to Rice still remains relatively 
small — approximately 600 students in each first-year class. 

In making its selections, the Admission Committee attempts to seek out and 
identify students who have demonstrated exceptional ability and the potential for 
personal and intellectual growth. There is no discrimination whatever on the basis 
of sex, race, ethnic background, age, or physical handicap. Decisions are based not 
only on high school grades and test scores but also on such qualities as leadership, 
participation in extracurricular activities, and personal creativity. The Universi- 
ty's aim is diversity rather than uniformity, and it believes that students learn from 
each other and from life in the residential colleges, as well as from their classes and 
laboratories. 

Students are selected on a competitive basis in five academic areas. They are: 
( 1 ) architecture, (2) humanities and social sciences, (3) engineering, (4) music, and 
(5) natural sciences. Applicants should give careful consideration to the category 
under which they wish to be considered. Students, however, are free to change 
from one of these areas to another, after consultation with their adviser. Only 
architecture and music have strictly limited enrollments. Occasionally, physical 
limitations of other departments may make it necessary to limit enrollment of 
majors. 

There are five basic measures generally used in evaluation of candidates for 
admission: ( 1 ) scholastic record as reflected by the courses chosen and the quality 
of performance, (2) scores on the Scholastic Aptitude and Achievement Tests 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 93 

administered by the College Board, (3) recommendations from teachers and 
counselors, (4) the personal interview, and (5) the application itself. The Admis- 
sion Committee is particularly interested in any information that can give insight 
into the extracurricular areas of development and such intangible factors as 
motivation, intellectual curiosity, character, and special talents. 

1. The High School Record. The completion of not less than 16 acceptable 
units is required. The record must include the following units: 

English 4 Laboratory science 2 

Social Studies 2 (biology, chemistry, physics, etc.) 

Mathematics 3 Additional credits in above- 3 

A foreign language 2 listed subjects 

Total 16 

Students admitted with academic deficiencies will be asked to complete the 
required work by taking high school or college level courses during the summer 
before enrollment at Rice. 

Courses in chemistry, physics, trigonometry, or other advanced mathematics 
courses are required of applicants for the engineering and science divisions. 

2. Entrance Examinations. The required entrance examinations are adminis- 
tered by the College Board. The College Board bulletins and test applications are 
available from high school counseling offices or the Rice Admission Office. The 
applicant is responsible for making arrangements to take the examinations, and 
official score reports must be submitted before the student can be considered for 
admission (see the calendar on page 96). 

The following tests are required according to the curriculum desired: 
A. Humanities, Social Sciences, B. Science and Engineering 

Architecture, and Music 

(1) Scholastic Aptitude Test (1) Scholastic Aptitude Test 

(2) Three Achievement Tests as (2) Three Achievement Tests as 
follows follows 

(a) English composition* (a) English composition* 

(b) any two of the (b) Mathematics 
following: (Level I or Level II) 
A foreign language (c) Chemistry or physics 
American history 

European history and 

world cultures *with or without essay 

Literature 
Mathematics 
A science 

3. Candidates must submit evaluations from a counselor and one teacher. The 

necessary forms are included in the application. . • • 

4. The Personal Interview. The interview is an integral part of the admission 
procedure. It enables the Committee on Admission to reach a decision based on 
nonacademic, as well as academic, aspects of the candidate's development. Stu- 
dents should arrange for an interview in compliance with the admissions calendar 
on page 96. Campus interviews are held at 109 Lovett Hall between the hours of 
900 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and until 11:30 on Saturday 



94 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

mornings. (Summer schedule: Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) 
Houston area students who fail to interview will not be considered for admission. 
Applicants who cannot visit the University or who are unable to meet with a 
traveling member of the admissions staff may be interviewed by alumni interview- 
ers located throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. If an 
applicant cannot be interviewed by one of these methods, the interview may be 
waived. Candidates for admission to the Shepherd School of Music must arrange 
for an audition and theory test with the music faculty. Architecture applicants 
should interview with a faculty member in the School of Architecture and submit a 
portfolio. 

5. The Application. The application provides the committee with important 
information on the student's background and gives the applicant an opportunity to 
provide statements on his or her interests, experiences, and goals. Please note that 
no application fee is required of candidates for admission to Rice. 



Early Decision Plan 

The Early Decision Plan is open to candidates for admission who regard Rice 
University as their first choice and will await the outcome of their application to 
Rice before applying elsewhere. Students applying for the fall semester 1 989 under 
the Early Decision Plan must complete the required College Board examinations 
on or before the June testing date in the junior year. All other materials should be 
filed by October 1 5. Admission notices will be mailed on December 1. 

Requirements for admission are not altered by an early decision. Those 
accepted are expected to complete the remainder of their high school work with 
superior performance. Early Decision candidates should apply for financial aid 
using the Early Version of the Financial Aid Form (FAF). Those applying by 
November 1 will be notified by December 1 . Late filers will be notified as soon as 
their information is processed. 

Action on some applications will be deferred until the Regular Decision 
period if the Admissions Committee does not have adequate grounds for an 
affirmative decision in December. An additional semester of the high school 
record and additional College Board scores from the November, December, or 
January tests may be added for later consideration. The applicant would, of course, 
be released from the pledge to apply only to Rice. An applicant offered admission 
under the Early Decision Plan must make a $100 registration deposit within 30 
days in order to hold his or her place in the incoming class. This deposit is 
nonrefundable after May 1 . Those who wish to reserve a room on campus must 
make an additional $50 deposit. 



Interim Decision Plan 

Applicants who complete their SAT and Achievement Tests on or by the 
December testing date and who file all other materials by December 1 may be 
considered in the Interim Decision Plan and notified of the outcome by early 
February. Action on some applications may be deferred until the Regular Decision 
period if the Admission Committee does not have adequate grounds for an 
affirmative decision in February. 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 95 

Applicants offered admission under this plan must make a $ 100 nonrefund- 
able registration deposit within 30 days of the notification date. Those who wish to 
reserve a room on campus must make an additional $50 deposit. 



Regular Decision Plan 

Regular Decision applications completed by January 1 5 are considered by 
April 1 . Applications received after January 1 5 are considered only after all earlier 
applications. Candidates who apply after January 1 5 must do so in full knowledge 
that they are in a highly speculative position. 

Regular Decision applicants who are offered admission should make a $ 100 
registration deposit by May 1 to reserve their places in the incoming class. This 
deposit is not refundable. Those who wish to reserve a room on campus must make 
an additional $50 deposit. 

Financial aid applicants for Interim and Regular Decision should consult the 
calendar on page 96 for deadlines and notification dates. Late filers will be notified 
as soon as their information is processed. 



96 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
Admissions Calendar 



EARLY 
DECISION 

Application by 
October 1 5 



INTERIM 
DECISION 

Application by 
December 1 



REGULAR 
DECISION 

Application by 
January 15 



TRANSFER 

Application by 
April 1 for fall, 
Nov. 1 for spring 



Required SAT 
and 

Achievement 
Tests on or 
by June test 
date in the 
junior year 



Required SAT 

and 

Achievement 

Tests 

completed on 

or by Dec. test 

date 



Required SAT 

and 

Achievement 

Tests 

completed on 

or by Jan. test 

date 



Required SAT if 
never previously 
taken 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
December 1 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
February 1 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
April 1 



Notification in 
late May or 
December 



Financial Aid 
Form (Early 
Version) filed 
by November 1 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
December 1 



Financial Aid 
Form filed 
by Jan. 15 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
February 1 



Financial Aid 
Form filed 
by March 1 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
April 1 



Notification 
when admitted; 
allow 1 month 
after filing 
Financial Aid 
Form 



Deposit within 
30 days 
nonrefundable 
after May 1 



Deposit within 
30 days 
nonrefundable 



Deposit by 
May 1 

(candidates' 
Reply Date) 
nonrefundable 



Nonrefundable 
$100 deposit 
within 15 days 
of admission 



NOTE: For students desiring on campus accommodations, a $ 50.00 room deposit 
should accompany your registration deposit. The room deposit may be refunded 
or credited to the applicant's account until May 1 . No application fee is required of 
candidates for admission to Rice. 



Advanced Placement 

Entering first-year students who have done work well beyond the usual high 
school courses in certain subjects and who score "4" or "5" on the Advanced 
Placement College Board examinations prior to matriculation at Rice are given 
University credit toward graduation for appropriate Rice courses satisfying distri- 
bution or free elective requirements. Acceptance of such credit in fulfillment of a 
student's major requirements is subject to approval by the department in question. 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 97 

Rice also gives credit for a strong performance on the College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP) test in chemistry and biology administered during orienta- 
tion week. 

Furthermore, during orientation week at the beginning of the academic year, 
entering students may take advanced placement tests administered by various 
departments at Rice. On the basis of these tests, students may be advised to register 
in courses beyond the introductory level. Degree credit is not given for these tests. 



Transfer Students 

Rice University encourages application from students with superior records 
who wish to transfer from a two-year college or a four-year college or university. 
Interested students should request a transfer application form from the Office of 
Admission. 

Applications for admission in the fall semester should be filed by April 1 and 
be accompanied by official transcripts of all high school and college work complet- 
ed to date and courses in progress. Notification of admission is mailed in late May. 
Applications for admission for the spring semester with the appropriate tran- 
scripts must be filed by November 1. Notification of admission is mailed by mid- 
December. The criteria used in evaluating transfer applications are essentially the 
same as those applied to applicants for the first-year class, except that special 
emphasis is given to performance at the college level. Because of the highly 
competitive nature of transfer admission, it is recommended that applicants have 
a minimum 3.2 (4.0 scale) G.P.A. on all college work. Scholastic Aptitude Test 
scores are required. If candidates have not previously taken College Board tests, 
they must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test no later than April if they wish to apply 
for admission in the fall. Achievement Tests are not required. 

Transfer students must be registered in residence at Rice for at least four full 
semesters during the fall or spring terms and must complete not less than 60 
semester hours for a Rice degree. 

Note that first-year candidates may apply for entry in the fall semester only, 
because Rice does not accept freshmen at midyear. Transfer candidates may be 
admitted for either the spring or fall semesters, except for students applying to the 
School of Architecture, who may enter in the fall only. 

For further information or application forms, prospective candidates for 
admission as undergraduates should communicate with the Office of Admission. 
When requesting application forms, candidates should clearly indicate that they 
are prospective transfers from another college. 



Visiting Students 

Students who wish to spend a semester or a year at Rice taking courses for 
credit to be applied toward their undergraduate degree at another school should 
apply for admission as visiting students through the Office of Admission. The 
student's application should be accompanied by an official transcript of college 
work to date and a letter from the student's academic dean or registrar agreeing to 
grant transfer credit subject to satisfactory performance. 



98 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Visiting students are assigned membership in a college during their stay and 
are charged the same fees as other undergraduates. In a few classes where enroll- 
ment is limited because of space or other considerations, candidates for Rice 
degrees have priority over visiting students. 



Class III Students 

Class III standing at Rice University designates students with an undergradu- 
ate or graduate degree from an accredited college or university who are taking 
courses for credit but not in a specific degree program. 



Admission of High School Students to Take Courses for Credit 

Accelerated high school juniors and seniors who have taken all the courses in a 
given discipline available to them in high school or who have completed their high 
school graduation requirements may request admission to Rice for the purpose of 
taking one or more University level courses on the same basis as Rice undergradu- 
ates. Such courses are graded for credit, and the University sends a transcript of 
this record on request by the student to any college or university. If the high school 
student is later admitted to Rice, any such courses are counted toward the student's 
undergraduate degree at Rice. Tuition for such courses is $225 per semester hour 
plus a $50 registration fee, the total not to exceed $2,650. These charges are for 
1 988-89 and are subject to change in subsequent years. Application for admission 
should be made to the Admission Office. Financial assistance is not available for 
this program. 



Auditors 

Any interested person, including currently enrolled students, may audit one 
or more courses at Rice by securing permission of the instructor and by registering 
as an auditor with the Registrar. The University grants no academic credit for such 
work. Audit credit does not appear on transcripts. Currently enrolled students may 
audit courses without charge. Rice alumni may audit as many courses as they wish 
for a fee of $25 per semester. All others are charged $50 per course per semester for 
the privilege of auditing. 



Student Housing 

Information about residence in the colleges and room application forms 
accompany the notice of admission sent to each new undergraduate. Room 
reservations cannot be made prior to notification of admission. 

At present. Rice University has the capacity to house about 70 percent of its 
undergraduate students in the residential colleges on campus. Although the major- 
ity of students desiring to live in the colleges can be accommodated, demand 
usually exceeds the available number of rooms. Every effort is made to provide 
housing in the colleges for all incoming first-year students who wish to live on 
campus, but continuing students cannot be promised space and must draw for 



TUITION, FEES, AND EXPENSES 99 

rooms according to the priority system in each college. No student is required to 
live on campus. Off-campus members are encouraged to eat in their colleges and to 
participate in college activities. 

Correspondence from new students regarding housing in the residential col- 
lege should be addressed to the Office of Admission. Information concerning off- 
campus housing is available from the Office of Student Advising and Student 
Activities. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



The tuition for undergraduate students in 1 988-89 is $5,300 per year, $2,650 
payable prior to the beginning of each semester. 

Part-time students taking fewer than 1 2 hours by special permission are billed 
at the part-time rate of $225 per semester hour for the courses in which they are 
enrolled plus a $50 registration fee, the total tuition and registration fee not to 
exceed $2,650 per semester. 

Any undergraduate who withdraws or takes an approved leave of absence and 
is then readmitted to the university is charged the tuition in effect during the 
semester in which he or she returns. 



Fees 

All undergraduate students and candidates for a second bachelor's degree are 
charged the following annual fees, payable in full at the time of the student's first 
tuition payment for the year or any portion of the year. An exception is the Health 
Service fee, which is paid in two installments, half before the beginning of the fall 
semester and half before the beginning of the spring semester. 

Subsidies to student activities $42.60 

Tickets to athletic events 35.00 

College fee 40.00 

Health Service fee 123.20 

Total basic fees $240.80 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance for the 
1 988-89 school year may be purchased at a yearly premium of $378.00 (Plan A) or 
$266.00 (Plan B) from the University's program developed for Rice students. 
Coverage will be effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1988, until 12:01 a.m., 
August 15, 1989. Dependent coverage is also available (application and policy 
description can be obtained from the Cashier's Office or the Office of Student 
Activities and Advising). If you have other medical insurance, a waiver card 
showing proof of insurance must be signed and returned to the Cashier's Office by 
August 1 5 to avoid being charged for insurance. 



1 00 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Special Charges 

Orientation week room and board (required for all new students) $70.00 

ROTC $25.00 

Late payment/late registration fees $25.00 

Late course change $10.00 

Late application fee for Class III $50.00 



Refund of Tuition and Fees and Appeal Procedure 

A student who withdraws during the first two weeks of the semester is not 
charged tuition or fees for that semester. A student who withdraws during the third 
week is charged 30 percent of the semester's tuition. The amount of the refund is 
reduced by 1 percent at the beginning of each successive week. No refund is made 
for withdrawals after the ninth week. There is no refund of fees or special charges 
after the second week of classes in the semester. The $ 1 00 registration deposit paid 
by incoming students is not refunded at any time if the student withdraws. There is 
no partial refund of fees paid for the full year for withdrawals or leaves of absence 
in the spring semester. 

Student requests for special consideration in connection with waivers, re- 
funds, or adjusted payments on tuition, fees, and other charges, which cannot be 
satisfactorily resolved between, the student and the Cashier's Office, should be 
forwarded to the Vice-President for Student Affairs. Resolution of waivers and 
refunds for room and board charges should be arranged through the Vice-Presi- 
dent for Administration. 



Teacher Certification Program Fees 

Students enrolling in the apprenticeship or the internship plan are charged a 
$ 100 registration fee for each semester; an additional $25 registration fee (paid to 
the Office of Continuing Studies) is charged for each summer session. 



Delinquent Accounts 

No student in arrears in any financial obligation to Rice University as of the 
date announced for the completion of registration for any semester can be regis- 
tered. No certificate of attendance, diploma, or transcript of credit is issued at any 
time for a student whose account is in arrears. 

Students who have not made satisfactory arrangements with the Cashier for 
payment of current charges or have moved on campus without executing a 
satisfactory room contract may be discharged from the University. 



TUITION, FEES, AND EXPENSES 1 1 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued on written request made to the Office of the Registrar. 
No transcript is issued without consent of the individual whose record is con- 
cerned. There is a charge of $ 1 for each copy, payable in advance. Those requesting 
transcripts by mail should include payment with the request. 



Living Expenses 

Residence fees, to cover costs of dining halls and operation of residences, are 
established from year to year as requirements dictate. For 198^-89, the yearly 
room and board charge for residence in a residential college isi$4, 175. This charge 
provides room and three meals per day excluding the evening meaTs^n Saturdays 
and Sundays. Meals are not served during the Thanksgiving holidays, midyear, 
fall, and spring midterm recesses, and the spring holidays. Information on optional 
meal plans is available from the College Food Services. When securing room 
assignments for the academic year to follow, each student is required to sign a lease 
agreement. To assure reservation of space, current students must sign a lease by the 
date established in the various colleges, but no later than April 1 5. New students 
are required to make a $50 deposit prior to May 1. These deposits are not 
returnable but are applied against the following semester's charges. The balance of 
the residence fee is payable in installments. The exact amounts and due dates are 
stated in the residential college agreement that each on-campus resident is re- 
quired to sign. 

Students dismissed through the action of duly constituted authority within 
the University from the college or the University for academic or disciplinary 
reasons shall be entitled to a prorata refund or credit of room and board payment 
or charges. Students terminating their residence in the college for any other reason 
shall be entitled to a pro rata refund or credit of the yearly payments or charges less 
a withdrawal fee of $200. The student hereby agrees that the foregoing withdrawal 
shall be liquidated damages for breach of this agreement, and the applicable fee as 
determined from the above will be deducted from the refund. Prorata refunds or 
credits for room and board shall be determined on the basis of regular operating 
school days, i.e., first day of class through last day of finals. (In the event that the 
prorata amount is less than $200, the withdrawal fee shall equal the prorata 
amount.) Termination of residence shall be the date that the student informs the 
master in writing that the student is no longer a resident in the college or the date 
that the space was effectively made available for occupancy by another student, as 
certified by the college master and the Vice-President for Administration or his 
designate, whichever date is later. Any personal belongings of the student remain- 
ing within the room after such space is certified to be available shall be disposed of 
by the University. 

Modifications of the policies concerning refunds shall be made only in excep- 
tional cases. Requests for such exceptions must be made in writing to a committee 
composed of the master of the college concerned, the Vice-President for Student 
Affairs and the Vice-President for Administration by application to the college 
master. 

All items included, the young man or woman entering Rice University in 
August 1988 and living on campus needs to have available about $1 1,400 plus 
transportation the first year. For a student living at home, the cost is about $8,950. 



1 02 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Financial Aid 



The financial aid program at Rice University provides assistance to meet the 
costs of attendance for all students who are admitted and demonstrate computed 
financial need. Through grants, low interest loans, campus work opportunities, or 
a combination of these programs. Rice attempts to give the students sufficient aid 
to meet educational expenses. 

The financial aid program is funded from many sources. Rice University 
receives contributions from alumni and friends; these funds are used to initiate 
and maintain scholarships and loan funds. Federal programs, both grant and loan, 
the state grant program, and the Rice University tuition grant also provide funds. 
Awards are based primarily on financial need. 

The University publishes budgets that realistically sumarize student expenses 
including living costs at home and on- or off-campus, personal expenses and 
necessary travel. 

Parents are expected to contribute according to their means, taking into 
account their income, assets, number of dependents, and other relevant factors. 
Students themselves are expected to contribute from their own assets and earnings, 
including appropriate borrowing against future earnings. 

A brochure entitled Financial Aid at Rice University explains the program of 
assistance in detail. Students may secure a copy from the Office of Admission or 
the Office of Financial Aid. The determination of need is based on information 
supplied through the College Scholarship Service. Need is defined as the amount 
required to meet the difference between the student's total educational expenses 
and the family's resources. 



Application 

To apply for financial assistance, the candidate must file a Rice University 
financial aid application with the University as well as the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF) with the College Scholarship Service. When Rice University receives both 
forms, the applicant is considered for all appropriate assistance administered by 
the University including grants, scholarships, loans, and work. Tax forms will also 
be required. 

Early decision candidates may obtain the Early Version Financial Aid Form 
from Rice University. In order to receive notification of awards at the same time as 
notification of admission, this form and the application for financial aid must be 
filed by November 1 5. Interim Decision candidates must file the Rice University 
financial aid application and the Financial Aid Form by February 1, and Regular 
Decision candidates must file both forms by March 1 in order to receive notifica- 
tion of awards at the same time as notification of admission. Forms filed after these 
dates will be considered as received. There is no deadline for new students. 

Financial aid awards are made on an annual basis and are payable as indicated 
on the award letter. 

Since financial circumstances change from year to year, annual review and 
adjustment of need and awards is necessary. Therefore, continuing students must 
file the Rice University financial aid application with the University and the 



FINANCIAL AID 103 



Financial Aid Form with the College Scholarship Service by June 1 (December 1 
for second semester only) every year in which they desire assistance. 



Financing 

Meeting the costs of higher education in a private university may be difficult 
even though the usual financial analysis indicates no need for financial aid. It is 
understood that even though a family's assets may be adequate to afford the cost of 
tuition, fees, and room and board without financial aid, payment of relatively large 
sums at stated times may require rearrangement of family planning that results in 
hardships or sacrifice. Rice University offers two payment plans to permit financ- 
ing of educational costs. Both require low interest charges. 

A deferred payment plan permits the payment of each semester's charges to be 
divided over four payments. Arrangements are made through the Cashier's Office. 
Applications and details are available each semester at the time of billing. 

Longer term financing is available to eligible students through the Parent 
Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) program. Applications are available in 
the Rice University Office of Financial Aid, and Rice will arrange processing if 
needed. 

Satisfactory Progress Policy for Financial Aid Recipients 

The Higher Education Act of 1 965, as amended by Congress in 1 980, man- 
dates that institutions of higher education maintain minimum standards of "satis- 
factory progress" in order for students to receive financial aid. 



Policy for Undergraduate Students 

1. Financial Aid Probation. A student is placed on financial aid probation if at 
the end of any semester: (a) the student has a cumulative grade point average less 
than 1.67, or (b) the student's grade point average for that semester is less than 
1 .67. The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which the 
student is enrolled at the University. 

2. Financial Aid Ineligibility. A student is ineligible for financial aid if at the 
end of any semester: (a) the student earns grades that would result in financial aid 
probation a third time, or (b) the student earns a grade point average less than 1 .00 
for that semester, except for students completing their first semester at Rice. 

3. Reinstatement of Financial Aid Eligibility. The period of financial aid 
eligibility is normally at least one semester. To regain eligibility, the student must 
address a letter of petition to the Committee on Student Financial Aid foUowmg 
the same instructions which apply to the readmission of suspended students as 
written in the Rice University General Announcements. Suspended students 
readmitted by the Committee on Examinations and Standing need not petition the 
Committee on Student Financial Aid if the conditions in Section 5 have been met. 

4. Requirements for Students Regaining Financial Aid Eligibility. A student 
regaining financial aid eligibility will again become ineligible if in any succeeding 
semester he/she fails to achieve either: (a) a cumulative and semester grade point 
average of at least 1.67, or (b) a semester average of at least 2.00. Ineligibility a 



1 04 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

second time will result in at least two semesters without aid. Normally a student 
will not again receive aid after a third ineligibility. 

5. Maximum Time Frame to Complete Educational Objective. Undergraduate 
students are eligible to receive financial aid for 10 semesters (except Rice Tuition 
Grant — see Section "C" of "Rice University — Financial Aid Policies and 
Procedures"). All semesters for which a student has a transcript in the Registrar's 
Office are counted in the 10 semester limitation even if no financial aid was 
received. To make normal satisfactory progress, a student must earn a minimum of 
1 8 semester hours credit by the end of the first academic year, 44 semester hours 
credit by the end of the second year, 70 semester hours credit by the end of the third 
year, and 96 semester hours credit by the end of the fourth year. A student who is 
ineligible because of insufficient semester hours credit may be considered eligible 
for aid only when enough credits, including incomplete courses, have been com- 
pleted to make up the credit shortage. The academic year commences with the first 
day of classes of the fall semester and continues to the first day of classes the 
following fall. 



Policy for Graduate Students 

Satisfactory academic progress will be determined by the student's depart- 
ment at the end of each academic year but the student must have at least a 2.33 
cumulative GPA. 



Notification for All Students 

The Office of Financial Aid will notify, by letter, any student qualifying for 
financial assistance who does not meet minimum satisfactory progress and who is 
being terminated from aid. Following the fall semester, notices are considered 
delivered when sent to the colleges of undergraduate students and to the depart- 
ments of graduate students. Following the spring semester, notices will be sent to 
the most recent permanent address provided to the Registrar by the student and 
are considered delivered. 



Appeals for All Students 

Any student deemed ineligible for financial aid due to lack of satisfactory 
progress has the opportunity to appeal such action to the Committee on Student 
Financial Aid. Appeals must be made in writing to the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee. Mitigating circumstances will be considered. 



Student Loan Funds 

Perkins Loans (fomerly NDSL) are awarded by the Office of Financial Aid to 
help meet the self-help portion of aid under Rice University packaging policy. 

A few endowments have been established for student loans primarily as 
memorial tributes. These funds are in addition to the normal financial aid pro- 
gram. They are used for emergency loans to students who experience unexpected 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 05 

financial problems during a term or for a student who shows additional need 
beyond regular eligibility. 

Karl Bailey-William Carroll Memorial Loan Fund 

Frank McFadden Caldwell Loan Fund 

Louise Adele Drenkle Loan Fund 

Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund 

Gulf Oil Educational Foundation Loan Fund 

Houston Bridge League Loan Fund 

Benjamin S. Lindsey and Veola Noble Lindsey Memorial Loan Fund 

Lora B. Peck Loan Fund 

Rice Institute Loan Fund 

Students Memorial Loan Fund 

Owen Wister Literary Society Alumnae Loan Fund 



Student Employment 

Employment is available to students interested in working part time during 
the academic year. These work opportunities are available both on campus and off 
campus. Students seeking employment should apply directly to the Financial Aid 
Office. 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission offers assistance for tuition and 
nonrefundable fees to students who have certain disabling conditions if their 
vocational objectives have been approved by a TRC counselor. Examples of such 
conditions are orthopedic deformities, emotional disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, 
and heart conditions. Other services are also available to assist the handicapped 
student in becoming employable. Application for such service should be made at 
the Texas Rehabilitation Commission. Students with visual handicaps should 
contact the Texas State Commission for the Blind. 



Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards 



Alumni and friends of Rice University have generously endowed many 
awards and scholarships, some of which are given strictly on the basis of entrance 
qualifications or performance at Rice. Students do not make separate application 
for these awards since every admitted or attending student is eligible for 
consideration. 

For other awards, demonstrated need is an additional factor and evidence of 
need must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid. Some awards may have 
additional criteria. 



1 06 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Further information concerning the donors is available from the Office of 
Financial Aid, the Office of the Vice-President for Student Affairs, or the Office of 
Admission. 



General Awards and Scholarships 

I. Administered Through the Office of Financial Aid 

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation Scholarship 
Joe L. and Barbara Allbritton Scholarship 
Florrie Ethel and M. E. Andrews Scholarship 
Robert and Elaine Andrews Scholarship 
Association for Systems Management Scholarship 
Max Autrey Memorial Scholarship 
Axson Club, Ellen Axson Wilson Scholarship 
Axson Club, Katie B. Howard Scholarship 
Axson Club, Special Scholarship Honoring Mrs. A. S. Foote 
Axson Club, Pauline M. Crouch Scholarship 
Axson Club, Elanor Trotter Huddleston Scholarship 
R. C. Baker Foundation Scholarship 
James Foulds Barbour Scholarship 
Eric and Arabella Beall Scholarship 
H. Leroy Bell Scholarship 
Mr. and Mrs. Val T. Billups Scholarship 
Kyriakouli Bitzes Scholarship 
Beverly and Donald Bonham Scholarship 
Weldon Brigance Scholarship 
Fletabel Denton Briggs Memorial Scholarships 
Brown and Root Officers Scholarships Honoring George R. Brown 
Harriana Butler Scholarship 
Clyde and Ethel Butcher Scholarship 
George Alva Chatfield Scholarship 
Class of 1921 Scholarship 
Class of 1 929 Scholarship 
Class of 1 930 Scholarship 
Class of 1931 Scholarship 
Class of 1 932 Scholarship 
Class of 1 933 Scholarship 
Class of 1 934 Scholarship 
Class of 1 935 Scholarship 
Class of 1936 Scholarship 
Class of 1 937 Scholarship 
Class of 1938 Scholarship 
College Bowl Champions Scholarship 
Arthur B. Cohn Scholarship 
William Arthur Combs Scholarship 
Millie Tutt Cook Scholarship 
Kenneth Wallace Cunningham Scholarship 
Daughters of the American Revolution, John McKnitt Alexander 
Scholarship 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 07 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Fannie Bess Emery 

Montgomery Scholarship 
Daughters of the American Revolution, Lady Washington Texas 

Centennial Award 
Decade 1975 Scholarship 
Decade 1976 Scholarship 

Thomas A. and Pauline M. Dickson Scholarship 
Thomas P. and Maude Seeger Dow Scholarships 
Epoch Matching Funds 
Thomas Flaxman Scholarship 
Thomas R. and Julia H. Franklin Scholarships 
Joe Gallegly Scholarship 
General University Scholarship Fund 
Glasscock Scholarship 
Richard L. Grider Scholarship 
Lionel B. Hohenthal Scholarships 
Gary Hornberger Scholarship 
Mercer T. Ingram Scholarship 
Interfaith Charities Scholarship 
Meredith H. James Scholarship 
Alfred R. and Eleanor H. Johnson Scholarship 
Grant William Jordan and Cora Jordan Memorial Scholarships 
Julia Merle and Roy Lay Scholarship 
A.C. Lederer, Jr. Scholarship 
Patrons of E. L. Lester and Company Scholarship 
Daniel B. and Mary H. Lovejoy Scholarship 
Genevieve Parkhill Lykes Scholarship 
J. Everett McAshan Scholarship 
Margaret Brokaw McCann Scholarship 
John Charlton McCoy, Jr. Scholarship 
Michael Vincent McEnany Award 
Emma S. McGree Scholarships 
Mclnnis Familv Memorial Scholarship 
James G. and Alberta Matteson McMurtry Scholarship 
Franklin G. and Harriet Chelgren Meek Scholarship 
Achille and Malline Meyer Memorial Scholarship 
Frances Black and Raymond Moers Scholarship 
Elizabeth Morford Scholarship 
Bemey L. Morgan Scholarship 
W. Kyle Morrow, Jr. Scholarship 
Frank Moser and Professor R.A. Tsanoff Scholarship 
Motheral-Neilan Scholarship 
Leon M. Nad Scholarship 

National Action Council for Minority Engineers 
Ida R. and Hanna E. Nussbaum Scholarship 
Rebecca Raphael and Lily G. Nussbaum Scholarship 
Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship 
Raymond Pearson Scholarship 
Elsie Rachlin Scholarship 
Emanuel and Mose Raphael Scholarship 



1 08 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Robert H. Ray Memorial Scholarships 

Ernest R. Rechel Memorial Scholarships 

William J. Reckling Memorial Scholarship 

Hilda Atlas Rich Scholarship 

Mrs. L. A. Richardson Scholarships 

Edith Ripley Scholarship 

Duane Rivers Scholarship in Chemical Engineering 

James M. and Sarah Rockwell Scholarships 

Pamela Davis Rogers Scholarship 

Catherine Withers Roper and Benjamin E. Roper Memorial Scholarship 

Willie Rowell and Ruth Andrews Scholarship 

David Miller Rulfs, Jr. Scholarship 

Anita and Campbell Sewall Scholarship 

Shell Incentive Funds 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Sikes Scholarship 

Samuel T. Sikes, Jr. Scholarship 

Evelyn Slomovitz Memorial Scholarship 

Society of Rice University Women Scholarship 

Southland Paper Mills Foundation Scholarship 

Sara Stratford Scholarship 

Nola McCarty Symms Scholarship 

Hope Pierce Tartt Scholarship 

Beth Turner Scholarship 

USX Foundation Scholarship 

Herschel M. Vaughan Student Scholarship 

Abe and Rae Weingarten Scholarship 

Harris Weingarten Scholarship 

Elizabeth Aldridge Wells Scholarship 

Gordon R. West Scholarship 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

II. Administered Through the Office of Admission 

Astronaut Fund 

Eric and Arabella Beall Scholarship 

Board of Governors Scholarships 

Beverly and Donald Bonham Scholarship 

Class of 1 92 1 Scholarship 

Class of 1 929 Scholarship 

Class of 1 930 Scholarship 

Class of 1931 Scholarship 

Class of 1932 Scholarship 

Class of 1933 Scholarship 

Class of 1 934 Scholarship 

Class of 1935 Scholarship 

Class of 1 936 Scholarship 

Class of 1937 Scholarship 

Class of 1938 Scholarship 

Kenneth Wallace Cunningham Scholarship 

College Bowl Champions Scholarship 

Decade 1975 Scholarship 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 09 

Decade 1976 Scholarship 

George Foundation Scholarship 

Richard L. Grider Scholarship 

Honors Scholarship for Minorities 

Meredith H. James Scholarship 

Leadership Award for Minorities 

Patrons of E.L. Lester and Co. Scholarship 

J.L.C. McFaddin Scholarship 

W.P.H. McFaddin Scholarship 

James G. and Alberta Matteson McMurtry Scholarship 

Franklin G. and Harriet Chelgren Meek Scholarship 

Gilbert A. Metz, Jr. Scholarship 

Elizabeth Morford Scholarship 

Motheral-Neilan Scholarship 

Presidential Scholarship for Minorities 

Robert H. Ray Memorial Scholarship 

Rice Sponsored National Merit Scholarships and National Achievement 

Scholarships 
William Marsh Rice Scholarships 
Pamela Davis Rogers Scholarship 
Volney J. Rose Scholarship 
The Roy Scholarships 
Lee Sharrar Scholarship 
Mr. and Mrs. Sikes Scholarship 
Evelyn Slomovitz Memorial Scholarship 
Southland Paper Mills Foundation Scholarship 
James U. and Margot Teague Scholarship 
Beth Turner Scholarship 
USX Foundation Scholarship 
University Scholars Scholarship 
University Scholarship for Minorities 
Charles K. and Maidie Autry Wilbanks Student Fund 
Dr. Carlton E. Wolters Scholarship 

III. Administered Through the Office of the Vice-President for Student Affairs 

Samuel S. Ashe Scholarship 

Graham Baker Studentship 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Distinguished Scholar 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Honor Scholars 

Board of Governors Scholarships 

Chapman-Bryan Memorial Scholarship 

College Women's Club Scholarship 

Edith Jo Leeseman Dissinger Scholarship 

James H. Durbin Scholarship 

T.C. Edwards Scholarship 

Mary Parker Gieseke Scholar 

Richard P. Goodwin Scholarship 

Annette Schreiber Hill and William Bruce Hill Scholarship 

Gaylord Johnson Scholars 

Mason G. Lockwood Engineering Scholarship 



1 1 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Lottman Scholarships 

Byron Meredith Scholarship 

Torkild Richer Award 

Daniel Ripley Scholars 

Carl A. Robertus and Ellen J. Robertus Scholarship in Science 

The Roy Scholarships 

Richard Steed Scholarships 

Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts 

Blanche White Honor Scholars 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

IV. Miscellaneous 

Paul Frederick Bobb Award 
Barbara Long Chilton Scholarship 
Tom Crumpton Memorial Award 
Susan T. Scanlon Scholarship 
Jameson Fellowship 

Awards and Scholarships in Departmental 
Disciplines 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi Award in Architecture 

American Institute of Architects School Medals 

AIA/AIAF Scholarship 

Edward B. Arrants Award in Architecture 

Rosemary Watkin Barrick Traveling Fellowship 

James H. Chillman, Jr., Prizes 

John Crowder Memorial Scholarship 

William D. Darden Medal 

M. N. Davidson Fellowships 

Featherlite Scholarship in Architecture 

Margaret Everson Fossi Traveling Fellowship 

Gensler Scholarship 

Gene Hackerman Scholarship 

Jesse H. Jones Scholarship in Architecture 

Jameson Fellowship 

Roderick M. Jones Scholarship 

Morris R. Pitman Award 

Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts 

Texas Architectural Foundation Awards 

William Ward Watkin Traveling Fellowship 

Art and Art History 

Art Supply Award 
Kyriakouli Bitzes Scholarship 
Jameson Fellowship 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 1 1 

Mavis C. Pitman Memorial Prize in Art 
Christine Croneis Sayres Memorial Art Award 
Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts 
Texas Art Supply Company Award 

Athletics (Honorary Awards) 

George R. Brown Football Awards 

Emmett Brunson Award 

Walter W. Fondren, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

Gene Hackerman Award 

Catherine Hannah Award 

Joyce Pounds Hardy Award 

Kay Pearson Keating Award 

Eva Jean Lee Award 

Joe F. Lipscomb Freshman Award 

George Martin Award 

T. S. Martino Scholarship 

Harry W. McCormick Scholarship 

Dell Morgan Award 

Jess Neely Football Awards 

Neely-Davis Scholarships 

John Plumbley Memorial Award 

Hally Beth Poindexter Award 

Robert Pilcher Quin Award 

"R" Association Award 

Hugh C. Welsh Scholarship 

Billy Wohn Award 

also 
Bing Crosby Loan Fund 

Bio-Chemistry 

T.J. Vanzant Scholarship 

Chemistry 

Z. W. Salsburg Memorial Awards 

Drama/Theater/English 

Barbara L. Chilton Scholarship 
Susan T. Scanlon Scholarship 

Economics 

Blanche Randall Haden Scholarship 
Omicrom Delta Epsilon Economics Essay Prize 
Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 



1 1 2 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Education 

Donald I. Wood Award 

Engineering 

Herbert Allen Merit Award 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers, South Texas Section, Scholarship 

R. C. Baker Foundation Scholarships 

George R. Brown Scholarship 

Brown Scholarships in Engineering 

Harriana Butler Scholarship 

Gerard A. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Steven G. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Albert Fanestiel Scholarship 

Gulf Foundation Scholarship 

Lillian Haynie Scholarship 

Houston Engineering and Scientific Society Scholarship 

Paul N. Howell Annual Award in Chemical Engineering 

Charles Francis Cyrus Johnson Scholarship 

Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Scholarship 

A. C. Lederer, Jr., Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Paul Alois Lederer Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Mason G. Lockwood Engineering Scholarship 

Lottman Scholarship 

McDermott Incorporated Scholarship 

Gilbert A. Metz Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 

W. L. Moody, Jr., Scholarships in Engineering 

Thomas W. Moore Scholarship in Chemical Engineering 

NL Industries Scholarship 

National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering 

National Society of Professional Engineers Scholarship 

Oshman Scholarships for Women in Engineering 

Rice Engineering Alumni Outstanding Engineering Student Awards 

Hershel M. Rich Invention Award 

Duane M. Rivers Scholarship in Engineering 

Shell Incentive Funds Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Sikes Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 

Samuel T. Sikes, Jr., Scholarship in Engineering 

James Redding Sims Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Sohio Scholarship 

Texaco Scholarship 

USX Foundation Scholarship 

Louis J. Walsh Scholarships/Fellowships in Engineering 

James S. Waters Creativity Award 

English 

Genevieve Parkhill Lykes Scholarship 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 1 3 



French 



Alliance Francoise Scholarship 
Clyde Ferguson Bull Traveling Fellowship 
Pi Delta Phi Andre Bourgeois Award 
William J. Reckling Memorial Scholarship 

Geology and Geophysics 

Chevron Scholarship 

Houston Geological Society Outstanding Scholar Award 

Torkild Richer Award 

Torkild Richer Scholarship 

W.A. Tarr Certificate 

Sam P Worden Award 

German and Slavic Studies 

Max Freund Prize in German 

Dr. and Mrs. Mitchel Fellowship for German and Russian 
Language Study Abroad 

History 

Kyriakouli Bitzes Scholarship 

Mary Hayes Ewing Publication Prize in Southern History 

Jameson Fellowship 

Barbara Field Kennedy Prize in American History 

Clifford Lefton Lawrence Award in British History 

Captain Charles Septimus Longcope Award 

Susie Smith Vandiver Scholarship 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

Human Performance and Health Sciences 

G. L. Hermance Award in Physical Education 
Jill Pitman Jones Award 

Managerial Studies 

H. Russell Pitman Award in Managerial Studies 

Transco Energy Company Scholarships 

Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 

Mathematics 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

Military Science 

American Legion for General Military Excellence Awards 
American Legion/Andrew Jackson Memorial Award 



1 1 4 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Houston Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee Award 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award 

Reserve Officer Association Award Scholarship 

Society of American Military Engineers Award 

Society of American Military Engineers William S. Bailey Scholarship 

Sons of the American Revolution Scholarship 

Music 

Denson Endowed Scholarship for Percussion 

Elva Kalb Dumas Prize in Music 

Lillian H. Duncan Prize in Piano 

Frederick Royal Gibbons Memorial Award 

William E. and Elva F. Gordon Scholarship 

Erwin and Emily Heinen Prize in Music 

Mary Root Kirkland Prize in Voice 

Gwendolyn Jaster Lederer Scholarship in Piano 

Larry J. Livingston Prize in Violin 

Bertha Mallard Scholarship for Music Composition 

Dr. Joseph A. and Ida Kirkland Mullen Scholarships 

Sallie Shepherd Perkins Prize in Music 

Burt Duke Raiza Prize in Piano 

Shepherd Society Awards and Scholarships 

Dorothy Richard Starling Scholarships in Violin 

Naval Science 

American Defense Preparedness Association Scholarship (ADPA) 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Awards 

Chief of Naval Education and Training Scholarship (CNET) 

Distinguished Naval Graduate Award 

Mary Henry Gibson Scholarship 

Jesse H. Jones Naval Scholarships 

Commander F.C. Johnson Award 

Military Affairs Committee, Houston Chamber of Commerce Award 

Navy League Award 

Reserve Officers Association Award 

C. Grady Smith Memorial Award 

Society of American Military Engineers Award 

Texas Society — Sons of the American Revolution Award 

United Services Automobile Association Scholarship Award 

United States Naval Academy Alumni Association Award 

Philosophy 

Jacob and Babette Atlas Prize in Moral Philosophy 
Frank Moser and Professor R.A. Tsanoff Scholarship 
Hilda Atlas Rich Scholarship 
Tsanoff Undergraduate Essay Prizes 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 1 1 5 

Physics 

Claude W. Heaps Prize in Physics 

Political Science 

Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship in Political Science 

Religious Studies 

Aparicio Prize 

Edith Jo Leeseman Dissinger Scholarship 

Rice Institute for Policy Analysis 

Shell Scholar in Public Policy 

Sociology 

Walter and Helen Hall Prize 

Weber-Durkheim Prize for Excellence in Sociology 

Spanish, Portuguese, and Classics 

Barzan Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 
Sacks Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 
Summer Program in Spain Scholarship 
Tsanoff Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 
Robert Wells Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 

College Awards (Some Honorary) 

Marie Alexander Leadership Award 

Athenian Awards 

Donald R. Baker Scholarships 

H. E. Bray Freshman Award 

Franz and Frances Brotzen Award 

J. Dennis Huston Sports Award 

Jones College Scholarships 

Jones Master and President Award 

Leeds Award for Excellence in Scholarship 

John E. Parish Fellowship 

Richardson College Master's Award for Excellence in Scholarship 

Z. W. Salsburg Award 

Jackie Schnell Memorial Scholarship 

Graham C. Stebbings College Service Award 

Corrinne and Radoslav Tsanoff Sophomore and Junior Prizes 

Harry Carothers and Olga Keith Wiess Scholarship 

Olga Keith Wiess Award 

In addition to the above awards, Rice is invited to nominate students for 
several scholarships and fellowships which provide funds for foreign study and 



1 1 6 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

travel or later graduate work. Final selections for these awards are made nationally 
or regionally. 

Edwin, Frederick, and Walter Beinecke Memorial Scholarship 

Churchill Scholarships 

Danforth Fellowships Fulbright-Hays Scholarships 

Latin American Scholarship Program of American Universities, Inc. (LASPAU) 

Scholarships 
Henry Luce Scholarships 
Marshall Scholarships (British) 
Rhodes Scholarship (British) 
Silver Medal of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, 

and Commerce (British) 
Harry S. Truman Scholarships 
Thomas J. Watson Fellowships 

Woodrow Wilson Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship in Women's Studies 
Zonta International Amelia Earhart Aerospace Award 



Honor Societies 



The Phi Beta Kappa society was founded in 1 776 at the College of William and 
Mary for the purpose of recognizing intellectual achievement and the love of 
learning among students in the liberal arts and sciences. The Rice University 
chapter was formally installed on March 1, 1929. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon, an honorary chemical society, promotes high scholar- 
ship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry. The 
Rice chapter was installed in 1927. 

The Pi Delta Phi society, organized to interest students of French in compet- 
ing for high standing in scholarship, authorized in May 1 930 the formation of the 
Theta chapter of Rice. 

The Society of Sigma Xi, for the promotion of research in science, established 
the Beta of Texas chapter at Rice on March 23, 1938. 

The Tau Beta Pi Association, organized to interest engineering students in 
competing for high standing in scholarship, created the Gamma of Texas chapter 
at the University on December 18, 1940. 

Delta Phi Alpha was founded to promote an interest in the German language 
and literature. The National Council authorized the Gamma Xi Chapter at Rice in 
April 1949. 

Sigma Delta Pi was founded to promote an interest in the Spanish language 
and literature. The Rice University chapter was installed on May 1 4, 1 953. 

Tau Sigma Delta is a national honor society in architecture and applied arts. 
The Tau Chapter was established at Rice on May 7, 1 96 1 . 

Eta Kappa Nu was founded in 1904 at the University of Illinois for electrical 
engineering students. The purpose was not just to stimulate and reward scholar- 
ship, but to assist and encourage it members to grow professionally throughout 
their entire lives. The Rice chapter was installed January 1981. 



STUDENT LIFE 117 

Omicron Delta Epsilon was founded to promote study in economics. The Rice 
University chapter was established in 1981. 

Student Life 



Student Responsibility 

Each Rice student is expected to observe standards of conduct consistent with 
respect for the law, the fulfillment of contractual obligations, consideration for the 
rights of others, and a high level of personal integrity. Though the University does 
not intend to supervise the personal lives of its students, all members of the 
University community are encouraged to be aware that their behavior both on 
campus and off campus may reflect on the University. 

The student government, the judicial system, and the honor system depend on 
a willing exercise of responsibility and honor on the part of everyone. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student 
whose conduct may be judged clearly detrimental to the best interests of either the 
student or the University. Such action is taken only after careful consideration by 
the appropriate branches of the student government and/or the faculty and 
administration. 

No individual or group may use the name of the University or one of its 
colleges without prior approval of the University and the college. 



The Honor System 

One of the oldest and proudest traditions at Rice is an honor system adminis- 
tered by a student Honor Council whose members are elected annually by the 
student body. Adopted by a vote of the student body in 1916, the system has 
remained essentially unchanged except for changes in the procedures and mem- 
bership of the Honor Council. 

All written examinations and any specifically designated assignments are 
conducted under the honor code. The student body, through its commitment to the 
honor system, accepts responsibility for assuring the validity of all exammations 
and assignments conducted under the system. The Honor Council is responsible 
for investigtation of all reported violations and for trial in those cases when the 
facts warrant. The Proctor reviews the results of investigations and trials and acts 
upon recommendations for penahies. The Honor Council conducts a continuing 
program to orient new students and faculty to the responsibilities and privileges of 
the system. 



Residential Colleges 

Every undergraduate student, whether living on campus or not, is a member of 
one of eight residential colleges, all of which are coeducational. 

Each college has a faculty master who occupies a house adjacent to the college. 
The master, whose authority derives from the president of the University, has 
overall responsibility for all aspects of student life in the college. He or she is 
especially responsible for encouraging broad cultural and intellectual interests and 



1 1 8 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

for promoting self-discipline and effective self-government within the college. 
Other members of the faculty are invited, upon agreement of the student members 
and the master, to becomed resident and non-resident associates of the college. 
Faculty associates act as advisers to the members and participate in the camarade- 
rie and activities of the college. Colleges also have nonfaculty university associates 
and community associates from the Houston area, drawn from various 
professions. 

Each college is a self-governing group of students whose elected officers and 
representatives are responsible to the master and to the college membership for 
directing a variety of cultural, social, and athletic activities, for the appropriate 
and responsible expenditure of college funds, and for maintaining good order in 
the college. While uniformity among the colleges has never been sought, and each 
college has developed its own particular interests and character, all seek to foster 
fellowship among their members and a mature sense of honor, responsibility, and 
sound judgment. 

Upon acceptance by the University, each undergraduate student is designated 
a member of one of the colleges. Two students who are entering Rice for the first 
time may ask to be assigned to the same college but may not designate which 
college. A new student may request membership in the same college as a close 
relative. No other choice of college is allowed. 

The buildings of each college include a dining hall and living rooms, which are 
available to both resident and nonresident members, and living quarters for 
approximately 215 students from all classes of the University, and all academic 
disciplines. At present, on-campus residential space is available for most of the 
first-year students who request it, but space is not assured until receipt of formal 
notification. Continuing students draw for the available space by the priority and 
lottery system established in each college since the demand exceeds the available 
space. 

The College Food Service provides 19 meals per week, excluding evening 
meals on Saturday and Sunday. Breakfast and lunch meals are cafeteria service, 
and dinner is seated, family style. No meals are provided on designated holidays 
and recesses. Various services provided by the College Food Service for students 
living in the colleges include: (1) assistance with special diets prescribed by a 
physician; (2) sack lunches for students who must miss a meal due to a job conflict; 
(3) sick trays for students when requested by the Student Health service; and (4) 
alternate menu entree, whenever possible, in accordance with students' religious 
practices. 



College Courses 

As one of their important activities, individual colleges sponsor courses and 
workshops open to all students. College courses are initiated by students in the 
colleges during the semester before they are offered. Following approval by the 
master and faculty associates of the college and by the Vice-President for Student 
Affairs, they are accepted for academic credit on the same basis as departmental 
courses and listed by the Registrar each semester during preliminary registration. 
If a college course falls within a definite departmental field, it can, with written 
approval of the departmental chair, count as part of the distribution requirements 
in the category to which that field is assigned. 



STUDENT LIFE 119 

College workshops carry no academic credit and do not appear on a student's 
permanent record. Generally designated for instruction in practical skills, they 
may meet on a regular schedule throughout the semester or be offered as short 
courses. 

By expanding the course offerings of the departments, college courses pro- 
mote the academic involvement of the colleges and provide opportunity for 
interdisciplinary topics of particular interest to students. 



Student Government 

All undergraduates are members of the Rice Student Association, which is 
governed through the Student Senate, composed of the president, two vice- 
presidents, the secretary, treasurer, the eight college presidents, and eight college 
senators. 

Alleged violations of University or college rules are handled in accordance 
with the University Code of Judicial Procedure. In most cases, original jurisdic- 
tion is assigned to student courts, appeal from whose verdict may be made to the 
college master, the proctor, or the University Review Board as appropriate. Final 
appeal is to the president of the University. The Honor Council, which is com- 
posed entirely of students, administers the honor system and conducts hearings 
and trials for alleged offenses against it. The University retains ultimate authority 
in all matters of discipline and over all actions affecting its educational function or 
the safety and well-being of members of the University community. 

The Student Association annually presents two coveted awards, one to a 
student and one to a faculty or staff member. The Rice Service Award, a memorial 
to Hugh Scott Cameron, first dean of students at Rice, is awarded to currently 
enrolled or former members of the Student Association who have rendered distin- 
guished service to the student body. Selection is made by a committee of faculty 
and students appointed by the association. The Mentor Recognition Award recog- 
nizes extraordinary service to the student body by a current member of the faculty 
or staff. 



Student Activities 

In addition to the many activities of the residential colleges, various campus- 
wide organizations and activities give students a wide range of choices for extra- 
curricular interests. The official publications include the Thresher, the student 
newspaper, the Campanile, the university annual; and the University Blue, a 
literary publication. The Rice Program Council sponsors various programs of 
current interest to the student body as well as social functions. A campus radio 
station, KTRU, is operated by students on an 18-hour, seven-day-a-week sched- 
ule, broadcasting FM stereo. 

A large number of student organizations provide for special interests, such as 
the Black Student Union, the Hispanic Association for Cultural and Educational 
Revitalization, the Chinese Student Association, Rice Young Democrats, and 
Young Republicans. There are sports clubs for sailing, karate, rugby, lacrosse, 
soccer, etc. A student debate society, a premed society, and a prelaw society serve 
other student interests. 



1 20 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Many organizations are associated with special academic and professional 
disciplines, such as foreign language clubs, the Architectural Society, the student 
affiliates of the American Institute of Architects, the American Chemical Society, 
and the student branches of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the 
American Institute of Physics, the American Society of Civil Engineers,' the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Association for Computing Ma- 
chinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. 

The Rice Players is an extracurricular theater group composed of Rice stu- 
dents and faculty. The Players present at least four productions each year. Recent 
productions include: John Guare's "Marco Polo Sings a Solo", Milan Kundera's 
"Jacques and His Master," Three One-Act Plays, and an original production of 
"Universified" by Tom Senning, Rice '88. The Players welcome participation by 
anyone interested in any aspect of theater production or management. 

Rice students are affiliated with a number of denominational religious organi- 
zations. These include the Baptist Student Union, Canterbury Association, Chris- 
tian Science Organization, Hillel Society, Lutheran Student Association, Newman 
Club, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and the Wesley Foundation. Many of 
these clubs are assisted by local clergy, who form the Joint Campus Ministry. 



The Student Health Service 

The Student Health Service fee, paid annually by undergraduate and graduate 
students, makes available to students both the Student Health Service and the Rice 
Counseling and Psychiatric Service. The care and services provided by the Health 
Service and the Rice Counseling and Psychiatric Service are described in informa- 
tion available from either Service or from the Office of Student Activities. 

The Student Health Service is an outpatient primary care clinic located on 
campus in the north wing of Hanszen College. The clinic is staffed by two 
physicians and two nurses. Clinic hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday- 
Friday through the undergraduate school year. 

After hours and weekend medical care is provided by Park Plaza Hospital. For 
treatment in the emergency room at Park Plaza Hospital students must identify 
themselves as members of Rice University by presenting their Rice I.D. cards. 
Students should also have available medical insurance information. Students will 
be billed for services provided by Park Plaza. Students are responsible for all 
medical bills for blood test. X-rays, and physician care outside of the Health 
Service. 

In serious emergencies call the Health Service (University extension x4966 
during work hours). Campus Police (x3333), Houston Fire Department (227- 
2323), Park Plaza Hospital Emergency Room (527-5134). 

The Health Service is open from the first day of Orientation Week until the 
day before Commencement. The Health Service is closed during the Christmas 
break and Thanksgiving and Easter weekends, but is open during mid-term breaks 
in the mornings only. 

The Health Service provides the following: 

1 . Primary care for illness and injury with referral to specialist when needed. 

2. Maintenance of health record for all students and administration of 
immunizations. 

3. Contraceptive counseling and routine Pap Smears. 



STUDENT LIFE 121 

4. Administration of allergy injections with serum provided by student after 
specialist allergy work-up. 

5. Physical examinations for employment, transfer to another school, schol- 
arship expeditions. 

Confidentiality. The Student Health physician/patient relationship and confi- 
dentiality is absolute, except where the individual student may be deemed a 
significant health risk to other students. 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance may be 
purchased through the University at two levels of coverage, described in a bro- 
chure that is sent to incoming students each summer. Brochures and applications 
may also be obtained from the Cashier's Office or the Office of Student Activities. 
Rice's group coverage will be effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1988, until 
12:01 a.m., August 15, 1989. Dependent coverage is also available. If you have 
other medical insurance, a waiver card showing proof of insurance must be signed 
and returned to the Cashier's Office by August 1 5, prior to the beginning of classes, 
to avoid automatic billing for coverage. 

The Rice Counseling and Psychiatric Service, which is staffed in cooperation 
with the Department of Psychiatry of the Baylor College of Medicine, provides 
help to students with many types of problems. The health fee includes this service 
although the Psychiatric Service is independent of the Student Health Service. 
Consultation and brief psychotherapy are available without additional charge. 
When it is clear that more prolonged counseling or treatment is necessary, the 
individual may be referred to a private physician or a clinic at his or her own 
expense or as covered by health insurance. An appointment may be made directly 
by a student either by phone or in person at the office of the Service. Provisions 
have been made for emergency situations that occur outside office hours. The 
confidential relationship between doctor and patient is carefully maintained as 
necessary for the effectiveness of the service. 

Nonstudent spouses of students, both graduate and undergraduate, may 
participate in both Health Service and Psychiatric Service if they pay the health 
fee. The spouse must obtain an ID and have it validated through the Cashier's 
Office once the Health Service fee has been paid. 

Brochures describing the Health Service, Psychiatric Service, and student 
health insurance are available in the Health Service Office, the Psychiatric Service 
Office, and in the Office of Student Activities. 



The Fondren Library 

With a collection approaching 1.4 million volumes, 1.8 million microforms, 
and 12,500 current periodical and other serial titles, the Fondren Library' is 
strongly committed to supporting the research and information needs of Rice's 
students and faculty and it provides extensive resources for advanced study and 
research. Among the notable research collections are the Menil Collection in art 
and art history, the Nadler German language and literature collection, as well as 
strong collections in Austrian history, architecture, engineering, American histo- 
ry, French literature, and the natural sciences. Bibliographic access is provided 
through LIBRIS, the Fondren's automated catalog. 

The library is also a depository for United States Government documents and 
for United States patents, as well as a University affiliate for the U.S. Census data. 



1 22 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Woodson Research Center is the repository of the library's rare books, 
manuscripts, and University archives. Special collections, including Civil War 
imprints, Texana, eighteenth -century English drama, the papers and scientific 
library of Sir Julian Huxley, the Anderson Collection on the History of Aeronau- 
tics, as well as numerous literary and historical manuscript holdings are available 
for research at the center. Large microform sets of research materials such as Early 
American Imprints, papers of a number of United States presidents, and newspa- 
pers are also available. 

The Fondren's open shelf policy enables patrons to locate materials easily. 
The reference/collection development librarians provide assistance in the use of 
library materials and in computer searches of over four hundred subject data 
bases. Special facilities such as individual study carrels, group study rooms, audio- 
visual facilities, microform reading carrels, word processing, and photodupli- 
cating equipment are also available in the library. 



The Rice Memorial Center — Ley Student Center 

The Rice Memorial Center, built through the generosity of friends and alum- 
ni, was dedicated on Homecoming weekend in the fall of 1958. The Ley Student 
Center was added through similar generosity and dedicated in the fall of 1 986. The 
Rice Memorial Chapel is an integral part of the student center complex. 

The Center serves as a gathering place for students and the University com- 
munity, providing a variety of services, offices, and meeting facilities. The Rice 
Memorial Center houses the Association of Rice Alumni, Career Planning and 
Placement, Student Activities Office, Minority Affairs Office, the Rice Student 
Volunteer Program, the Rice Campus Store, Sammy's (snack bar and cafeteria), 
Willy's Pub and the MOB (Marching Owl Band). The Ley Student Center is the 
home of the Office of Student Advising, the International Student Office, the 
Student Association, the Graduate Student Association, KTRU, the Thresher, the 
Campanile, the Rice Program council and various other student organizations. 

The student center meeting facilities are available to the University commu- 
nity for meetings, parties, dinners, concerts, weddings, and special events. The 
Grand Hall, Farnsworth Pavilion, Brown Garden, Rice Memorial Chapel, Kelley 
Lounge, Ray Memorial Court, and conference rooms provide a variety of spaces 
for formal and informal meetings and special events. 

Career Planning and Placement Office 

The Career Planning and Placement Office offers career counseling, individu- 
ally and in groups, to assist undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni in 
finding or changing employment. Placement facilities are available for the inter- 
viewmg of students and alumni for prospective employment by representatives 
from business, industry, and schools. Representatives from universities and pro- 
fessional schools also interview candidates for advanced study. 



STUDENT LIFE 123 

Institute for Computer Services and Applications 

ICSA, the Institute for Computer Services and Applications, operates Rice 
University's central computing facility, which supports many computing needs in 
the areas of education, research, and administration. Based in Seeley G. Mudd 
Lab, ICSA supports approximately 50 terminals for direct computer interaction 
and dial-up ports for telephone access to a National Advanced Systems AS/9000-2, 
an IBM compatible mainframe computer. In addition, ICSA's computing sites 
contain approximately 60 Macintosh and IBM microcomputers. Accounts on Sun 
Workstations are available for special research projects. The Administrative 
Student information Database is maintained on a PRIME 2755. ICSA's user 
services group, the Computing Resource Center (CRC), provides consulting ser- 
vices, training programs, printed documentation, news bulletins, online informa- 
tion systems, and a computing reference facility. 

Through course accounts. Rice students have access to a wide variety of 
languages and applications on the AS/9000 and educational Sun network. In 
addition, special accounts are provided for personal educational computing, and 
students can use microcomputers for writing papers, programming, and other 
applications. 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

A charter member of the Southwest Athletic Conference and a Division I 
member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Rice fields teams in 
football, basketball, baseball, track, swimming, tennis, and golf for men - -and in 
basketball, volleyball, track, swimming, and tennis for women. Home football 
games are played in the beautiful 70,000-seat Rice Stadium. Autry Court for 
basketball and volleyball, Cameron Field for baseball, the Jake Hess Tennis 
Stadium and the Rice Track Stadium round out a complex of outstanding athletic 
facilities. Dedicated to the pursuit of high-level athletic goals for true student- 
athletes. Rice prides itself on its dual goal of excellence in both the academic 
program and the athletic arena, and refuses to use the rigors of either as an excuse 
for less than high quality performance in the other. 



Intramural Sports 

The Department of Human Performance and Health Sciences offers a super- 
vised program of intramural sports for all students. An individual may participate 
in individual, dual, and team sports. Any interested students may form teams for 
the wide variety of tournaments. A student must compete in the University 
intramural tournaments to become eligible to represent his/her college in the 
college team sports tournaments which follow the open tournaments. In the past 
few years, over 4,000 entries from the student population have participated in 40 
tournaments. (Students participate at their own risk.) 



1 24 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Sports Clubs 

The Department of Human Performance and Health Sciences administers a 
Sports Club Program. A sports club is a special interest group organized to engage 
in and promote interest in a recreational physical activity. Clubs are organized in 
bowling, cycling, fencing, lacrosse, martial arts, rifle and pistol, rugby, soccer, 
sailing, volleyball, ultimate frisbee, and water polo. These groups are formed to 
increase individual and team skills through a continuing instructional and com- 
petitive program. Club activities are supported by individual contributions, mem- 
bership dues. University funds, and fund-raising activities. (Students participate 
at their own risk.) 



Student Automobiles 

All student vehicles must be registered with the Traffic Division of the Rice 
University Police Department. Students must park in assigned areas and observe 
University regulations. Illegally parked or unregistered vehicles are subject to tow 
away and/or fines assessed by the University. Copies of the University Traffic and 
Parking Regulations, which detail student privileges and responsibilities, may be 
obtained from the Traffic Division of the University Police. 




> I 



">8^^ 



Information for 
Graduate Students 



Since the opening of the university in 1912, the importance of graduate study 
and research as a principal means of advancing knowledge has been recognized. 
The first Doctor of Philosophy degree was awarded in 1 9 1 8 in mathematics. Since 
that time, the graduate area has been expanding through the basic sciences, the 
humanities, engineering, the social sciences, architecture, music, and administra- 
tion and includes interdepartmental areas. The number of graduate programs has 
steadily increased, and advanced degrees are now offered in 33 fields of study. 

Graduate programs are of two types, research and professional. Research 
programs lead to the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Architecture, Master of Arts 
and Master of Science degrees. Professional programs provide advanced course 
work in scientific disciplines, but do not generally include independent research. 
They lead to the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts, Master in Applied Mathemati- 
cal Sciences, Master of Accounting, Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture 
in Urban Design, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Business Administration 
(which includes public and nonprofit management). Master of Chemical Engi- 
neering, Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Computer Science, Master of 
Electrical Engineering, Master of Environmental Engineering, Master of Environ- 
mental Science, Master of Materials Science, Master of Mechanical Engineering, 
Master of Music, and Master of Statistics. 

All degrees conferred by the university are awarded solely in recognition of 
educational attainments, not as warranty of future employment or admission to 
other programs of higher education. 



Research Degrees 



The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is awarded for original studies in account- 
ing, anthropology, biochemistry, biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil 
engineering, computer science, economics, electrical and computer engineering, 
English, environmental science and engineering, French, geology, German, histo- 
ry, hnguistics, materials science, mathematical sciences, mathematics, mechanical 
engineering, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religious studies, 
statistics, space physics and astronomy. In architecture, the equivalent degree is 
the Doctor of Architecture. These degrees are awarded after successful completion 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 127 

of a program of advanced study and an original investigation reported in an 
approved thesis. As final evidence of preparation for this degree, the candidate 
must pass a public oral examination. 

The degree of Master of Arts is available in the various humanities listed 
above plus art history and Spanish and in scientific fields of study, including the 
social sciences. The Master of Science degree may be obtained in the fields of 
chemical, civil, electrical and computer engineering, mechanical engineering, 
computer science, environmental science and engineering, materials science/ 
engineering, and space physics and astronomy. The Master of Architecture, 
Master of Architecture in Urban Design, and Master of Music are also offered as 
research degrees, with a thesis option. 

The Master of Arts or Master of Science degree, or the Master of Architecture 
or Master of Music research degree, may be awarded after completion of at least 30 
semester hours of study, including the thesis, 24 of which must be done at Rice. The 
residency requirement (full-time study at the University) is one semester. Pro- 
grams generally include original work embodied in a thesis, and the candidate's 
preparation is evidenced by a public examination. Most students require three or 
four semesters to complete such a program, although some programs may be 
longer. In many departments, students may be awarded a master's degree on the 
basis of achieving candidacy for the doctoral degree. Such an award must be 
approved prior to April 1 of the year in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Foreign language requirements for the master's and doctoral degrees are 
established by the individual departments according to the need for foreign 
languages in the conduct of research and scholarship in their respective fields. 

Information on candidacy, the oral defense of thesis, and thesis regulations is 
given under Academic Regulations, beginning on page 1 34. More specific infor- 
mation about requirements for advanced degrees in each field of study is given 
under department headings in the section of the catalog which begins on page 1 45. 
Additional material may be obtained from the appropriate department chair. 

Professional Degrees 



Rice University offers several advanced degree programs which prepare 
students for positions in fields such as accounting, business administration, public 
and nonprofit management (see accounting and administrative science), architec- 
ture, mathematical sciences, computer science, engineering, and secondary educa- 
tion; in some departments, such degrees prepare the student for a doctoral level 
program. In addition, a non-thesis Doctor of Musical Arts degree is awarded after 
completion of a program of advanced study and required performances or original 
compositions. (If the field of emphasis is composition, a major work is presented as 
a thesis.) 

Requirements for these degrees include the successful completion of 30 
semester hours or more of advanced courses (numbei ed 300 or higher). At least 24 
of these 30 hours must be taken at Rice. Additional information is presented in this 
catalog under the departmental listings in the Courses of Instruction section 
beginning on page 145 and in the Academic Regulations section, beginning on 
page 1 34. In each case, application materials are available from the department. 



1 28 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Accounting and Administrative Science 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration offers two professional 
degrees, the Master of Business Administration (which includes a concentration in 
public and nonprofit management) and the Master of Accounting. Completion of 
either professional degree program requires two academic years. (Rice undergrad- 
uates may complete the Master of Accounting program in one year of graduate 
study if they have taken a prescribed set of prerequisite courses by the end of their 
senior year. Please see pp. 75 and 147 for information.) To qualify for either 
degree, the student must maintain a "B" (3.0) average and may be required to pass 
a special examination during the last semester in residence. There is no thesis 
requirement, although there is a thesis option in the Master of Accounting degree. 

Applicants must submit scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT), all college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation, as well as 
specified essays. Admission to the Jones Graduate School is open to undergradu- 
ates from Rice and other universities, regardless of undergraduate major, but is 
highly selective and limited to those who have performed with distinction in their 
previous academic work and on the GMAT. No specific undergraduate course 
work is required for admission to either master's degree program. However, 
undergraduates contemplating graduate work in accounting or administrative 
science are encouraged to take course work in accounting, microeconomics, and 
computing. College mathematics through calculus is helpful. 

The Jones Graduate School offers an accelerated degree plan, known as the 
"five-year" plan for highly qualified undergraduates. Under the "five-year" plan, 
a Rice student may enter the Jones Graduate School at the end of his or her junior 
year; normally all the undergraduate major requirements must have been complet- 
ed by that time. Ordinarily, the bachelor's degree is awarded at the end of the 
fourth year, and the master's degree in accounting or business administration at 
the end of the fifth year. The application process is the same for a "five-year" 
applicant as for a regular applicant. 



Architecture 

Degrees of Master of Architecture and Master of Architecture in Urban 
Design are offered. Completion of either degree requires two or more academic 
years. An applicant for admission should write to the Dean of the Rice University 
School of Architecture for specific information about the program for which the 
applicant would be qualified by education and experience. Completed application 
materials include the Rice University Application for Graduate Study form, 
transcript(s), Graduate Record Examination scores, a portfolio of the applicant's 
work, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. 



Computer Science 

The Master of Computer Science degree requires completion often advanced 
courses approved by the Department of Computer Science, in accordance with 
general practices stated under Engineering, below. The program for each student is 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 129 

formulated in consultation with a departmental adviser. The areas of concentra- 
tion are algorithms, compiler construction, operating systems, and programming 
languages. 



Education 

The Master of Arts in Teaching is a professional degree program for students 
wishing to qualify for secondary school teaching following a liberal undergraduate 
education. The program normally requires completion of 1 1 advanced courses 
with grades of "B" or higher. All courses must be approved by the Department of 
Education. 

Admission requires that the applicant have a bachelor's degree, scholarly 
ability and motivation, and an interest in teaching at the secondary school level. 
Each applicant will be expected to take the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination. Applications are reviewed by members of the Rice University 
Teacher Education Council. Other requirements for the Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing are found in the Department of Education section of the Courses of Instruction 
listing. 

Students in the program are not normally eligible for Rice University Gradu- 
ate Fellowships or scholarship support since cooperating school districts pay 
students a salary for internship teaching. However, a limited number of tuition 
waivers may be available. 



Engineering 

Non-thesis master's degrees are offered in the branches of engineering listed 
below. A completed bachelor's degree in a relevant field is required for admission. 
Candidates are required to complete 30 hours of approved advanced courses 
(numbered 300 or higher). These advanced courses include at least four at the 500- 
or 600-level, indicating professional study in depth of a particular area. Courses 
counting toward these 30 hours may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. The student's 
major department must approve the overall program, and any departure from 
these guidelines must be approved in the Graduate Office. 

Chemical Engineering. Flexibility in course planning permits specialization in 
such areas as economics, biochemical engineering, reservoir engineering, process 
control, optimization and systems analysis, applied mathematics, materials sci- 
ence, kinetics, and catalysis. 

Civil Engineering. The area of concentration is structures and mechanics. 
Some specialization in solid mechanics, geotechnical engineering, or applied 
mathematics is possible within the structures and mechanics concentration. 

Electrical and Computer Engineering. Technical electives permit some spe- 
cialization in the general areas of bioengineering, communication and control 
theory, electro-optics and physical electronics, and computer science and 
engineering. 



1 30 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Environmental Science. Major emphasis of the degree program is in the areas 
of environmental biology, environmental chemistry and toxicology, surface and 
ground water hydrology, water pollution control, environmental geology, and 
environmental planning. 

Environmental Engineering. Major emphasis of the degree program is in the 
areas of hydrology and water resources engineering, water and wastewater treat- 
ment design and operation, water pollution control, and numerical modeling. 

Materials Science and Engineering. The student takes an approved program 
of courses in materials science and engineering or related fields plus two appropri- 
ate electives. Students may enter this degree program following undergraduate 
preparation in any of a number of related fields in addition to materials science/ 
engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering. Rexibility in course requirements permits speciali- 
zation in thermal sciences and energy conversion, gas dynamics, hydrodynamics, 
computer-aided design, stress analysis and mechanical behavior of materials, and 
aerospace engineering. 



Mathematical Sciences 

The Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences degree requires satisfactory 
completion of 30 semester hours of approved course work beyond a bachelor's 
degree in an appropriate field. Concentrations are possible in numerical analysis, 
operations research, and physical mathematics. Candidates for admission are 
evaluated on their previous academic records and their potential for success in and 
benefit from the professional program. 



Music 

The Shepherd School offers the Master of Music degree in the following areas: 
composition, choral and instrumental conducting, historical musicology, per- 
formance, and music theory. An audition is required as part of the admission 
process for instrumental and conducting applicants. Composition majors are 
required to submit a portfolio of their works, and musicology and theory majors 
should submit samples of their written work. The Graduate Record Examination 
(both the Aptitude and Advanced Music Tests) is required of musicology, theory, 
and composition majors. The faculty of the Shepherd School may determine that 
additional work at the undergraduate level is needed. 

The precise minimum hourly requirements for the Master of Music degree 
vary from 43 to 57 according to major area. For a description of the requirements 
for a particular Master of Music degree, write to the Shepherd School of Music, 
Graduate Admissions. 

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree, offered in selected areas, requires 90 hours 
beyond the bachelor's degree. For further information on the DMA program, write 
to The Shepherd School of Music, Graduate Admissions. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 1 3 1 



Statistics 



The Master of Statistics degree requires satisfactory completion of ten 
approved courses. Study is in the fields of applied probability, biomathemat- 
ics, data analysis, density estimation, epidemiology, image processing, model 
building, quality control, statistical computing, stochastic processes, time 
series analysis. 

Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Programs 

Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs. Opportunities are available for interdis- 
ciplinary study in various aspects of systems theory, solid-state electronics, materi- 
als science/engineering, and bioengineering. For applications or additional infor- 
mation, contact the chair of one of the participating departments as follows: for 
systems theory, the Department of Chemical Engineering, Economics, Electrical 
and Computer Engineering, or Mathematical Sciences; for solid-state electronics 
and materials science/engineering. Chemistry, Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing, Mechanical Engineering, or Physics; for bioengineering. Chemical Engineer- 
ing, Electrical Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering. 

Joint Graduate Programs with Medical Colleges. Joint programs with the 
Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas Medical School are 
designed to provide educational experiences of high quality leading to research 
careers in medicine. These programs lead to joint M.D./Ph.D. or joint M.D./M.A. 
or M.D./M.S. degrees. Such programs can be worked out individually through 
various departments. 

Joint Graduate Programs in History and Law. This selective program com- 
bines graduate work in legal and constitutional history at Rice University with 
professional work in law at the Bates College of Law, University of Houston, or at 
the Thurgood Marshall School of Law of Texas Southern University. Students in 
their first or second year of law school may apply for admission to Rice through 
their law school. Participants spend one year at Rice in the Master of Arts program 
concentrating on legal and constitutional history. After completing this year of 
residence and all requirements for the M. A. except the thesis, the student returns to 
law school to finish his or her legal studies. During the last year of law school, the 
student completes a suitable M. A. -level research thesis on a topic in legal and/or 
constitutional history selected with the approval of the law school instructor and 
the student's Rice history adviser. The student who completes this program 
receives a law degree from his or her law school as well as an M.A. in history from 
Rice. 

Joint Graduate Program in Medical Ethics. Under an agreement with the 
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, a cooperative program of 
graduate study in medical ethics is offered, leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees 
in religious studies from Rice University. Also, under an agreement with the 
Baylor College of Medicine and the Institute of Religion, a cooperative program in 
medical ethics is offered, leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy from 
Rice. 

Rice Center. Rice Center is an off-campus, not-for-profit research organiza- 
tion affiliated with Rice University. Its purpose is to facilitate research and 
dissemination of knowledge regarding the planning, financing, and operation of 



1 32 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

communities. Its full-time research staff of 32 conducts research in the areas of real 
estate, regional economics and demographics, transportation, and public services/ 
community impacts. Rice Center offers opportunities for applied interdiscipli- 
nary research to students and faculty from the schools of Administration, Archi- 
tecture, and Social Sciences. 



Non-degree Programs 
Class III 

Students with a "B" (3.0) or better grade average and an undergraduate or 
graduate degree from an accredited college or university may apply for admission 
as Class III students to take courses for credit without being admitted to a specific 
degree program. Permission of instructor (and in some cases, a department) and 
approval by the Dean of Continuing Studies are required. 

Courses taken under this arrangement cannot be used to fulfill the require- 
ments for a degree at Rice unless and until the student has been accepted into a 
degree program by an academic department (and in the case of graduate students 
by the Graduate Council), and the department has approved a special request that 
the Class III course count toward the degree. It is the student's responsibility to 
ensure that the proper appeals have been obtained. Normally, no more than three 
courses taken as a Class III student can be applied toward a graduate degree. Class 
III students cannot take courses on a pass/fail basis. 

An application and course request form can be obtained from the Office of 
ContinuingStudiesandSpecialPrograms, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas, 77251- 
1892. 

Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended should be 
mailed directly from previously attended institutions to the Office of Continuing 
Studies at Rice. A student who has attended Rice as a Class III student must still 
complete continuation forms for each semester and submit them by the deadlines. 
These materials will be sent upon request from the Office of Continuing Studies. 
Deadlines for all applications are the respective workdays closest to August 1, 
December 1 and May 1 5 (Summer School). 

The tuition for 1988-89 (subject to change) is $225 per semester hour; the total 
tuition not to exceed $2,650 per semester. In addition, a $50 application fee is due 
each semester. All fees are payable during registration, which must be completed 
by the end of the second week of class. Persons submitting applications not 
completed by the deadline must pay a late application fee of $50. This late fee will 
also be charged continuing Class III students who do not complete continuation 
forms by the above deadlines. For some courses students may be charged for 
computer time. If a class is filled with degree students. Class III students may be 
dropped up to the end of the third week of class. In that case, the tuition (less $25 of 
the registration) will be refunded. 

Because Class III is not a degree granting program, foreign graduate students 
enrolled as Class III students cannot receive visas from Rice University. Persons 
who are B-2 visitors may be ineligible for enrollment as Class III students. A 
determination will be made by the Dean of Continuing Studies and the Foreign 
Student Advisor. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 1 33 

Faculty, staff and their spouses may apply and receive a tuition waiver; 
however, they must apply, pay all fees and observe all deadlines. 

For an application or for further information, please contact the Office of 
Continuing Studies and Special Programs at (7 1 3) 520-6022 or 527-4803. 



Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduate study is open to well-qualified students who possess adequate 
background in the field of study they wish to pursue. Normally, but not always, the 
equivalent of an undergraduate major in the field is required, but the final 
judgment of preparation rests with the department concerned. The emphasis is on 
the quality of the applicant's preparation rather than on the academic program 
pursued or credits earned in achieving it. 

Applicants for admission to graduate study should address all communica- 
tions to the chair of the appropriate department, who will provide the application 
form and relevant information about the program. The completed form, with 
transcript and recommendations, should be returned to the department chair. 
Scores on the aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination (or the 
Graduate Management Admission Test), and an appropriate advanced test if 
required by the department, should be sent directly to the Office of Graduate 
Programs. In order for these scores to be available at the time when admission 
decisions are normally made, applicants are encouraged to take the GRE by 
December of the year prior to that for which application is being made. The general 
application deadline for the following academic year is February 1 . However, 
some departments specify an earlier deadline, and departments may occasionally 
be able to consider late applications. Therefore, specific inquiries should be 
directed to the department. 

Candidates are evaluated on their previous academic records, available test 
scores, and letters of reference from scholars under whom they have studied. 
Additional evidence of qualification to pursue advanced study, such as writing 
samples, portfolios, or statements of purpose, may be required. In addition to any 
specific requirements of the department, the applicant is expected to have at least a 
"B" (3.0) average in undergraduate work and high scores on the Graduate Record 
Examination (or GMAT). Initial decisions regarding admission or denial are made 
by departmental committees, which send recommendations accordingly to the 
Office of Graduate Programs for review. Official offers of admission may be made 
only by the Provost. 

Graduate programs at Rice are designed for full-time study, but a limited 
number of students may be admitted on a part-time basis if the department 
recommends making such an exception, and if the Provost approves. 

Each graduate student is advised by the departmental chair or an officially 
designated faculty member in planning the initial semester of graduate study. As 
soon as possible, each student should affiliate with a faculty advisor who will help 
plan both the course program and the thesis or special report. 



1 34 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Academic Regulations 

Residency. The minimum residency (i.e., period of full-time study at Rice) is 
one semester for the M.A. or M.S., and four semesters for the doctorate. 

Leave of Absence. Leave of absence is granted only by the Graduate Office 
upon the recommendation of the department, and is granted only to graduate 
students in good standing with the University. Leave must be approved in advance 
of the academic semester in question; it will not be granted after the student has 
registered for courses or after the registration period has passed. Normally, leave of 
absence is granted for no more than two consecutive semesters. No work toward a 
degree may be done at Rice or involve Rice faculty (or facilities) during a leave of 
absence. 

Minimum Registration. Except for Degree 798 ("Degree Candidates Only"), 
registration in the final semester when all requirements have been completed 
earlier, the minimum number of hours for which a student may register is three. 

Courses of Study. Graduate students may register for courses of study only 
with the approval of their departmental advisors or chair. Similarly, students are 
allowed to drop or add courses only if departmental approval has been given. 

Full-time Status. Graduate programs at Rice generally require full-time study. 
The semester course load for full-time students is nine hours or more, as required 
by the department. Full-time students may accept other employment only with the 
approval of the department and the Graduate Office. Students who are employed 
elsewhere in a full-time or virtually full-time capacity are not normally eligible for 
full-time status at Rice. 

Part-time Study. Part-time students are occasionally admitted by special 
permission, usually for non-thesis programs only. Departmental recommendation 
is required. Students enrolling for nine semester hours or more will be considered 
full-time, and full-time tuition will apply. 

Pass/Fail Option. Graduate students may take courses on the pass/fail basis 
only with departmental approval. All other restrictions regarding the pass/fail 
option, as stated on page 85, apply equally to graduate students. Class III students 
may not take courses pass/fail. 

Grade Standards. Students must achieve at least a B- (2.67) average on the 
courses counted toward a graduate degree. This is a minimal requirement; some 
departments have more stringent standards. Grade point averages are computed 
as shown in the undergraduate section of this catalog, on page 87. 

Probationary Status. A graduate student is considered to be on probationary 
status whenever the cumulative GPA, or the GPA for one semester, falls below 
2.33. Some departments may have more stringent standards. In most cases, the 
student's department will send the student a letter of warning. However, the 
probationary status applies whether or not such a letter has been issued. A second 
semester of probationary status will lead to dismissal by the Graduate Office unless 
a plea for exception is presented by the student's department and approved by the 
Graduate Council. A student may be dismissed by departmental action after only 
one semester of performance at the probationary level. (For other causes, see 
below.) 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 135 

Dismissal. A graduate student may be dismissed from a program cither for 
reasons of unsatisfactory progress or for reasons of behavior judged by the Univer- 
sity to be disruptive or otherwise contrary to the best interest of either the 
University or the student. 

Calendar Deadlines. Graduate students are expected to observe deadlines, 
such as for adding and dropping courses, as stated in the academic calendar. 

Continuous Enrollment, Readmission. Graduate students are expected to 
maintain continuous involvement and enrollment, unless official leave of absence 
has been granted. Failure to register for any period without a leave of absence 
granted by the Provost constitutes a de facto withdrawal. If the student later wishes 
to resume study, reapplication is required. Readmission is given only on the 
recommendation of the department and the approval of the Provost. A readmis- 
sion fee of $ 1 00 is charged. 

Departmental Service. In most research degree programs, graduate students 
are assigned a limited amount of teaching or other departmental service as part of 
their training. The assignment should not entail more than ten hours per week, 
averaged over the semester, and will not be required for more than eight semesters. 

Approval of Candidacy. A student seeking a master's or doctoral degree must 
submit a petition through the departmental chair to the Provost. The chair must 
certify that the applicant has fulfilled the departmental requirements and provide 
a transcript or other evidence that the work within the department is of high 
quality. The final oral examination in defense of thesis can be given only after the 
candidacy has been approved by the Provost. Applications for approval of candi- 
dacy for the doctoral degree must be filed in the Office of Graduate Programs prior 
to November 1 and for the master's degree prior to March 1 ofthe academic year in 
which graduation is expected. The approval is valid for two years for the master's 
degree and four years for the doctoral degree. A student must have been approved 
for candidacy for the doctoral degree before the beginning ofthe ninth semester of 
residency at Rice to be eligible for continued financial support. 

Oral Examinations, Thesis Committees. A committee for the oral examina- 
tion, known as the thesis committee, is approved by the Provost at the time 
candidacy is approved. A thesis committee is composed of at least three members, 
of which two, including the committee chair, must be members ofthe department. 
In the case of a doctoral committee one member must be from another depart- 
ment. At least three members, including the chair, must be tenured or tenure-track 
members ofthe Rice faculty. The committee chair need not be the thesis director, 
but must be tenured or a tenure-track member ofthe major department. 

Candidates are responsible for informing the members of their committee of 
the nature ofthe research and its progress; the members ofthe committee should 
review and approve the thesis in preliminary form before March 1 5 in order for the 
candidate to be eligible to receive the degree in the May commencement. The oral 
examination may be scheduled at any time after the approval of candidacy, prior 
to the beginning of examination week in either semester. For the doctoral degree, 
the examination must be announced in the University Calendar at least one week 
in advance. In appropriate circumstances, an oral examination for the Ph.D. may 
be scheduled during the summer, and the posting of notice ofthe time and place on 
the bulletin board of Fondren Library the preceding week is acceptable as the 
public announcement. For the master's degree, public notice ofthe oral examina- 
tion should be posted on the departmental bulletin board one week in advance. 



1 36 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The length of the examination and the character of the subject matter on 
which the candidate will be examined are left to the judgment of the committee. 
Should the candidate fail, the chair may schedule a second examination. In the 
event of a second failure, the student is required to withdraw from the University. 
Following the successful passing of the oral examination in defense of the thesis, 
two copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Programs no 
later than one year from the date of the examination. 

Students who pass the oral examination in defense of thesis on or before the 
first day of classes of the fall semester do not have to register for that semester even 
though work on the final copy may be continuing. They must register for Degree 
798 in the spring in order to receive the degree. 

Thesis Regulations and Procedures, The thesis, which is the principal record of 
work for an advanced degree, will be permanently preserved in the library. 
Directions for standard thesis form, which must be followed in detail, are provided 
by the Office of Graduate Programs upon approval of candidacy. Students submit- 
ting a dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Architecture, or Doctor 
of Musical Arts degree must fill out a Survey of Earned Doctorates form. All 
students submitting theses, whether for master's or doctoral degrees, must com- 
plete a University Microfilm contract. Fees for the microfilming and binding of the 
thesis are to be paid to the cashier prior to submission of the two copies for 
approval. The deadline for submission of the thesis to the Office of Graduate 
Programs is noon of the next-to-the-last Friday preceding commencement. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



Tuition and fees for graduate students given here are for academic year 1988- 
89 only and are subject to change in subsequent years as the operating expenses of 
the University change. 

Tuition for full-time students enrolled in the graduate division is $5,300 per 
year ($2,650 per semester) for all students through four or six semesters, as 
indicated below. In addition, each full-time graduate student pays a health service 
fee of $ 1 23.20 per year ($6 1 .60 per semester), a Graduate Student Association fee 
of $10 ($5 per semester) and an Honor Council fee of $1. After six semesters, 
students continuing any phase of their studies, including work on their disserta- 
tion, on or off campus, must be registered and are subject to a tuition fee of $300 
per year ($ 1 50 per semester). Students who are admitted with a relevant master's 
degree enter the reduced-tuition category after four semesters. 

Refer to page 99 for a discussion of health insurance charges. 

Continuous involvement and enrollment are expected. Failure to register for 
any period without a leave of absence granted by the Graduate Council constitutes 
withdrawal. A reinstatement fee of $25 is required upon return after an official 
leave of absence. A readmission fee of $ 100, plus payment of the tuition for up to 
two missed semesters, is required upon readmission after previous withdrawal or 
failure to maintain active registration. 

The fee for the preceptorship programs in architecture, music, engineering, 
etc., which involve approved supervised work off campus to be recorded on the 
student transcript, is $ 1 00 per semester. Full-time interns at the Rice Center or an 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 1 37 

approved alternate pay $500 per semester. Tuition for part-lime and Class III 
students is $225 per semester hour plus $50 registration fee each semester; total not 
to exceed $2,650 for Class III students. Students taking nine hours or more must be 
considered full-time. No scholarship or fellowship support is available to part-time 
students. 

Graduate students who have fulfilled all requirements for the degree sought, 
including the thesis and/or final public oral examination, not already registered 
under one of the categories above, must be registered in Degree 798, "Require- 
ments complete — registering for degree only" for the spring semester in which the 
degree is awarded. 

For an annual fee of $35, a graduate student may purchase admittance to all 
regularly scheduled athletic events. If married, a student may purchase a season 
ticket for a spouse at a reduced rate of one-half the regular price, provided the 
season ticket is purchased at the beginning of the fall term. 



Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 



Memorial Fellowships, Honors, and Prizes. Provision is made for a variety of 
fellowships, scholarships, and prizes available to graduates of this and other 
universities. Memorial fellowships that have been founded and endowed by gift or 
bequest on the part of friends of Rice University provide stipends enabling the 
holders to devote their time to study and research in their chosen fields. There are 
also several industrial fellowships maintained by companies interested in the 
development of technical fields and the training of competent scientists, engineers, 
and business executives. 

Persons desiring consideration for appointment as fellows should consult 
with the department in which they desire to do research. However, not all fellow- 
ships are available every year. 

A partial list of graduate scholarships, fellowships, and awards includes: 
Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS Foundation) Scholarships in 

Science and Engineering 
Ora N. Arnold Fellowship for better understanding between people and govern- 
ments of the United States and those of Mexico, the South American states, 

the West Indies, and the Philippine Islands 
Nettie S. Autrey Memorial Fellowship in Science 
Eleanor and Mills Bennett Fellowships in Hydrology 
Ralph Budd Award for Research in Engineering 
Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship in Economics 
Robert L. Chuoke Award in Physics 
Cities Service Research Fellowship in Geology 
Continental Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 
William Dunlap Darden Medal in Architecture 
Environmental Protection Agency Fellowships in Environmental Science and 

Engineering 
W. Maurice Ewing Fellowship in Marine Science 
Exxon Fellowship in Geology 
John W. Gardner Award in Humanities and Social Sciences 



1 38 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Louis J. Girard Foundation Fellowship for Opthalmic Research 

William and Elva Gordon Scholarship in Space Physics and Astronomy 

Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowships 

Gulf Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 

Karl F. Hasselmann Fellowship in Chemical Engineering 

Marjory Meyer Hasselmann Fellowship in Chemistry 

Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Fellowship in Applied Physical Sciences 

Houston Gem and Mineral Society Fellowship in Geology 

Houston Geological Society Outstanding Student Award 

Houston Oil and Minerals Corporation Fellowship in Geology 

Jameson Fellowship for American Decorative Arts 

Captain Charles Septimus Longcope Awards in History 

Edgar Odell Lovett Fellowships in Mathematics 

Jermayne MacAgy Fellowships in Art History 

Mrs. L. F. McCollum Fellowship 

John W. Mecom Fellowship in Geology 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship in German 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship in Linguistics 

William F. Marlar Scholarship in Space Science 

National Institute of Health Fellowships 

National Institute of Health Traineeships in Biology 

National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships 

Pennzoil Company Fellowship in Geology 

Petroleum Research Fund Fellowships of the American Chemical Society 

Phillips Petroleum Company Fellowship in Chemistry 

Zevi W. Salsburg Awards in Chemistry 

Schlumberger Foundation Fellowship in Mathematics 

Shell Fellowship in Physics 

Robert Parker Shubinski Award in Civil Engineering 

Sigma Xi Research Awards 

John Stauffer Scholarship in Chemistry 

Tenneco Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 

Texaco Fellowship in Physics 

Radoslav A. Tsanoff Fellowship in Philosophy 

Richard B. Turner Memorial Awards in Chemistry 

Union Oil of California Fellowship in Geology 

Lodieska Stockbridge Vaughan Fellowship 

Harry Weiser Awards in Chemistry 

Wiess Fellowship in Geology 

Robert A. Welch Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships 

H. A. Wilson Award in Physics 

Wray-Todd Fellowships in Natural Sciences 



Scholarships and Prizes of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of 
Administration 

Leo M. Acker Memorial Scholarship in Accounting 
J. Kenneth S. Arthur Scholarship 
Alice Pratt Brown Scholarship 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 1 39 

Dean's Award for Academic Excellence 

COMIT Scholarship in Management Information Systems 

John J. Deering Loan Fund 

Deloitte Haskins & Sells Award for Excellence in Accounting 

Educational Foundation of Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants 

Excellence Award 
Entrepreneurship Prize for the Best Acquisition Proposal 
Entrepreneurship Prize for the Best Business Plan 
Executive Development Loan Fund 
David E. Farnsworth Scholarship 

Financial Executives Institute Award in Administrative Science 
E.F. "Gene" Rorian Scholarship in Administrative Science 
Bernard Fuchs Scholarship 
H.H. Galloway Award in Administrative Science 
Jones Scholars 

William H. and Marion F. Keenan Fellowships 

Cooper M. and Zava Waldrop Lochridge Scholarship in Administrative Science 
Speros P. Martel Loan Fund 
John T. McCants Scholarship in Accounting 
Midtown Business Network Award 
Vernon F. "Doc" Neuhaus, Sr., Scholarship 
Pannel Kerr Forster Award for Excellence in Taxation 
Lorane T. Phillips Award for Excellence in Writing 
Robert E. Phillips Award for Excellence in Oral Presentation 
Rice Presidential Recognition Award 
Rotan Mosle Loan Fund 
Verne F. Simons Scholarship in Accounting 
Wall Street Journal Achievement Award 
M. A. "Mike" Wright Award 

Scholarships and Prizes of the Shepherd School of Music. See listing in the 
undergraduate section, page 1 14. 

Rice Graduate Fellowships. Graduate students with high academic records 
and outstanding qualifications may receive assistance through awards of Rice 
University Fellowships. These appointments in most cases provide a stipend plus 
tuition for the nine-month academic period. Some research assistant positions or 
special fellowships may be available to provide support during the summer 
months. Appointees to any fellowship or research assistantship must be engaged in 
full-time graduate study. Particularly outstanding entering students may be nomi- 
nated by their department for a Rice Presidential Fellowship or a Rice Presidential 
Recognition Award. Selections are made by the Graduate Council. 

In some departments. Rice Teaching Assistantships may be available to 
qualified advanced (third- or fourth-year) students. If exceptional teaching ability 
has been demonstrated, a student may be appointed to a Teaching Associateship. 

Eligibility for fellowship support is limited to five years of study for students 
seeking a doctorate or three years for students seeking a master's degree. However, 
in order to maintain eligibility in the fifth year, the student must have achieved 
candidacy. Doctoral students entering with a previously earned master's degree 
will be eligible for stipend support for a maximum of four years of study and must 
have achieved candidacy by the beginning of the fourth year. 



1 40 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduate Tuition Scholarships. Students whose previous records show 
marked promise but for whom no graduate fellowships are available may, especial- 
ly in their first year of graduate study, be awarded full or partial graduate tuition 
scholarships without stipend. Graduate scholars must carry a full schedule of 
graduate work. 

Scholarships which provide both tuition and stipends are also available for a 
limited number of graduate students who are participants in the Army or Navy 
ROTC programs. For information on these scholarships, contact the Departments 
of Military or Naval Science. 



Financial Aid 



A limited number of tuition grants based on financial need are available. Rice 
engineering students who have received financial aid from the University during 
their undergraduate years may apply for continuation of assistance as needed for 
the year of study for the professional master's degree. 

The Office of Financial Aid at Rice University offers limited aid to graduate 
students in the form of loans and work to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and 
refugees. 

Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL) may be processed through Rice up to a 
maximum eligibility of $7,500 per annum. These are guaranteed by the State of 
Texas. Eligibility criteria are set by Rice University and the Texas Guaranteed 
Student Loan Corporation. 

No interest accrues nor is payment required while a student is enrolled at least 
half-time at Rice or full-time in any eligible post-secondary institution or for six 
months after terminating attendance. Repayment begins after this period, includ- 
ing a 7 to 9 percent annual interest charge on the unpaid principal balance. 
Depending on the size of the total loan commitment, the repayment period may 
extend over as much as 1 years. A completed GSL application, with supplements 
and 1040s must be submitted to the Rice Financial Aid Office. 

CAVEAT: If the student has prior undergraduate GSLs, it would be in his best 
interest to obtain additional loans from the same source. Deferment forms should 
be filed with the holders of undergraduate loans. This applies to those who are Rice 
graduates as well as students from other schools. 

Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) are available to graduate students. 
They may borrow up to $4,000 per annum to an aggregate of $20,000. The interest 
rate on SLS loans is a maximum of 1 2 percent per year on the unpaid balance of the 
loans. Ordinarily the first payment is due within 60 days of the date of disburse- 
ment. However, graduate students may defer payment of principal and interest 
until termination of enrollment. 

A completed SLS application, with supplements, must be submitted to the 
Rice Financial Aid Office. 

All students may work on campus but time is a a major factor. For most, 1 to 
1 2 hours a week is a reasonable limit. College Work/Study is available to students 
who meet eligibility criteria set by the Federal Government. A Financial Aid Form 
(FAF) must be filed with College Scholarship Service (CSS), and earnings will be 
limited to the amount shown on the award letter. 



GRADUATE STUDENT LIFE 1 4 1 

Fellowship and scholarship recipients are selected by the individual depart- 
ments, subject to the approval of the Office of Graduate Programs. Applications 
for such awards should be made directly to the department involved. 

A Gulf Oil Corporation Foundation Loan Fund and the Benjamin S. Lindsey 
and Vesla Nobile Lindsey Memorial Loan Fund are also available to students who 
are working toward a degree to assist them in meeting educational expenses. The 
funds of this loan program are limited. Interested persons may contact the Finan- 
cial Aid Office. Interested students wishing to apply for a loan under any of these 
loan programs should commence application procedures the summer prior to the 
academic year for which they are seeking assistance. Detailed information and 
application forms are available in the Financial Aid Office. 

An Emergency Loan Fund, originally provided through gifts from the Gradu- 
ate Wives Club of 1 972-73, the Graduate Student Association, and various faculty 
members, is available to help graduate students at Rice with short-term needs. 
Loans from this fund are limited to $ 1 50 and must be repaid within three months. 
In lieu of interest, a charge of $ 1 per $50 loaned is assessed to maintain the fund. 



Graduate Student Life 



Graduate Student Responsibility 

Rice University encourages student self-discipline within the framework of its 
general objectives. Each member of the community is expected to govern his or her 
conduct by standards of good taste and ethical judgment and to exercise personal 
responsibility. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any students 
whose failure to accept responsibilities as evidenced by conduct or their scholastic 
achievements is considered detrimental to their own or the University's best 
interests. 



The Honor System 

Graduate students are expected to observe the provisions of the honor code. 
The provisions of the honor system are summarized on page 117. 



Fondren Library 

With a collection approaching 1 .4 million volumes, 1 .8 million microforms, 
and 12,500 current periodical and other serial titles, the Fondren Library is 
strongly committed to supporting the research and information needs of Rice's 
students and faculty and it provides extensive resources for advanced study and 
research. Among the notable research collections are the Menil Collection in art 
and art history, the Nadler German language and literature collection, as well as 
strong collections in Austrian history, architecture, engineering, American histo- 
ry, French literature, and the natural sciences. Bibliographic access is provided 
through LIBRIS, the Fondren's automated catalog. 



1 42 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The library is also a depository for United States Government documents and 
for United States patents, as well as a University affiliate for the U.S. Census data. 
The Woodson Research Center is the respository of the library's rare books, 
manuscripts, and University archives. Special collections, including Civil War 
imprints, Texana, eighteenth-century English drama, the papers and scientific 
library of Sir Julian Huxley, the Anderson Collection on the History of Aeronau- 
tics, as well as numerous literary and historical manuscript holdings are available 
for research at the center. Large microform sets of research materials such as Early 
American Imprints, papers of a number of United States presidents, and newspa- 
pers are also available. 

The Fondren's open shelf policy enables patrons to locate materials easily. 
The reference/collection development librarians provide assistance in the use of 
library materials and in computer searches of over four hundred subject data 
bases. Special facilities such as individual study carrels, group study rooms, audio- 
visual facilities, microform reading carrels, word processing, and photodupli- 
cating equipment are also available in the library. 



Graduate Student Government and Organizations 

All full-time graduate students are members of the Graduate Student Associa- 
tion, which is the sole organ representing the graduate students as a body. Part- 
time graduate students may become members of the association upon payment of 
the necessary fee. The governing body of this organization is the Graduate Student 
Association Council, consisting of a chairman, a secretary, a treasurer, and a 
representative from each department offering graduate study. Graduate students 
also participate in University affairs through their representatives on many of the 
standing committees appointed by the president, such as the Graduate Council, 
the Research Council, and on various departmental committees as well. 

The Graduate Student Association invites participation by all members in a 
variety of social activities. 



Housing 

The Rice Graduate House is located at the south edge of the campus at the 
comer of South Main and University. The facility offers rooms, either private or 
shared, community kitchens, a commons and meeting rooms, and free transporta- 
tion to academic buildings. Graduate students may also apply for membership in 
the undergraduate residential colleges. Rooms and apartments are often available 
for rent within walking or bicycling distance of the campus. The Office of Student 
Advising Activities and the Student Association keep a record of rooms and 
apartments about which they have been notified, and the daily newspapers list still 
others. Incoming graduate students are advised to arrive in Houston several days 
early in order to find housing. Rooms in the Graduate House must be reserved on a 
space-available basis by July 1 5 for the fall semester. 



GRADUATE STUDENT LIFE 1 43 

The Student Health Service and Insurance 

Graduate students pay the same health service fee as undergraduates. A 
primary care outpatient clinic, open weekdays through the undergraduate school 
year, is located on campus in Hanszen College. After clinic hours, medical care is 
available at Park Plaza Hospital emergency room and through the doctors at Park 
Plaza Hospital. Access to limited psychiatric consultation, including marriage 
counseling, is also available to graduate students through the Rice Counseling and 
Psychiatric Service. For more information, refer to page 1 20- 121. 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance may be 
purchased through the University at two levels of coverage, described in a bro- 
chure that is available in the Cashier's Office and the Office of Student Adivising 
and Activities. Rice's group coverage will be effective from 1 2:0 1 a.m., August 1 5, 
1987, until 12:01 a.m. August 15, 1988. Dependent coverage is also available. If a 
student has other medical insurance, a waiver card showing proof of insurance 
must be signed and returned to the Cashier's Office by August 1 5, prior to the 
beginning of classes, to avoid automatic billing for coverage. 



Student Automobiles 

All automobiles on campus must be registered with the Rice University Police 
Department. For more information, refer to page 1 24. 




^ 




1 



Courses of 
Instruction 



Academic departments are listed in this section alphabetically (except for the 
engineering departments, which are grouped together), with complete lists and 
descriptions of courses. Most departments also give specific requirements for 
students both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. These statements are 
supplemental to the University degree requirements described on pages 62-82. 

Courses numbered below 300 are lower level or introductory courses. Those 
numbered 300 to 499 are designated as advanced courses. Advanced courses are 
open to first-year and second-year students with proper prerequisites and to 
graduate students on approval of the individual student's adviser. Courses de- 
signed for graduate students are numbered 500 and above. The methods of 
presentation and quality of work expected make them generally unsuited to 
undergraduate participation. Undergraduates are permitted to enroll in graduate- 
level courses only after consultation with their advisers and with the instructor of 
the course. 

Figures in parentheses following the title of each course signify the number of 
class hours per week, the number of laboratory hours per week, and the credit in 
semester hours for the completed course, in that order. The letters "a," "b," and 
"c" following the course number indicate the semester in which the course is 
normally taught. Thus, History 201a is normally taught in the fall semester and 
History 202b in the spring semester. Biochemistry 400c is normally taught in the 
summer session. The notation "a,b" indicates a course that is normally offered 
both semesters, while "a/b" indicates a course which may be offered either in the 
fall or spring semester depending upon the demand. 

Certain courses are dependent upon available faculty, student demand, or 
funding. Uncertainty about when or whether a particular course will be offered 
during 1988-89 is indicated by the designation "Not offered every year." 

Course descriptions in this section illustrate topics within the subject matter 
of the courses. Topics actually covered in the courses may vary from the examples 
given. Courses are subject to cancellation or modification, but cancellation of a 
course after final enrollment occurs only in extreme circumstances. 

Students may obtain more detailed information about courses from the 
Registrar's Schedule of Courses Offered puhMshed each year or from the instructor 
of the course. 

Persons using this catalog to evaluate Rice University transcripts should refer 
to course titles and descriptions, rather than course numbers, to determine content 
because course numbers are occasionally changed. 



1 46 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Accounting and 
Administrative Science 



The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 
of Administration 



Professor Bailor, Dean 

Professors P.W. Bell, Bixby, Bryant, J. Cooper, Dipboye, Glanville, Howell, R.N. 

Taylor, Tuggle, Uecker, von der Mehden, E.E. Williams, and Zeff 

Adjunct Professors Blumberg and R.J. Stanton 

Associate Professors Batsell, Dharan, Driskill, Kiepper, Napier, W. M. Taylor, 

and Windsor 
Adjunct Associate Professors Hatchett, Hewitt, Isgur, Loukissas, Moseley, and 

Rosborough 

Visiting Associate Professor Blair 

Assistant Professors Bridges and W.R. Wilson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Flatt 

Visiting Assistant Professor Bougen 

Lecturers L. Baker, Ellis, Friday, Gow, Hassett, Hauser, Leffel, McQuilkin, 

Mandel, D. Ross, Viebig, and Westheimer 

Adjunct Lecturer McCormick 

Degrees Offered: Master of Business Administration; Master of Accounting; 
Ph.D. in Accounting 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration was established in 
1 974 through a gift from Houston Endowment Inc. InterdiscipHnary in nature, the 
school utilizes faculty of other university departments to augment its own still 
expanding faculty. The school is dedicated to providing unique educational oppor- 
tunities for professional training in the fields of accounting, business administra- 
tion, or public and nonprofit management for highly select graduate students. The 
curricula leading to the degrees of Master of Business Administration (which 
includes a concentration in public and nonprofit management) and Master of 
Accounting are designed to be distinctive in terms of scope, realism, and utility. 
The school also offers a Doctor of Philosophy in Accounting, in which students 
undertake highly individualized research studies under the direction of distin- 
guished scholars. (Ph.D. applications are not being accepted in 1 988-89). Finan- 
cial aid is available for both master's and doctoral degree students. 

Undergraduate Program. No undergraduate major is offered in the Jones 
Graduate School; however, such undergraduate courses as accounting may be used 
to fulfill major requirements in the interdisciplinary program in managerial 
studies. This degree program is described on page 346. 

Students admitted to the Honors Program in Managerial Studies may elect 
certain specified graduate courses in accounting and administrative science as part 
of their major requirements. In addition, the undergraduate major in managerial 
studies for Rice students admitted as seniors to the Jones Graduate School in the 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 47 

special "five-year plan" may be partly satisfied by course work taken for the 
master's degree. 

Graduate Programs. The Jones Graduate School of Administration offers the 
Master of Business Administration and Master of Accounting degrees and the 
Doctor of Philosophy in Accounting. Applicants to these programs must submit 
recent scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), all official 
college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. Unless they received an 
undergraduate degree from a U.S. college or university, foreign nationals whose 
native language is not English must submit recent scores on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Application forms are available from and should be 
submitted to the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs, Jesse H. Jones Gradu- 
ate School of Administration, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 
77251. Graduates from any accredited university and from a broad range of 
undergraduate majors are considered for either professional program. Students 
enrolled in the Jones Graduate School represent a wide variety of undergraduate 
majors, including economics, managerial studies, mathematics, mathematical 
sciences, political science, history, languages, fine arts, natural sciences, engineer- 
ing, and business administration. An accelerated "five-year" degree plan is availa- 
ble to exceptional Rice students in which they may complete the master's degree by 
the end of five years of college study. Admission to the Jones Graduate School is 
highly selective and limited to those who have performed with distinction in their 
previous academic work and on the GMAT. 

Undergraduates contemplating graduate work in accounting or administra- 
tive science are encouraged to take course work in principles of accounting, 
principles of microeconomics, and business data processing. College mathematics 
through calculus is helpful. However, no specific undergraduate course work is 
required for admission. 

A minimum cumulative average of 3.0 (B) is required for graduation. This 
requirement applies to Jones Graduate School courses and to any other Rice 
University courses taken for the M.B.A. or Master of Accounting degrees. All 
courses taken for the degree (including courses taken outside the Jones Graduate 
School) will be counted in the GPA calculation. 

Grades lower than C are not acceptable for credit towards graduation. Any 
time a student receives a grade lower than C, the course must be repeated if it is 
required for graduation. If a grade lower than C is received in an elective course, 
the specific course need not be repeated, but the credits must be made up. 

A student with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher is eligible to continue in the 
school and is eligible for graduation and for financial aid from Jones School 
sources. A student with a cumulative GPA lower than 3.0 will be placed on 
probation and may have financial aid terminated. A student will return to good 
academic standing, but will not necessarily receive financial aid, by achieving a 
cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. 

A student is subject to academic dismissal if: ( 1 ) after attempted completion of 
at least 1 2, but fewer than 24 hours, the student's cumulative grade point average is 
below 2.90; (2) after attempted completion of at least 24 hours, but fewer than 40 
hours, the student's cumulative grade point average is below 2.95; (3) after 
attempted completion of at least 40 hours, the student's cumulative grade point 
average is below 3.0 or the student attains a semester average of below 3.0 while on 
probation. 



1 48 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Any student who has completed 64 approved hours for the M.B.A. or 33 for 
the Master of Accounting degree, but has a cumulative average lower than 3.0, will 
not be permitted to graduate. Such students may, at the school's sole discretion, be 
permitted to complete additional approved course work in the subsequent 12 
months in an effort to raise the cumulative average to 3.0. Students in this situation 
are also subject to academic suspension or dismissal. 

A student who continues on probation in consecutive semesters is not eligible 
for scholarship support from the Jones Graduate School unless his or her most 
recent grade point average for the immediately preceding semester is 3.0 or above. 
Students who have been suspended may not be eligible for financial aid from Jones 
Graduate School sources upon their return to school. 

In addition, students are expected at all times to maintain high standards of 
ethical and professional conduct. They are treated as professional colleagues and 
are expected to behave accordingly. Failure to maintain such standards is grounds 
for disciplinary action, including dismissal. 

Financial assistance by the Jones Graduate School is awarded only for a given 
semester or year. Continuation of assistance depends on satisfactory academic 
performance, professional behavior, and availability of funds. 

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) The M.B.A. program seeks to 
prepare students for high-level management positions in business, government, 
and nonprofit organizations. 

Completion of the M.B.A. degree requires a minimum of two academic years 
in residence at Rice and 64 credit hours. One year of this residence requirement 
may be completed prior to receipt of the bachelor's degree through the accelerated 
"five-year" plan for Rice undergraduates. No student can receive a Rice graduate 
degree without first or simultaneously receiving a baccalaureate degree from his or 
her undergraduate institution. 

The M.B.A. student must register for no fewer than 1 5 and no more than 1 7 
credit hours. Any other registration requires special permission. All registration 
and drop/add forms require the signature of an adviser. All courses must be 
approved by the Jones Graduate School. Requirements are stated annually for 
each entering class. 

Waivers, exemptions, and transfers of credit are solely the decision of the 
school. Required courses may be waived in exceptional cases where the student 
already has the equivalent preparation. The residence requirement is not neces- 
sarily reduced, but additional elective courses are made available. 

The first year of the full-time program is completely required and consists of 
foundation courses including accounting, communications and computers, .eco- 
nomics and marketing, finance, legal and governmental processes, organizational 
theory, and quantitative methods. The student must complete Administration 
501, 502, 511, 531, 532, 541, 542, 561, 562; and Accounting 501, 502, 524. 
Courses in the first year serve as prerequisites for the second year required and 
elective courses. Prerequisite requirements are enforced. Exceptions are granted 
only upon written petition to the Curriculum and Standards Committee which 
advises the dean; the dean's decision must be appealed to the Graduate Council. 
Oral and written communications skills are emphasized in both years. 

The second year features two case method courses on management strategy 
designed to integrate the foundations skills taught in the first year. The student 
must complete Administration 503, 504, 591, and 592, together with 24 credit 
hours of approved electives. Each student is required to complete at least one area 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 49 

of concentration consisting of no fewer than 1 2 hours of elective courses. No credit 
hour may be counted toward more than one concentration; no more than two 
concentrations may be declared. With the assistance of an adviser, each student 
selects courses to meet the student's goals and objectives. Most courses will be in 
administrative science or accounting, but they may also include graduate or upper 
level offerings in other departments. Concentrations are available in accounting, 
business entrepreneurship, finance, international management, management in- 
formation systems, marketing, and public and nonprofit management. Course 
work in operations research is available through the Department of Mathematical 
Sciences for qualified students. Any other concentration requires a petition to the 
Associate Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs. 

The international management program offers a set of elective courses in the 
political, economic, and legal aspects of multinational activities. Students ordi- 
narily take Administration 571 , 573, and 574. Students may take related courses in 
other departments. The international management program is particularly rele- 
vant for students with a strong background in foreign languages and cultures. 
Students lacking such a background are strongly advised to take additional time 
(including summers and possibly a third year) to acquire such skills. Language 
training does not qualify for graduate credit toward the M.B.A. degree. 

The Jones Graduate School offers an area of concentration in public and 
nonprofit management. Students who wish to prepare for government or nonprofit 
service select, with the assistance of an adviser, a set of elective courses tailored to 
meet the student's career aims. Students may take related courses in other depart- 
ments. The M.B.A. core curriculum is specifically designed to promote the transfer 
of management skills from the private to the public and nonprofit sectors. Students 
interested in business entrepreneurship ordinarily take no more than two of 
Administration 521, 522, or 525 together with related courses. 

Master of Accounting (M.Acco.) The Master of Accounting program prepares 
students for professional positions in public accounting as well as for a variety of 
senior financial positions in business and government. 

Rice undergraduates may complete the Master of Accounting program in one 
year of graduate study if they have taken the following prerequisite courses by the 
end of their senior year: Accounting 305, 411, and either 406 or 409; Economics 
2 1 1 , 2 1 2, and 370; Mathematical Sciences 376 and either Statistics 280 or Psychol- 
ogy 339; and Political Science 309 and 310. Additional recommended, but not 
required, courses are Statistics 38 1 and 480; Economics 375 and 448; and Psychol- 
ogy 1 1 and 23 1 . No specific undergraduate major is required for entrance into the 
program. 

The Master of Accounting degree program requires a minimum of 33 semester 
hours, including the following courses: Accounting 502, 512, 513, 524, 527, 531, 
and 541; and Administration 501, 502, and 511. Completion of the program 
qualifies the student to take the Uniform CPA Examination (30 accounting hours 
in Texas). 

Rice graduates and graduates from other universities, who have not satisfied 
the prerequisite courses, may require two years (62 semester hours) to complete the 
program. 

All courses must be approved by the Jones Graduate School. Required courses 
may be waived in exceptional cases where the student already has the equivalent 
preparation. Waivers, exemptions, or transfers of credit are solely the decision of 
the school. The residence requirement is not necessarily reduced, but additional 



1 50 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

elective courses are made available. Requirements are stated annually for each 
entering class. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Accounting. The Ph.D. program prepares candidates 
for teaching and research careers in accounting. The program, which emphasizes 
research, normally requires a minimum of three years of full-time residence work 
(two years of course work and one year of dissertation research and writing). A 
bachelor's degree is required for entry. 

After a year of course work, a doctoral student must satisfactorily complete a 
research paper before continuing. The student must also successfully complete a 
comprehensive examination prior to undertaking dissertation research and writ- 
ing. The student will be expected to undertake certain research and instructional 
obligations as part of the Ph.D. program. 

Applications are not being accepted in 1 988-89. 



Accounting 

Accounting Courses 

305a,b. Introduction to Accounting (3-0-3). 

Survey of basic accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems 
of asset valuation and income determination. In addition to preregistration, students must 
sign a reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. Enrollment is limited in each section. 

406b. Management Accounting (3-0-3). 

Uses of accounting data to plan and evaluate long-run investment and financing 
decisions and short-run price, costing, output, and financing decisions of the business firm or 
public entity. In addition to preregistration, students must sign a reservation list in 250 
Herring Hall. Prerequisites: Accounting 305, Economics 211. 

409a. Corporate Financial Reporting (3-0-3). 

Using a case and readings format, the course deals with controversial issues in financial 
accounting and the analysis and interpretation of companies' financial statements. In 
addition to preregistration, students must sign a reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 305. 

411a. Asset Accounting (3-0-3). 

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the 
context of accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors 
which have shaped the extant standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. In 
addition to preregistration, students must sign a reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 305. 

497a. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by 
special permission. 

498b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 
See Accounting 497. 

501a. Financial Accounting (3-0-3). 

Introduction to accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems 
of asset valuation and income determination. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 5 1 

502b. Managerial Accounting (3-0-3). ,. 

Introduction to accounting systems designed to facilitate internal decision-making 
evaluation and control by private and public organizations. Particular emphasis is given to 
behavioral impact of alternative internal reporting schemes. Prerequisite: Accounting 501 
and graduate standing. 

511a. Asset Accounting (3-0-3). . .u 

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the 
context of accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors 
which have shaped the extant standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. Prerequi- 
site: Accounting 501. 

512b. Equity Accounting (3-0-3). r. u, ^ . ^u^A ' 

Deals with the particular problems in the estimation of liabilities and stockholders 
equity. The focus is both on accounting theory and on the financial, economic, and political 
factors that have shaped the extant standards. Prerequisite: Accounting 501 . 

513b. Special Topics in Accounting (3-0-3). . . ,. u 

Deals with the theoretical and technical problems of consolidations, branch accounting, 
interim reporting, foreign operations, and international accounting standards. Also in- 
troduces accounting for government and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: Accounting 
511,512. 

524b. Managerial Accounting and Finance (3-0-3). 

Relationship between economic and current value accounting concepts ot income 
investment and financing decisions and their social consequences, and the framework of 
national economic accounts. Emphasis is on capital budgeting and financial theory. Prereq- 
uisites: Accounting 501, Administration 531, 541. 

525a. Competitive Use of Information Technology (3-0-3). 

This course examines the use of information technology in competitive strategy. 
Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

527a. Management Information Systems (3-0-3). 

Managerial needs and problems in use of information systems; business models, 
equipment selection, information systems management, and systems development. A se- 
mester project is required. Prerequisite: Accounting 501. 

528b. Management of Information Systems and Technology Function (3^0-3). 

Concepts related to systems analysis, design, development, and implementation. Intor- 
mation needs for management and decision support systems are stressed. A semester project 
is required. Prerequisite: Accounting 501. 

529b. Decision Support Systems (3-0-3). 

Problems and approaches associated with designing decision support systems and 
integrating them into an organization's information system. Prerequisite: Accounting 501. 

531a. Federal Taxation of Business Enterprises (4-0-4). 

Theory of United States income taxation and its application to corporations, partner- 
ships, and proprietorships; study of decision models involving tax structure and tax planning 
in business situations. Prerequisite: Accounting 501. 

532b. Federal Taxation of Individuals (3-0-3). . r , a 

United States individual income taxation, including consideration ot tax planning and 
tax-favored retirement plans. Prerequisite: Accounting 531. 



1 52 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

534b. Special Topics in Taxation (Variable). 

An examination of the theory and structure of federal estate and gift taxation, from both 
comphance and tax planning standpoints, and interrelated income tax planning, including 
income taxation of estates and trusts. Prerequisite: Accounting 531. 

541a. Auditing and Financial Reporting (3-0-3). 

Auditing standards and procedures, statistical sampling applications, audit programs 
and reports, and professional ethics associated with the public accounting profession. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 512. 

551a, Financial Accounting Practice (3-0-3). 

Comprehension of FASB pronouncements on valuation, income, and cash flow con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: Accounting 5 1 2. 

552a. Seminar in Accounting Theory (3-0-3). 

Development of accounting theory m historical context, uses of accounting data in the 
decision-making process for managers and outside users, and consequent implications for 
the standard-setting process and public policy. Prerequisite: Accounting 511, 512. Not 
offered every year. 

571b. Issues in International Corporate Reporting and Financial Management 

(3-0-3). 

Uses the tools of economics and corporate finance to offer a conceptual understanding 
of international corporate reporting and financial management. Includes foreign exchange 
spot, forward, and futures transactions; translation of foreign currency financial statements; 
international differences in financial reporting; and performance evaluation of foreign 
operations. Prerequisite: Accounting 501. Not offered in 1988-89. 

597a. Independent Study (Variable). 

Independent study or directed reading on an approved project under faculty supervi- 
sion. Enrollment by special permission. 

598b. Independent Study (Variable). 
See Accounting 597. 

602b. Seminar in Accounting Research I (3-0-3). 

Team-taught in a modular format, this seminar introduces areas of contemporary 
research in accounting. Prerequisite: admission to Ph.D. in accounting program. Not offered 
every year. 

611a. Seminar in Accounting Research II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Accounting 602. Not offered every year. 

612b. Tutorial in Accounting Research (3-0-3). 

Intensive study in an area of accounting research in which the student expects to 
specialize. Prerequisites: Accounting 602, 611. Not offered every year. 

800b. Thesis Research (Variable). 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 53 

Administrative Science 

Administration Courses 

501a. Managerial Skills Seminar I (Variable). 

Periodic Dean's Seminar held each semester in which invited speakers discuss a variety 
of management topics. Basic oral and written communication and management skills for 
first-year M.B.A. and M.Acco. students. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

502b. Managerial Skills Seminar II (Variable). 
See Administration 501. 

503a. Managerial Skills Seminar III (Variable). 

Periodic Dean's Seminar held each semester in which invited speakers discuss a variety 
of management topics. Advanced oral and written communication and management skills 
for second-year M.B.A. and M.Acco. students. Prerequisite: Administration 501 . 

504b. Managerial Skills Seminar IV (Variable). 
See Administration 503. 

505a. Faculty Research Seminar 

Faculty and invited guests meet periodically to present current research findings. 

506b. Faculty Research Seminar 

See Administration 505. 

511a. Organization Theory (3-0-3). 

Exammes theoretical and empirical content of psychology applied in the organizational 
setting, the development of organization theory, current approaches to the study of complex 
organizations, and the operation of major types of complex organizations in both private and 
public sectors. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

518b. Managerial Decision Making (3-0-3). 

Review of current theories of decision making in and by organizations. Emphasis on 
behavioral decision theory, human problem solving, and organizational processes. Prerequi- 
site: graduate standing. 

521a. Entrepreneurship and the New Enterprise (3-0-3). 

Characteristics of entrepreneurs, the economics of entrepreneurship, the role of entre- 
preneurship in economic growth, process of starting and managing a new business, venture 
capital, legal and tax aspects of new venture activities, and preparation of a business plan. 
Prerequisites: Accounting 524, Administration 541. 

522b. Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Exchange (3-0-3). 

How to negotiate, the "needs" approach to buymg and selling a business, enterprise 
valuation, deal and contract structuring, corporate venturing, and special topics. Prerequi- 
sites: Accounting 524, Administration 541. 

523a. Real Estate Finance (3-0-3). 

Examines financing aspects of real estate development. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

524b. Real Estate Investment (3-0-3). 

Identifies and analyzes real estate investment opportunities. Prerequisite: Accounting 

524. 



1 54 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

525a. Creative Entrepreneurship (3-0-3). 

Conceiving ideas for new businesses and evaluating those ideas. Topics include fixed 
and variable costs of new businesses, the break-even point, how to raise capital, and finding 
and motivating employees. Six specific strategies for rapid growth in small- to medium-sized 
businesses are presented. Prerequisites: Accounting 524, Administration 541. 

531a. Quantitative Methods I (3-0-3). 

Use of statistical methods and computer systems to analyze decision problems, includ- 
ing product design as an illustration of marketing management. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing. 

532b. Quantitative Methods II (3-0-3). 

Use of operations research methods and computer systems to analyze decision 
problems, with particular emphasis on production and operations management. Prerequi- 
site: Administration 531. 

534b. Cases in Operations Research (3-0-3). 

Applications of management science optimization techniques through modeling and 
solving of real-world cases involving distribution, financial, production, and manufacturing 
problems. Prerequisite: Administration 531. 

541a. Managerial Economics and Information Systems (3-0-3). 

Long-run and short-run price and production decisions in private and public economic 
entities in the face of differing demand conditions; introduction to computer skills and 
management information systems. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

542b. Managerial Economics and Marketing (3-0-3). 

Marketing strategy and management in domestic and international markets; 
macroeconomics of business cycle fluctuations, fiscal and monetary policy, and internation- 
al trade and finance. Prerequisite: Administration 541. 

543a. Capital Markets (3-0-3). 

Financial environment of the corporation; use of money and capital market instru- 
ments; roles of intermediaries and institutions. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

545b. Investments (3-0-3). 

Investment policy for individuals and institutions, structure of rates in financial 
markets, investment timing and selection, principles of financial analysis of individual 
security issues, securities markets, valuation of securities, retention of portfolios. Prerequi- 
site: Accounting 524. 

546b. Corporate Financial Strategy (3-0-3). 

Advanced financial topics of interest to the corporation: value creation, diversification, 
risk-benefit analysis, tax policy, present value. Emphasizes practical problems of the corpo- 
ration. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

547a. Financial Theory (3-0-3). 

Underlying assumptions and maximization problems in finance; demand, supply, and 
cost of money capital; optimal capital structure and dividend policy; investment and 
financial equilibrium in a capital asset pricing world; disequilibrium in the real world. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 524. Not offered every year. 

551a. Commercial Banking and the Entrepreneur (3-0-3). 

Examines the highly competitive and dramatically changing national and international 
financial services markets. Utilizing visiting speakers, case studies, and a computer simula- 
tion. "Bank Presidents' Game," emphasis is placed on understanding the principles and 
concepts of bank management and operations within a complex economic environment. 
Special emphasis is placed on ways in which the entrepreneur selects, works with, and uses 
his/her bank. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 55 

552b. Investment Banking (3-0-3). 

Analysis of the characteristics of the investment banking industry, focusing on topics of 
corporate financial transactions: public offerings, private placements of debt and equity, and 
mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

560b. Law for Accountants (3-0-3). 

Civil law, common law, equity, state and federal court systems, contracts, sales, 
bailments and carriers, bankruptcy, secured transactions. Uniform Commercial Code, and 
the Uniform Partnership Act. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

561a. Legal and Governmental Processes I (3-0-3). 

Impact of law and government on decision making in business, featuring comparisons 
of governmental intervention across major industrial systems; analysis of environmental 
trends and public policy options. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

562b. Legal and Governmental Processes II (3-0-3). 

Law as the medium in which American society and business function; legal history, 
jurisprudential bases, theory and practice of principal kinds of law: common law, statute law, 
constitutional law, and law of government control. Prerequisite: Administration 561. 

563a. Public Administration (3-0-3). 

The administration and implementation of public policies across federal, state, and 
substate governments. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Also offered as Political Sci- 
ence 537. 

564a. Public Financial Management (3-0-3). 

Political, economic, and accounting dimensions of financial management in public and 
nonprofit organizations. Emphasis on budgeting systems, appropriations processes, cost- 
benefit analysis, taxation, pricing, fund accounting, debt management, financial administra- 
tion. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or graduate standing. Also offered as Political 
Science 564. Not offered every year. 

571b. Political Risk Analysis (3-0-3). 

Analyses of political and social factors affecting business operations abroad, including 
domestic instability, foreign conflict, corruption, nationalization, indigenization, etc. A 
simulation exercise is required. Also offered as Political Science 571. 

573a. Global Strategic Management (3-0-3). 

Changes in international competition, techniques for analysis of economic forces, 
changes in governance, and the concepts of competitive strategy and globalization of 
technology and the marketplace. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

574b. Regulatory Law ofTransnational Business Operations (3-0-3). 

Topics in U.S. and foreign law as they relate to the law/business interface of importing/ 
exporting/trade problems, foreign operations, foreign investment, extraterritonal impact of 
U.S. law, corporate organization, foreign exchange, joint ventures, withdrawal from foreign 
ventures, and third country manufacturing. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Not offered 
every year. 

581a. Marketing Strategy and Management (3-0-3). 

Introduces decisions, concepts, and methodologies which constitute the field of market- 
ing. Places student in the decision-making role concerning product, advertising, pricing, 
promotion, sales force, and distribution decisions. Uses a case analysis format to illustrate 
strategic marketing and marketing management. In addition, students participate in a 
course-long marketing simulation. Prerequisite: Administration 542. 



1 56 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

582a. Marketing Research (3-0-3). 

Emphasizes design, execution, and analysis of marketing research. Topics include 
experimental, survey, and questionnaire design; specification of sampling and coding 
schemes; and the application and interpretation of such multivariate methodologies as 
analysis of variance, multiple regression, factor analysis, and conjoint measurement. Prereq- 
uisite: Administration 542. 

584b. Product Management (3-0-3). 

Applies various dimensions of marketing strategy and management to role of product 
manager, who is responsible for all aspects of developing and marketing a particular product. 
Prerequisite: Administration 542. 

585a. New Product Marlceting (3-0-3). 

Introduces the student to all aspects of designing and marketing a new product. From 
techniques to stimulate creative thinking through the concept test and finally the new 
product introduction, the student is exposed to relevant concepts and methodologies that aid 
the marketer of new products. Prerequisite: Administration 542. Not offered in 1 988-89. 

586b. Marketing for Small Businesses (3-0-3). 

Teams of students work throughout the semester with a small Houston business to 
develop a strategic marketing plan, including a market opportunity analysis and an analysis 
of the competitive structure. Prerequisite: Administration 542. 

591a. Management Strategy I (3-0-3). 

Examination of managerial and organizational problems in the private and public 
sectors which illustrate fundamental principles of domestic and international management 
practice. This course integrates key management skills taught in other core courses. Exten- 
sive use of case materials and student presentations. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

592b. Management Strategy II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Administration 591. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. 

593a. Topics in Management I (3-0-3). 

Section 1: Production and Operations Management. Section 2: Health Care Systems. 
Section 3: Service Firms. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Not offered every year. 

594b. Topics in Management II (3-0-3). 

Section 1 : Public-Private Partnerships (also offered as Political Science 566). Section 2: 
Management of Technology (including professional and technical personnel). Section 3: 
Productivity. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Not offered every year. 

595a. Social and Ethical Responsibility of Business(3-0-3). 

Examines the ethical dimensions of management, including the social responsibility of 
business. Theories and methods of ethical reasoning are considered. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing or instructor permission. Not offered every year. 

597a. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Independent study or directed reading on an approved project under faculty supervi- 
sion. Enrollment by special permission. 

598b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 
See Administration 597. 



ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZATION 1 57 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilization 



Professors Cuthbertson, Drew, Kelber, R. Mcintosh, S. Mcintosh, 

Levin, Van Helden 

Associate Professors Maranhao, Wallace, Widrig 

Assistant Professors Maas, Morrison, Ulrich, Yunis 

Lecturers Benjamin, Dunne, Eaker 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilization is an interdisciplinary major that ex- 
plores the cultural traditions of ancient Greece and Rome, Judaism, early Christi- 
anity, and their antecedents. We study these traditions not only for their intrinsic 
interest and value, but because of their contribution to modern society in the West. 
Thus as well as providing instruction in ancient cultural history in its widest sense, 
the major offers perspectives in cultural criticism, for it examines the beginnings of 
a civilization in which we, the examiners, still participate. To achieve a balanced 
interdisciplinary approach the major is planned around a series of courses in 
Anthropology, Art History, Classics, History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies. 
The major as well provides opportunities for archeological field work and study 
abroad. 

Rice is a sponsor of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, 
managed by Stanford University. Students in the major are encouraged to study in 
this program. 

Requirements: A student majoring in Ancient Mediterranean Civilization 
must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours. These must include History 20 1 , 
one year of an ancient language, and one course each in ancient Philosophy, 
Religious Studies, and Art History. Students may fulfill the language requirement 
by examinafion. All prospective programs for individuals majoring in Ancient 
Mediterranean Civilization are to be drawn up in consultation with a member of 
the staff. 

As a second major: In consultation with the staff a maximum of six semester 
hours (two courses) outside of the Ancient Mediterranean Civilization Major but 
related to the student's plan of study may be substituted for an equivalent number 
of hours/courses in the major. 

Courses: 
Core Course 

201a. Introduction to Ancient History (3-0-3). 

Not offeredl 988-89. ., .^ 

Mr. Maas 



1 5 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

/. Language, Literature and Culture 

Greek 

101a. Elementary Greek I (3-0-3). 

102b. Elementary Greek II (3-0-3). 

301a. Intermediate Greek: Lysias (3-0-3). 

302b. Intermediate Greek: Homer (3-0-3). 

Latin 

101a. Elementary Latin I (3-0-3). 

102b. Elementary Latin II (3-0-3). 

201a. Intermediate Latin: Catullus (3-0-3). 

202b. Intermediate Latin: Prose (3-0-3). 

301a. 401a. Horace (3-0-3). 

302b. 402b. Tacitus (3-0-3). 



303a. Cicero (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

304b. Lucretius (3-0-3) 

Not offered 1989. 

305a. Virgil (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988-89. 

306a. Ovid (3-0-3) 

Not offered 1988-89. 

312. Medieval Latin (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 



Ms. Eaker 

Ms. Eaker 

Ms. Eaker 

Ms. Wallace 



Mr. Yunis 


Ms. Wallace 


Ms. Wallace 


Ms. Eaker 


Mr. Levin 


Mr. Yunis 


Staff 


Staff 


Staff 


Staff 


Ms. Eaker 



ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZATION 1 59 

Classical Studies 

211a. Greek Civilization (3-0-3). 



212b. Roman Civilization (3-0-3). 

222b. Perspectives on Greek Tragedy (3-0-3). 



336a. Classical Mythology II (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

335b. Classical Mythology I (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

352b. Periclean Athens (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 



Anthropology 

224a. The Culture of Ancient Greece (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

314a. Orality, Literacy and Culture (3-0-3). 



330b. Western Rhetorical Traditions (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

//. Art History, Classical Archaeology and Prehistory 

History of Art 

305. Greek Art and Archaeology I (3-0-3). 

306. Greek Art and Archaeology II (3-0-3). 
308b. Roman Art and Archaeology (3-0-3). 



309a. Late Antique and Early Christian Art (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

310b. Byzantine Art (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 



Ms. Wallace 
Ms. Wallace 
Mr. Yunis 
Mr. Levin 
Mr. Levin 
Mr. Yunis 

Mr. Maranhdo 
Mr. Maranhdo 
Mr. Maranhdo 



Mr. Ulrich 
Mr. Ulrich 
Mr. Ulrich 
Mr. Widrig 
Mr. Widrig 



483 a, b. 484 a, b. Archaeological Field Work and Research (3-0-3). 

Mr. Widrig, Mr. Ulrich 



1 60 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



492, Art in the Age of Augustus (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988-89. 

494. Ancient Cities (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988-89. 



Anthropology 

205a. Introduction to Archaeology (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988-89. 

211b. Early Civilizations (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988-89. 

216b. Introduction to World Prehistory (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

362b. Archaeological Field Techniques (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989-90. 

460b. Advanced Archaeological Theory (3-0-3). 



///. History 

152b. Freshman Seminar in Ancient History (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

306b. Politics and Society in Ancient Greece (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

307a. Imperial Rome from Caesar to Diocletian (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

308b. The World of Late Antiquity (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1 989. 

309a. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire in the West (3 

Not offered 1988. ^ 

337a. History of Ancient and Medieval Law (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

Political Science 

340b. Ancient and Medieval Political Theory (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

IV. Philosophy and Religion 

Philosophy 

201a. History of Philosophy (3-0-3). 



Mr. Ulrich 
Mr. Ulrich 

Mr. Mcintosh 
Mr. Mcintosh 
Ms. Mcintosh 
Mr. Mcintosh 
Mr. Mcintosh 

Mr. Maas 
Mr. Maas 
Mr. Maas 
Mr. Maas 
Mr. Maas 
Ms. Drew 



Mr. Cuthbertson 



-0-3) 



Mr. Morrison 



301b. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Religious Studies 

205a. Archaeology and the Bible (3-0-3). 



307a. Christian Origins (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

308b. Synoptic Gospels (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

310b. Pauline Correspondence (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989-90. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 161 

Mr. Morrison 

Mr. Benjamin 
Mr. Kelber 
Mr. Kelber 
Mr. Kelber 



312b. History of Religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam (3-0-3). 



355a. Biblical Ancestors and Heroes (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1988. 

356b. Prophets (3-0-3) 

Not offered 1989. 

357a. Women in the Bible (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1989. 

358b. Bible, Creation and Apocalypse (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1 990. 



Ms. Dunn 
Mr. Benjamin 
Mr. Benjamin 
Mr. Benjamin 
Mr. Benjamin 



Anthropology 



Professor Marcus, Chair 

Professor R.J. Mcintosh, Acting Chair 1988-89 

Professors P.W. Davis, Fischer, S.K. Mcintosh, and Tyler 

Associate Professors Maranhao, Taylor, and Traweek 

Adjunct Associate Professors Gibson and Schreiber 

Assistant Professors Georges and Kellogg 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Biesele 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; B.A. in behavioral science 

Undergraduate Program: Anthropology is a discipline that encompasses many 
subjects of study, all related to understanding human beings and their cultures. A 
student may organize a major in one or more of anthropology's principal fields or 
may combine a major in anthropology with one in another discipline. Students 
majoring in anthropology are required to take a total of 30 semester hours in 
anthropology (ten semester courses). Majors must devise a plan of study in 
consultation with a faculty adviser. Although there are no required courses. 



1 62 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

students will be encouraged to gain exposure to all of the principal fields within 
anthropology (archaeology; biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology). On 
declaring a major in anthropology, a student should meet with the departmental 
undergraduate adviser in order to tailor a major plan in line with the student's 
interests. This plan can be modified at any time with the approval of the adviser. 

With departmental approval, a maximum of 6 semester hours (two courses) 
outside of anthropology but related to the student's plan of study may be substitut- 
ed for hours/courses in anthropology. Majors who plan to pursue graduate training 
toward a career in anthropology will need a reading knowledge of one or two 
European languages and are urged to enroll in undergraduate language courses. 
These majors are also urged to apply for admission to the honors program. 

Honors Program. The primary purpose of the Honors Program is to provide 
selected undergraduate majors with an opportunity to receive advanced training, 
particularly in the planning and execution of independent research, within their 
chosen areas of specialization in anthropology. A secondary purpose of the pro- 
gram is to establish an administrative framework for the formal recognition of 
outstanding students. Majors considering a career in anthropology are strongly 
encouraged to apply, as are all others who desire the experience of an intensive, 
individual research project as part of their undergraduate education. 

Acceptance into the program is at the discretion of the anthropology faculty. A 
statement of eligibility requirements and program requirements is available in the 
departmental office. 

Behavioral Science Major. The major in behavioral science centers on a 
nucleus of courses in anthropology, psychology, and sociology. The student ordi- 
narily, but not necessarily, emphasizes one of these three fields. 

Students majoring in behavioral science are required to take a minimum of 30 
semester hours (ten semester courses) in anthropology, psychology, or sociology, of 
which 24 hours (eight courses) must be courses numbered 300 or higher. A 
minimum of 6 semester hours (two courses) in each of the three fields of anthropol- 
ogy, psychology, and sociology is required. With the approval of the major adviser, 
a maximum of six semester hours (two courses) in courses numbered 300 or higher 
in related fields outside the core fields may be included in the major. Six semester 
hours (two courses) at the 200 level may be substituted for advanced courses if they 
are in a field of the major in which no courses have been taken previously. Students 
are encouraged to plan in consultation with the program adviser an independent 
study course (to be taken in the fall of their senior year) that integrates the varying 
perspectives of anthropology, psychology, and sociology. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program offers advanced training in social/ 
cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and archaeology, leading to a 
Ph.D. in anthropology. The M.A. is optionally offered upon approval of candidacy 
for the Ph.D. The M.A. as a terminal degree requires satisfactory completion of 30 
semester hours of course work approved by an adviser, satisfactory completion of 
one of the special papers (see uniform requirements for the Ph.D.), and a thesis. 
Although there are uniform requirements for the Ph.D. degree, each field of 
specialization offers different opportunities for training and different topical 
research orientations reflecting the interests of the faculty. Consequently, the 
Department seeks applicants with a defined interest in one of the broad fields of 
specialization within anthropology. An undergraduate background in anthropolo- 
gy is desirable but not required for admission. In consultation with a major adviser 
and two other faculty members, each entering student is expected to design a 



ANTHROPOLOGY 163 

flexible study plan that emphasizes broad training in a field of specialization and 
the eventual definition of a problem for dissertation research. All first-year stu- 
dents can usually be offered some form of support, ranging from full graduate 
fellowships, which provide tuition plus a stipend, to tuition scholarships only. 
When possible, these awards are renewed for the second year of study. 

Specialization in Social/Cultural Anthropology. The faculty is eclectic in its 
interests, and the program offers exposure to styles of argument and reasoning 
across the range of contemporary theoretical issues in social/cultural anthropolo- 
gy. We emphasize the reading of primary sources of theory, which have inspired 
the discussion and definition of central problems within anthropology. In addi- 
tion, as essential preparation for doctoral research, explicit attention in instruction 
is paid both to field work and to skills in the conception and writing of 
ethnography. 

Specialization in Biological Anthropology. Training in biological anthropolo- 
gy emphasizes biomedical issues, including nutrition, growth and development, 
human adaptation, human genetics, and public health. Students may take advan- 
tage of the extensive resources of the Houston Medical Center through ties 
established with the University of Texas School of Public Health and Graduate 
School of Biomedical Sciences. In addition to work at Rice, degree credit may be 
given for both formal courses offered at the Schools of Public Health and Biomedi- 
cal Sciences and independent study, tutorials, and research with adjunct faculty at 
these institutions. 

Specialization in Archaeology. Training emphasizes research skills in the 
library, field, and laboratory, to be tested by means of the three required research 
papers, at least one of which must be an original data paper. In addition to research 
on the dissertation topic, all students are encouraged to develop at least one 
analytical skill — such as remote sensing, archaeological statistics, osteology, 
geomorphology, and pedology — making use of the excellent laboratory and 
computer facilities at Rice. 

Uniform Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Each entering 
student will devise a detailed first year plan of study and provisional plans for 
succeeding years in consultation with his or her advisers. Seminars and tutorials 
can be arranged on any topic relevant to a student's training, and where appropri- 
ate, these can be conducted in supervisory consultation with scholars in other 
disciplines at Rice as well as with adjunct faculty. During the first two years of 
study, each student will prepare three substantial papers, each emphasizing an 
analytical, research, and writing skill appropriate to the field of specialization. The 
subjects of the papers and their scheduling are major considerations in the ongoing 
consultations between students and their advisers. During the course of study, 
each student must demonstrate reading competency in one foreign language. 
Before advancing to Ph.D. candidacy, a student must prepare a satisfactory 
proposal for dissertation research. Following approval of the research proposal, a 
dissertation committee is appointed. Dissertations are ordinarily based in sub- 
stantial part upon field research. 



1 64 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Anthropology Courses 

200a. Language (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the scientific study of language. The methods of linguistic prehisto- 
ry. The language families of the world and the interrelationship of language and thought. Also 
offered as Linguistics 200. 

Staff 

201a. Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology(3-0-3). 

An introduction to the history, methods, and concepts of the disipline devoted to the 
systematic description and understanding of cultural diversity in human societies. 

AIs. Georges 

202b. Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3-0-3). 

The evolution, genetics, and adaptive significance of human biological differences. 
Includes an examination of the fossil record of human evolution as well as patterns of and 
explanations for variability in modem human populations. 

Ms. Georges 

205a, Introduction to Archaeology (3-0-3). 

Principles and methods of archaeology; an introduction to the elementary concepts of 
the discipline through a series of case studies. 

Staff 

111. Early Civilizations (3-0-3). 

A comparative study of the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus, China, and 
the Maya, emphasizing the causes and conditions of their origins. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

216. Introduction to World Prehistory (3-0-3). 

Survey of the world's past cultures. Emphasis on major archeological discoveries from 
Olduvai Gorge to Pompeii. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Mcintosh 

Ilia. Family (3-0-3). 

Examines sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories of the family. Dis- 
cusses questions such as the universality of the family, the importance of the family for 
society, and the relation between social group and individual. Not offered in 1988.89. 

Mr. Maranhdo 

224b. The Culture of Ancient Greece (3-0-3). 

Readings from the tragedians, the poets, and the philosophers, emphasizing topics such 
as family life, sexuality, mental health, discourse, and communications. Summary of the 
prehistory and ethnology of the Greeks. 

Mr. Maranhao 

111. Witches, Wives, and Warriors: Gender and Symbolism (3-0-3). 

Examination of beliefs concerning men, women, and gender in different cultures, 
including the West, relating to issues of symbolism, power, and the distribution of cultural 
models. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Taylor 

260. Latin America and its Politics: the Anthropological Approach (3-0-3). 

Focuses on widely shared socioeconomic, political, and cultural themes as seen over 
history and in current events. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Taylor 



ANTHROPOLOGY 165 

300b. Linguistic Analysis (3-0-3). 

English and other languages as objects of scientific analysis. Phonological structure, 
morphology and syntax, semantic structures, and techniques of linguistic analysis. Also 
offered as Linguistics 300. 

Mr. Copeland 

301a. Phonology (3-0-3). 

Theory and practice of articulatory phonetics and of methods of determining the 
structural patterns which underlie speech sounds. Also offered as Linguistics 301 . 

Mr. Copeland 

302. Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3). 

Study of semantic categories and their formal expression in morphological, syntactic, 
and lexical units and patterns. Also offered as Linguistics 302. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davis 

305. Historical Linguistics (3-0-3). 

The nature of language change in its social and geographical contexts from the perspec- 
tive of language acquisition. Also offered as Linguistics 305. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Copeland 

306. History of Anthropological Ideas (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the history of anthropology, its theories, and methods. The emphasis 
is upon social and cultural anthropology. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

308b. History as a Cultural Myth (3-0-3). 

Ideas of history and attitudes toward the past as culturally conditioned phenomena. 
Emphasizes history as statement of cultural values as well as conceptualizations of cause, 
change, time, and reality. 

Ms. Kellogg 

309a. Cultural Studies of Science (3-0-3). 

Analyzes several studies of laboratories and research groups around the world to 
investigate how culture impinges upon scientific activity. Evaluates key terms in the study of 
science and technology for their cultural assumptions by using those terms to explicate these 
laboratory studies. Discusses the design of ethnographic studies of scientific and technologi- 
cal laboratories. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Ms. Traweek 

310b. World Ethnography (3-0-3). 

Introduction to cultural geography through survey of geographical and cultural areas of 
the world. Emphasis on the interrelationships between human societies and their physical 
environments. 

Ms. Kellogg 

312. African Prehistory (3-0-3). 

Thematic coverage of developments throughout the continent from the Lower Paleo- 
lithic to medieval times, with emphasis on food production, metallurgy, and the rise of cities 
and complex societies. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

313a. Language and Culture (3-0-3). 

Investigates the relation between language and thought, language and world view, 
language and logic. Also offered as Linguistics 313. 

Mr. Tyler 



1 66 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

314a. Orality, Literacy and Culture (3-0-3). 

The study of sociocultural traditions based on their dominant mode of communication- 
oral, hterate or electronic. 

Mr. Maranhao 

315. Traditional Societies (3-0-3). 

A comparative exploration of symbolic and everyday life in a variety of contemnorarv 
and historical nonindustnal societies, focusing on hunters and gatherers tribal peoples and 
peasants; agrarian civilizations of the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and the Arnencas 
Mot ottered 1988-89. 

Mr. Fischer 

316. Shamanism (3-0-3). 

This course covers the ethnography of shamanism in foraging societies of the world and 
assesses the body ot theory and comparative work on the subject since the middle 19th 
. century. Not offered in 1988-89. 

Stajf 

317. Anthropological Research in Complex Societies (3-0-3). 

A consideration of the relevance of anthropological perspectives, developed in research 
on traditional societies, to theoretical and applied issues raised by other social sciences in the 
study of modem industnal societies. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

319. Politics as Symbolic Process (3-0-3). 

Attention to politics as an expressive phenomenon in Western and non-Western 
198?S' ^^ ^"^^ '" anthropology as well as current cases from the media. Not offered 

Mr. Taylor 

320. Anthropology and Political Economy (3-0-3). 

• .^" investigation of the interrelationships among historic processes; of state formation 
in the West the spread of capitalist economies, and the world-wide changes in national 
regional, and local cultures. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

321. Culture Change (3-0-3). 

Examines ideas concerning change: its locus, direction, causes, and the importance 
assigned to it relative to permanence. Relates cases of actual social change to concepts of 
social system, mdoemization, and evolution. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Ms. Taylor 

323. Intercultural Relationships (3-0-3). 

Intercultural encounters at the levels of historically significant contact between socie- 
ties and tace-to-face relationships between persons. Emphasis on problems of mutual inter- 
pretation and understanding in vanous interactions between Western and non-Western 
peoples. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

325. Elitelore (3-0-3). 

An intensive study of the cultural ideologies and practices of historic and contemporary 
elites in Western societies. The course emphasis will be on case studies, with the frequent use 
ot cross-cultural comparisons. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

326. The Anthropology of Law (3-0-3). 

Social conflict and methods of dispute management in Western and non-Western 
societies' NToff?red"m8^89 "^*'^"*'°"^ ^" ^^"**' ^"^^'' ^^""'^ ^^^^^' ^^^ complex industrial 



ANTHROPOLOGY 167 

330. Western Rhetorical Traditions (3-0-3). 

The different rhetorics of persuasion developed in the Western Euro-American cultural 
tradition including science and philosophy, aesthetics, politics, psychoanalysis and Christi- 
anity. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Maranhdo 

333b. Social and Cultural Theory (3-0-3). 

British functionalism, analytic philosophy, French structuralism, neo-Marxism, phe- 
nomenology, hermeneutics, and ethnomethodology. An intensive review of the major 
sources of theory guiding research in contemporary anthropology. Strongly recommended 
for majors and for students in the humanities. 

Staff 

336. The Art of Ethnography (3-0-3). 

A seminar that explores the experience of doing field work and the problems of 
transforming theory, field experience, and data into a written account. Emphasis is on 
reading field work accounts and gaining ethnographic writing skills. Strongly recommended 
for majors but also for other interested students in the social sciences and humanities. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 

340b. Camera and Culture (3-0-3). 

How photographs come to be produced and read as documentary evidence in science, 
law, history, anthropology and families. How photographs and photographic technology 
shape and are shaped by the cultures in which they are used as a case study in the relations 
between technology and culture. 

Ms. Traweek 

345a. The Person Across Cultures (3-0-3). 

Course discussions and lectures will be built around the central issue of whether the 
"individual" or the "self is uniquely an Euroamerican cultural ideal or whether it is 
universally an aspect of personhood in all cultures. 

Mr. Maranhao 

347b. Culture of Expertise (3-0-3). 

How experts and expertise, primarily in science and technology, shape and are shaped 
by their professional communities, national policies, and international political, economic, 
and intellectual relations. 

Ms. Traweek 

348a. America as a Culture (3-0-3). 

Explorations in community studies, symbolic anthropology, literary criticism, religion, 
and politics. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Fischer 

351a. Thought and Culture in the Contemporary Middle East (3-0-3). 

Social theory of both European and Middle Eastern writers as applied to the Middle 
East; survey of changing social structures. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Fischer 

352. Peoples and Cultures of Oceania (3-0-3). 

The ethnology of the three major cultural divisions of Oceania: Polynesia, Melanesia, 
and Micronesia. Emphasis on political and cultural evolution of pacific societies trom pre- 
European times to the present. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Marcus 



1 6 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

353b. Cultures of India (3-0-3). 

Summary of the prehistory, ethnography, and ethnology of the Indian subcontinent. 
Special emphasis on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Indian philosophy. 

Mr. Tyler 

355a. Cultural Studies of Japan (3-0-3). 

Anthropological studies of diverse experiences of education, work, community, nation, 
person, family, gender, power, and region in Japan. 

Ms. Traweek 

356. Ethnography of Tribal People (3-0-3). 

Some "people" — for example, the Nuer, the Samoans, the Australian aborigines, the 
Hopi and the Navajo — have been studied by anthropologists for decades and in a few cases 
almost a century. This course will review the studies for a particular people, discussing 
change and permanence in their anthropological description and other related issues Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maranhao 

362. Archeological Field Techniques (3-0-3). 

Methods used in field work, laboratory analysis, and interpretation of archaeological 
data from a local site excavated by the class. Prerequisite: Anthropology 205. Not offered 
1 yo5-o9. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

365. Cultural Ecology and the Ancient Landscape(3-0-3) 

Elementary fluvial and aeolian geomorphology of arid-lands floodplains and applica- 
tion of remote sensing and survey techniques to a series of ethnographic and archaeological 
research problems. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

367a. Human Evolution (3-0-3). 

Overview of the fossil evidence for human evolution, focusing on when and why our 
uniquely human characteristics appeared. 

Ms. Mcintosh 

368. Primatology (3-0-3) 

This course is intended as an introduction to primate diversity, ecology, and sociality, 
based on what is now known from field studies of wild primate populations. Emphasis will be 
placed on the ecological significance of variation among species in diets, reproductive 
patterns, and demography. Not offered 1988-89. 

Staff 

381a. Medical Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease through- 
out the world. 

Ms. Georges 

383a. Human Adaptation (3-0-3). 

Explanations for the range and patterns of human biological differences in the context 
of theories of adaptation. Integrates themes from human genetics, physiology and cultural 
studies. Not offered 1988-89. 

386b. Human Nutrition (3-0-3). 

The anthropology of eating: nutrient requirements; assessment of nutritional status; 
food selection; symbolic, psychological, and cultural aspects of food and food consumption.' 

Ms. Georges 



ANTHROPOLOGY 169 

388. Human Growth and Development: A Biocultural View of the Life Cycle 

(3-0-3). 

Growth and development from conception to old age. Includes consideration of biolog- 
ical aspects of growth, along with ways in which life-cycle phases are defined cross-culturally. 
Not offered 1988-89. 

402b. Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3). 

Study of semantic categories and their formal expression in morphological, syntactic, 
and lexical units and patterns. Also offered as Linguistics 402. 

Mr. Davis 

403. Modern Linguistic Theory (3-0-3). 

Survey of selected theories of language from de Saussure to the present. Also offered as 
Linguistics 303. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davis 

404a,b. Independent Study (Variable). 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on anthropological subjects not 
offered in the curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses are offered. 

406b. Cognitive Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Relations between thought, language, and culture. Special emphasis given to natural 
systems of classification and the logical principles underlying them. 

Mr. Tyler 

407. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3). 

Techniques and practice in the observation, analysis, and recording of a human 
language. Also offered as Linguistics 407. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davis 

408. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3J. 

Continuation of Anthropology 407. Also offered as Linguistics 408. Not offered 1988- 
89. 

Mr. Davis 

409a,b. Special Topics in Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Lectures or seminar devoted to restricted topics reflecting current research interests of 
the staff. Offered irregularly. 

410. The Ethnography of Development (3-0-3). 

This course suggests the necessity of a solid ethnographic grounding for both practical 
development work and for further intellectual growth of the discipline. It addresses the 
dilemmas of economic, social and political development through a survey of case studies and 
critiques. 

Staff 

411b. Neurolinguistics: Language and the Brain (3-0-3). 

Organization of the brain; localization of speech, language, and memory functions; 
hemispheric dominance; and pathologies of speech and language associated with brain 
damage. Also offered as Linguistics 411. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Tyler 

414a. Hermeneutics and Linguistic Anthropology(3-0-3). 

Application of linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. 
Discourse analysis; the structure and interpretation of texts and conversation. 

Mr. Tyler 



1 70 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



420b. Symbolic Archaeology of Prehistoric Art (3-0-3). 

Critical evaluation of interpretations of ancient rock art, with concentration on the Rice 
Lower Pecos project. Students will learn the Apple program developed for this project and 
will take field trips to the rock shelter sites. Prerequisite 205. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

446. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Seminar on contemporary research on the biomedical aspects of human health and 
disease. Includes topics from medical ecology and epidemiology. Not offered 1988-89 

'staff 

458b. Human Osteology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the analysis of human skeletal material from archaeological sites. 

Ms. Mcintosh 

460b. Advanced Archaeological Theory (3-0-3). 

History and analysis of the major currents of archaeological theory from the En- 
cyclopaedist origins of positivism, through cultural evolutionism and historical particular- 
ism, to the New Archaeology and current trends. Prerequisite: Anthropology 205. 

Mr. Mcintosh 

490a. Directed Honors Research (3-0-3). 

, e ^ two-semester sequence of independent research culminating in the preparation and 
defense of an honors thesis. Open only to candidates formally accepted into the honors 
program. 

491b. Directed Honors Research (3-0-3). 

See Anthropology 490. 



506. History of Anthropological Ideas (3-0-3). 
See 306. 



508b. History as a Cultural Myth (3-0-3). 
See 308. 



509. Cultural Studies of Science 

See 309. 



513a. Language and Culture (3-0-3). 
See 313. 



514a. Orality, Literacy and Culture (3-0-3). 
See 314. 



524. Culture of Ancient Greece (3-0-3). 
See 224. 



533b. Social and Cultural Theory (3-0-3). 
See 333. 



Mr. Marcus 



Ms. Biesele 



Ms. Traweek 



Mr. Tyler 



Mr. Maranhao 



Mr. Maranhao 



Mr. Fischer 



536. The Art of Ethnography (3-0-3). 
See 336. 



§40a. Camera and Culture 

See 340. 



545a. The Person Across Cultures (3-0-3). 

See 345. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 1 7 1 



Mr. Marcus 



Ms. Traweek 



Mr. Maranhao 



547b. Culture of Expertise (3-0-3). 
See 347. 



Ms. Traweek 



548. America as a Culture (3-0-3). 
See 348. 



Mr. Fischer 



553b. Cultures of India (3-0-3). 
See 353. 



Mr. Tyler 



555a. Cultural Studies of Japan (3-0-3). 
See 355. 



Ms. Traweek 



556. Ethnography of Tribal People (3-0-3). 
See 356. 



Mr. Maranhao 



562. Archaeological Field Techniques (3-0-3). 
See 362. 



Mr. Mcintosh 



565. Cultural Ecology and the Ancient Landscape (3-0-3). 
See 365. 



Mr. Mcintosh 



567a. Human Evolution (3-0-3). 
See 367. 



Ms. Mcintosh 



568. Primatology 

See 368. 



Mr. Rasmussen 



581a. Medical Anthropology (3-0-3). 
See 38 L 



Ms. Georges 



583. Human Adaptation (3-0-3). 
See 383. 



Mr. Rasmussen 



1 72 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



586b. Human Nutrition (3-0-3). 
See 386. 



600a^b. Independent Study (Credit variable). 

606b. Cognitive Anthropology (3-0-3). 
See 406. 



607a. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3). 
See 407. 



608b. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3). 
See 408. 



609a,b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

614a. Hermaneutics and Linguistic Anthropology(3-0-3). 

See 414. 



620b. Symbolic Archaeology of Prehistoric Art (3-0-3). 
See 420. 



658b. Human Osteology (3-0-3). 
See 458. 



660b. Advanced Archaeological Theory 

See 460. 



800a,b. Research and Thesis (Credit variable). 

School of Architecture 



Ms. Georges 



Mr. Tyler 



Mr. Davis 



Mr. Davis 



Mr. Tyler 



Mr. Mcintosh 



Ms. Mcintosh 



Mr. Mcintosh 



Professor O. J. Mitchell, Dean 
Professors Cannady, Casbarian, Papademetriou, and Todd 

Visiting Professors Wilford and Samuels 

Associate Professors Parsons, Waldman, and Wittenberg 

Assistant Professors Bavinger, Ingersoll, Pope, and Sherman 

Lecturers Blackburn, Colaco, Cunningham, Ford, 

Mixon, Reiner, and White 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.Arch.,M.Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 173 



Preceptors 



Cambridge Seven Associates 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Gensler and Associates, Inc. 
San Francisco, California 

Kaplan, McLaughlin, Diaz 
San Francisco, California 

Kliment and Halsband 
New York, New York 

Kohn, Pedersen & Fox Architects 
New York, New York 

Machado & Silvetti Assoc, Inc. 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Mitchell/Giurgola Associates 
New York, New York 

Morphosis 

Los Angeles, CA 

Murphy/Jahn 
Chicago, Illinois 

I.M. Pei & Partners 
New York, New York 

Cesar Pelli & Associates 
New Haven, Connecticut 

RTKL Associates 
Dallas, Texas 



RTKL Associates 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Rogers-Nagel-Langhart 
Denver, Colorado 

Harry Seidler Associates 
Sydney, Australia 

Skidmore Owings & Merrill 
Chicago, Illinois 

Robert A. Stern Architects 
New York, New York 

James Stirling — Michael Wilford & 

Assoc. 
London, England 

Taller De Arquitectura 
Barcelona, Spain 

Charles Tapley Associates 
Houston, Texas 

Venturi Rauch, Scott-Brown 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Architektengroep 
Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

Wallace, Roberts & Todd 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



The School of Architecture seeks to contribute through teaching and research 
to a more humane environment. Its primary educational missions are teaching and 
research, development of a broad liberal education for undergraduates in the allied 
sciences and arts of architecture, and professional education at the graduate and 
postgraduate level in architecture and urban design. 

These programs are offered in the setting of a small school to provide intimate 
student-faculty interaction, freedom for learning, and unrestricted institutional 
cooperation within and outside the University. 

Degrees Offered. Five degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Architecture, Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban Design, 
and Doctor of Architecture. The Bachelor of Arts, a liberal arts degree, may 
emphasize a major in either architecture or architectural studies; the two programs 



1 74 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

are described below. The B. A. is awarded after successful completion of the first 
four years of study. The Bachelor of Architecture is available to recipients of the 
B. A. degree from Rice and requires two additional years of work, one of which is an 
in-service preceptorship in a professional office. 

The master's degrees are awarded after successful completion of a minimum 
of two years of study beyond the B.A., depending upon previous undergraduate 
and professional studies. Recipients of the B.A. degree from Rice normally under- 
take a minimum of three semesters of further work for one of the Master of 
Architecture degrees. Approval of Rice students for admission to either bachelor's 
or master's programs is contingent upon evaluation of the student's undergraduate 
academic record at the conclusion of the fourth year of study. The Master of 
Architecture is an accredited first professional degree, whereas the Master of 
Architecture in Urban Design requires prior or concurrent completion of accredit- 
ed bachelor's or master's degrees. 

Undergraduate Program. For both the B.A. and the B.Arch. degrees, the first 
two years center upon a carefully integrated study of the principles of architecture. 
In the third and fourth years, students are encouraged to develop their own 
interests through more specialized study of particular aspects of the field in studio, 
seminar, and lecture courses. 

Below is a suggested course of study for either the B.A. or the B.Arch. degree. 
The order in which courses are taken is optional, subject to the following excep- 
tions: ( 1 ) health and physical education must be taken in the first year, and (2) 
failure to take prerequisite courses in the earlier years may result in later schedul- 
ing problems. 



Typical Curriculum 



First semester (fall): 
Architecture 101a — 

Principles of Architecture I 
(studio); 
History of Art 205a — 

Introduction to the History of Art; 
Physics 101a — Mechanics of Physics 

or Physics 12 la — Technical 
Physics 

I; two other courses and physical 

education. 



Second semester (spring): 
Architecture 1 02b — 

Principles of Architecture I 
(studio); 
History of Art 206b — 

Introduction to the History of Art; 
Architecture 132b — Changing 

Perspectives of Architecture; 
Physics 1 02b — Electricity and 

Magnetism or 
Physics 1 22b — Technical Physics II; 
two other courses and physical 

education. 



Third semester (fall): 
Architecture 201a — 

Principles of Architecture 
(studio); 
History of Art 345a — Renaissance 

and Baroque Architecture; 
Architecture 2 1 3a — Structural 

and Constructional Systems I; 
an elective in studio art; 
one other course. 



Fourth semester (spring): 
Architecture 202b — Principles of 
II Architecture II (studio); 

History of Art 346b — 

Modern Architecture; 
Architecture 2 1 4b — Structural 

and Constructional Systems II; 
two other courses. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 175 



Fifth semester (fall): 
Architecture 301a — Principles 

of Architecture III (studio); 
Architectures 1 5a — Intermediate 

Architectural Technology; 
an elective in the social sciences; 
an elective in studio art or visual 

communications; 
one other course. 



Sixth semester (spring): 
Architecture 302b — Selected 

Architectural Problems I (studio); 
Architecture 3 1 6b — Intermediate 

Architectural Technology; 
an elective in social science; 
two other courses. 



Seventh semester (fall): 
Architecture 401a — Principles 

of Architecture IV (studio); 
an elective in environmental sciences; 
three other courses. 



Eighth semester (spring): 
Architecture 402b — Selected 

Architectural Problems Il(studio); 
an elective in environmental sciences; 
three other courses. 



The four-semester Bachelor of Architecture sequence complements the 
preprofessional undergraduate architecture major offered at Rice. It begins with a 
two-semester preceptorship (Architecture 500a, b — Preceptorship I and II) as- 
signed to graduating seniors in the offices of leading practitioners in the United 
States and abroad. The preceptorship is followed by two semesters of studio and 
course work at the graduate level. 



Typical Curriculum 



First semester (fall): 

Architecture 500a — Preceptorship I. 

Third semester (fall): 
Architecture 601a — 
Architectural Problems (studio) or 
Architecture 603a — Urban Design 

Workshop; or 
Architecture 605a — Building Design 
Workshop; 
two or three elective courses. 



Second semester (spring): 
Architecture 500b — Preceptorship II. 

Fourth semester (spring): 
Architecture 602b — 

Architectural Problems (studio) or 
Architecture 604b — 

Urban Design Problems (studio) or 
Architecture 608b — Design 

Thesis (studio) 
two or three elective courses to satisfy 

minimum degree requirement 

of fiveelectives. 



Architecture 607a — Design Thesis (seminar) is a prerequisite for Architec- 
ture 608b. At least one urban design studio must be completed before graduation 
either as part of the preprofessional undergraduate major or as part of the Bachelor 
of Architecture program. Students must also take at least one elective course in 
urban design and two in building design. Architecture 605a — Building Design 
Workshop may be taken in lieu of the third semester studio. 



1 76 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The following information outlines the requirements for undergraduate de- 
grees in the School of Architecture: 

1 . For a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Architecture the require- 
ments are 95 semester hours credit chosen from architecture and 
nondepartmental listings in a manner satisfying School of Architecture 
distribution requirements p/M5 36 semester hours credit of electives for a 
total of 1 3 1 semester hours credit that complete University distribution 
requirements. 

2. For a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Architectural Studies the 
requirements are 53 hours credit chosen from architecture and 
nondepartmental listings in a manner satisfying School of Architecture 
distribution requirements p/M5 78 semesterhours credit of electives for a 
total of 1 3 1 semester hours credit that complete university distribution 
requirements. 

3. For a Bachelor of Architecture degree the requirements are: completion of 
a B.A. degree with a major in architecture (see 1 above); completion of a 
two-semester Preceptorship (30 semester hours credit); and completion 
of two studios and four lecture-seminar courses (32 semester hours 
credit). 

B.A. students have two options in their choice of a preprofessional major 
during the third and fourth years: 

1 . The architecture major requires two years of advanced studio courses and 
additional professional group requirements that permit reasonable elec- 
tive freedom. This curriculum serves the needs of students who anticipate 
professional studies at an advanced level and who wish to have the 
alternatives of doing so through either the Bachelor of Architecture at 
Rice or various first professionalmaster's degrees at Rice or other 
institutions. 

2. The architectural studies major requires two years ofadvanced work 
combining architectural studies with other fields. It is focused on an 
approved, preprofessional theme for interdisciplinary studies chosen by 
the individual and approved by an adviser. Application to this program 
must be made during the second year of studies. Reduced architectural 
course requirements encourage the pursuit of a double major with anoth- 
er department. This curriculum can be regarded as the equivalent of a 
liberal arts education, but it also offers opportunity to prepare for a wide 
variety of graduate studies and career options in different design and 
planning related fields at Rice or other institutions. This program pro- 
vides opportunity to pursue architectural or urban design master's degree 
programs at Rice by entering through the Qualifying Graduate Program, 
but it does not include the option of a Rice Bachelor of Architecture. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the B.A. degree with either above major, 
students may apply during the senior year for admission to the appropriate 
advanced professional degree programs. 

Auxiliary services at Rice span the gap between school and practice: the 
preceptorship program, the visiting lecturer series, and the visiting critic series. 
The preceptorship program is designed to bridge classroom studio learning and 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 177 

professional practice. Qualified students who have been admitted to the profes- 
sional degree programs work for an entire year with outstanding architects 
throughout the world who are designated by the school as preceptors. The timing of 
preceptorship service varies according to the level of design and technical profi- 
ciency reached during the B.A. program. For those admitted to the Bachelor of 
Architecture, the preceptorship occurs immediately on the receipt of the B.A. 

Notes 

1. History of Art 205, 206 are required in the first two years and will be 
scheduled where history of art electives are noted. History of Art 345, 346 
are required for a major in architecture. 

2. Electives must satisfy School of Architecture distribution requirements in 
addition to general University requirements. 

3. Studio courses (Architecture 201, 202; 301, 302; and 401, 402) which 
carry six semester hours each semester in the sophomore, junior, and 
senior years count toward graduation as the equivalent of one course per 
semester in the sophomore year and as two courses per semester in the 
junior and senior years. 

4. Students contemplating later specialization in the fields of structural or 
environmental engineering are advised to take Mathematics 101, 1 02 and 
Physics 101, 102 and 132. 

Graduate Programs. The School of Architecture offers the degrees of Master of 
Architecture and Master of Architecture in Urban Design. Within the two degree 
programs, varied areas of interest are open to students. 

An advanced building design curriculum is the basis for the Master of Archi- 
tecture degree program. This program is designed to provide the student an 
individual course of study with a wide choice of special project, research, and 
internship opportunities both within and outside the School of Architecture. 

The first year of the urban design curriculum is composed of studio and 
lecture courses. The second year allows a student choice and specialization in the 
areas of interest listed above. 

Graduate studies are open to candidates who hold the degree of Bachelor of 
Architecture, Bachelor of Arts with a major in architecture, or Bachelor of Arts in 
other disciplines. Candidates with a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
architecture are normally expected to complete four academic semestersplus one 
semester of clinical education, which may occur in the intervening summer. 
Students without sufficient architectural background are expected to complete a 
program of special studies before admission to one of the graduate options. This 
program takes a minimum of two semesters, depending on the individual's prepa- 
ration, and stresses history, theory, technology, and design techniques. 

Students not possessing a prior first professional degree and completing the 
urban design program requirements receive a Master of Architecture degree with a 
certificate in urban design. 

For students having a bachelor's degree with no architectural background, the 
Qualifying Graduate Program is offered. This is normally a seven-semester pro- 
gram leading to the Master of Architecture degree. The first four semesters consist 
of special studio offerings plus selected seminar and lecture courses. The last three 
semesters are spent in the regular graduate programs. 



1 78 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

All candidates for a master's degree must complete a written thesis or a design 
thesis. 

Doctor of Architecture. Admission to the Doctor of Architecture program 
requires a master'sdegree in architecture. A student entering with a master's degree 
normally takes one and one-half years of course work before the qualifying 
examination. Candidates should be prepared for advanced analytic and creative 
work in their specialized field. Such preparation may include foreign languages, 
statistics, or a computer language. This requirement is established individually 
when the student is admitted. 

After successful completion of all required course work plus the language examina- 
tion or equivalent, students may apply for the qualifying examination. At this 
time, students must submit an outline of their research program for the doctoral 
dissertation. This dissertation must represent an original contribution to knowl- 
edge in the field of architecture. The completion of the dissertation and the passing 
of the final oral examination required for the doctorate in architecture take a 
minimum of one year. 



Architecture Courses 

101a. Principles of Architecture I (2-6-4). 

Visual studies of restricted dimensions, explorations using simple tools and materials to 
develop an awareness of the environment. Requisite for architecture majors. Limited 
enrollment. 

Mr. Ingersoll 

102b. Principles of Architecture I (2-6-4). 

A development of communication of formal information from further investigation of 
visual structures and their order. Requisite for architecture majors. By permission of 
instructor only. 

Mr. Todd 

132b. Changing Perspectives of Architecture (2-0-2). 

Introductory tutorial. Reading, field trips, and observation of current events and public 
affairs to understand the values, institutions, and nature of environmental changes relating 
to future role and practice of architecture. 

Mr. Mitchell 

201a. Principles of Architecture II (3-9-6). 

Introduction to concepts of beginning architectural design. Manipulation of visual 
structure to render formal and operational information. Design process as problem solving 
with emphasis on conscious method. Requisite for architecture majors. 

Mr. Casharian, Ms. Glitsch 

202b. Principles of Architecture II (3-9-6). 
See Architecture 201. 

Mr. Casbarian, Ms. Glitsch 

213a. Structural and Construction Systems I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to characteristics of structural and construction systems in architectural 
technology. Lab experiments are combined with lectures on systems, methods and their 
historical development. 

Mr. Wittenberg 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 179 

214b. Structural and Construction Systems Ili (3-0-3). 

Application of materials and construction (wood, masonry, concrete, and steel). Case 
studies and field trips. 

Mr. Cunningham 

301a. Principles of Architecture III (2- 1 2-6). 

Intermediate level design problems with emphasis on building technology, program- 
ming and formal design. Requisite for preprofessional major in architecture. Prerequisites: 
Architecture 201 and 202. 

Mr. Wittenberg 

302b. Selected Architectural Problems I (2- 1 2-6). 

Variety of intermediate level problems for developing comprehensive experience in 
design methods and processes. Requisite for preprofessional major in architecture. Prerequi- 
sites: Architecture 201, 202, and 301. 

Mr. Parsons, Mr. Sherman, Mr. Samuels 

315a. Structural and Constructional Systems 111(3-0-3). 

Application of principles of analysis to construction of steel and concrete framed 
structures. Continuation of Architecture 213, 214. 

Mr. Cunningham 

316b. Building Climatology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the thermal performance of buildings. Course is divided into two 
parts: building climatology and air conditioning systems. 

Mr. Wittenberg 

336b. Introduction to Urban Issues (3-0-3). 

Major issues and problems confronting metropolitan centers; emphasis on physical and 
built environment. Visiting lecturers on transportation, housing, education, minority 
problems, new communities, physical development and redevelopment. Course is open to all 
students. 

Mr. Reiner 

341a. Introduction to Urban Design (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the field of urban design emphasizing history, theory, and practice. 
Comparative analyses consider the management of urban growth and change. Open to 
students outside of architecture. 

Mr. Mitchell 

343a. The History of the City (3-0-3). 

Historical survey of the city from Sumer to the Baroque capitals. 

Mr. Ingersoll 

344b. Construction and Design (3-0-3). 

A seminar in which the relationship between the construction of an object and its 
usefulness is explored. The premise in the course is that the way things are made can be one 
credible point of departure for the architectural design process. 

Mr. Parsons 

345a. Natural Environment Factors (3-0-3). 

An overview of issues on natural resource consumption and environmental impact 
pertinent to urban design activities. Also offered as Environment 445. 

Mr. Blackburn 

353a. Photography for Architects (3-0-3). 

Exploration of a variety of photographic techniques for architectural research, design, 
and presentation. Enrollment limited. 

Mr. White 



1 80 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

401a. Principles of Architecture IV ( 1 2-2-6). 

Upper level architectural design problems with an emphasis on program definition in a 
social context, site planning and building organization. Required for preprofessional major 
in architecture. Prerequisites: Architecture 301, 302. 

Mr. Sherman & Visiting Critic 

402b. Selected Architectural Problems II (2- 1 2-6). 
See Architecture 302. 

Mr. Parsons, Mr. Sherman, Mr. Samuels 

410b. Building Climatology (3-0-3). 

Lectures and individual student research dealing with issues governing human comfort 
in buildings. Emphasis is placed on modifying climate through architectural measures that 
exploit the use of natural phenomena. Course requirements include wind tunnel experiments 
and term papers. 

Mr. Parsons 

412b. Advanced Design of Structural Systems (3-0-3). 

Advanced course in structural design. Topics include factors controlling structural 
design of buildings, floor systems, building systems, facade treatments, long span structures, 
pneumatic and cable structures, and new structural systems and materials. Case studies will 
also be conducted. Prerequisites: Architecture 213, 214, 315, or equivalent. 

Mr. Colaco, Mr. Ford 

415a. Architectural Theory and Criticism (3-0-3). 

Seminar dealing with landmark texts in architectural theory and criticism. 

Mr. Sherman 

418b. Fundamental Issues in Modernism (3-0-3). 

Examine fundamental issues of modernism in architecture emerging from both Europe- 
an and American sources. Systematic analysis of the works and writings of major twentieth- 
century architects. 

Mr. Ingersoll 

419a. Advanced Topics in Environmental ControI(3-0-3). 

Advanced study in one or more topics in environmental control, including building 
climatology, energy conservation, lighting, and acoustics. Prerequisite: Architecture 316. 

Mr. Wittenberg 

420b. History of Building Technology (3-0-3). 

Survey of the history of building technology from ancient times to the present. Lectures 
cover theor}', methods and practical applications. 

Mr. Wittenberg 

422a,b. Computer Graphics in Architecture (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theory and practice of computer graphics applications in architecture 
including instruction in both conceptual aspects and programming techniques. 

Mr. Bavinger 

424b. Computer Aided Design (3-0-3). 

Advanced computer graphic techniques using CAD in architecture as a design & 
presentation medium. 

Mr. Bavinger 

427a. Dualities in Architecture (3-0-3). 

A course in design theory built around the theme of recurrent dualities in form and 
function. Course material covers the composition of building forms and culminates with an 
examination of the urban fabric. 

Mr. Waldman 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 1 8 1 

437a. Computer Applications (3-0-3). 

Individual projects in the application of computer technology to architectural program- 
ine nlannine and urban design, graphic display, and problem analysis. 
^' ^ " Mr. Bavinger 

438b. Computer-Aided Architectural Design (3-0-3). 

Theory and practice of computer-aided design for application to architecture, urban 
design and planning, including instruction in special programming techniques, graphic 
display and data base management. Prerequisite: Architecture 437, 637, or permission of 

^"^^'■"'^°'"- Mr. Bavinger 

440b. Housing Typologies (3-0-3). ^, . u i^ a 

Exploration of the development and elaboration of housing types at the building and 
urban scale. Course offered every other year. ^^ Waldman 

451b. Architectural Measured Drawing (3-0-3). , 

Analysis of historic and contemporary examples of architecture or civil engineering 
through measured drawings constructed to standards. Drawings become part of a permanent 
architectural archive. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Permission °^ ' Jf^^'^^^^J^^^^^,^,^^^ 

461a,b. Special Projects (Credit variable). u r i. k 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member. 
Subject to approval of faculty adviser and director. Very limited enrollment^^^ Wittenberg 

500a,b. Preceptorship Program (0-0- 15). , ru „« a 

Requisite for admission to graduate studies in architecture for al recipients of Rice B. A. 

degrees in preprofessional or area majors. Student completes 9 to 12 months of full-time 
internship under guidance of an appointed preceptor. ^^^ Casbarian 

501a. Oualifying Graduate Workshop I (10-1 5-1 3). u . * <. ^r 

Remiisite for admission to graduate professional program options in architecture or 
urban design for students with nonarchitectural bachelor's degree. Lectures, seminars, 
laboratonet, and design studio projects adjusted to individual needs. Pfequisites deter- 
mined by the Graduate Graduate Affairs Committee with the School ot Architecture. ^^^^ 

502b. Qualifying Graduate Workshop II (5- 1 5- 1 0). 

See Architecture 501. ^^^. ^, .,^,^„^^,^ 

503a. Graduate Workshop III (5-15-10). . ^ .u„ 

Design studio to follow Architecture 501, 502. Preparation for entering studios in the 
regular graduate programs in architecture and urban design in the following ^^"^^^^^p'^^.^^^^^ 

504b. Graduate Workshop IV (5- 1 5- 1 0). 

See Archtecture 503. ^^ p^^^ 

514b. Building Technology and Structures I (3-0-3). ^ , .^«. 

A course inltructures foTstudents in the Qualifying Graduate P'-of «^J«P'" '"^ "^-^ 

structure in architecture: forces and equilibrium; structural materials; the behavior, analysis, 

and design of structural elements and their connections. ^^ Cunningham 



1 82 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

515a. Building Technology and Structures II (3-0-3). 

A second course in structures for students in the Qualifying Graduate Program Addi- 
tional topics in the behavior, analysis, and design of structural elements; synthesis of 
structural elements into structural systems; integration of structural systems with other 
building systems. Prerequisite: Architecture 514. 

Mr. Cunningham 

516b. Building Climatology (3-0-3). 

See Architecture 3 1 6. 

Mr. Wittenberg 

541a. Recent Trends in Architecture (3-0-3) 

A survey of the development, reappraisal & transformation of architectural ideals in the 
period since 1945. 

Mr. Pope 

544b. Construction and Design (3-0-3). 
See Architecture 344. 

Mr. Parsons 

600a,b. Qualifying Graduate Practical Internship (Credit vaiiable). 

Practical work experience for students who have completed at least four semesters in the 
Qualifying Graduate Program prior to their entrance into the regular Master of Architecture 
studio sequence. Permission of instructor required. Very limited enrollment. 

Mr. Todd 

601a. Architectural Problems: Studio (5- 1 5- 1 0). 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes 
of designing specific buildings and facilities. Prerequisite: Architecture 500 or 501-504. 

Mr. Cannady 

602b. Architectural Problems (5-15-1 0). 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes 
of designing specific buildings and facilities. Prerequisite: Architecture 500 or 501-504. 

Mr. Papademetriou 

603a. Urban Design Workshop I (5-1 5-10). 

Introductory studio in urban design with an emphasis on exploration of social and 
environmental forces shaping urban form, as well as the representation of urban design ideas 
The workshop is conducted as a sequence of analytical and design exercises. Requisite for M 
Arch. Urban Design degree. Prerequisite: Architecture 501-504. 

604b. Urban Design Workshop II (5- 1 5- 1 0). 

Developing abstract thought, applied design and planning capabilities to total urban 
systems, large-scale developments, or other broad environmental action. Requisite for M 
Arch. Urban Design degree. Prerequisite: Architecture 603. 

606a,b. Thesis (5- 15- 10). 

Independent investigations in architecture or urban design, culminating in preparation 
and presentation of a master's thesis. 

Mr. Cannady 

607a. Design Thesis: Seminar (3-0-3). 

An applied problem-solving laboratory, preparatory to Architecture 608, in which 
program development, site analysis, and conceptual design studios are pursued' Prereaui- 
site: Architecture 603. 

Mr. Ingersoll 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 183 

608b. Design Thesis: Studio (5-1 5-10). 

A design studio, following Architecture 607, where a building program is carried from 
predesign analysis, through design, to design development. 
Prerequisites: Architecture 501-504, 607. 

Mr. Cannady 

609b. Architecture for Nonarchitects (3-0-3). 

Classroom teaching under the supervision of the instructor. For elective credit only. 

Mr. Casharian 

612b. Advanced Design of Structural Systems (3-0-3). 

See Architecture 4 14. .. ^ , .. r^ j 

Mr. Colaco, Mr. Ford 

615a. Architectural Theory and Criticism (3-0-3). 

Seminar dealing with landmark texts in architectural theory and criticism. Prerequisite: 

permission of instructor. 

Mr. Sherman 



618b. Fundamental Issues in Modernism (3-0-3). 
Same as Architecture 4 1 8. 



619a. Advanced Topics in Environmental Control(3-0-3). 

See Arch 419. 



620b. History of Building Technology (3-0-3). 
Same as Architecture 420. 



Mr. Ingersoll 
Mr. Wittenberg 
Mr. Wittenberg 



621a. Introduction to Urban Design (3-0-3). . . ^ „ u 

Comparative analysis of recent theory and practice in projecting and controUing urban 
growth and change. See Architecture 341. m M't h II 

622a,b. Computer Graphics in Architecture (3-0-3). 

Advanced theory and practice of computer graphics applications in architecture includ- 
ing instruction in both conceptual aspects and programming techniques. . , „ . 
^ Mr. Bavinger 

627a. Dualities in Architecture (3-0-3). 

See Architecture 427. ,^ ,,r ,• 

Mr. Waldman 

635a,b. Computer Projects in Architecture and Urban Development (3-0-3). 

Special projects for advanced students in computer applications. Prerequisite: permis- 
sion of instructor, ly^ D 

Mr. Bavinger 



636b. Introduction to Urban Issues (3-0-3). 
See Architecture 635a. 



Mr. Reiner 



637a. Computer Applications (3-0-3). 

See Architecture 437. 

Mr. Bavinger 



1 84 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



638b. Computer-Aided Architectural Design (3-0-3). 
See Architecture 438. 



640b. Housing Typologies (3-0-3). 
See Architecture 440. 



643a. The History of the City 

See Architecture 343. 



645a. Natural Environmental Factors (3-0-3). 
See Architecture 345. 



Mr. Bavinger 



Mr. Waldman 



Mr. IngersoU 



Mr. Blackburn 



652a. Planning Law (3-0-3). 

Legal and economic considerations in practical land and building development; public 
controls, private/public sector relationships, entrepreneurial objectives, financing methods. 
Case studies in total development "packaging." 

Mr. Mixon 

665a. Graduate Seminar in Architectural Design (3-0-3). 

Seminars structured around topics dealing with design theory, with special emphasis on 
participation by visiting critics and professors. 

Visiting Critic 

666b. Grad Seminar in Architectural Design (3-0-3). 
Same as Architecture 665. 

Visiting Critic 

700a,b. Practicum (Credit variable). 

Full-time internship service in approved local offices under interdisciplinary supervi- 
sion. Emphasis on "real world" design, planning, or research experiences. Special tuition. 
May be taken in any semester or in summer. 

Mr. Cannady 

705a,b. Thesis Seminar (3-0-3). 

Seminar for students enrolled in Architecture 606. 

Mr. IngersoU 

711a,b. Special Projects (Credit variable). 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member subject 
to approval of the student's faculty adviser and director. 

Mr. Cannady 

714a,b. Independent Design Projects (Credit variable). 

Mr. Cannady 

800a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

Mr. Cannady 



ART AND ART HISTORY 185 

Art and Art History 



Professor G.L. Winningham, Chair 

Professors, K.T. Brown, Camfield, (on leave fall 1988-89), Havens and Poulos 

Associate Professors Boterf, Broker, Huberman, 

G. Smith and Widrig 

Assistant Professors Barnes, P.T. Brown, (on leave fall 1988), 

Ulrich and Wilson 

Lecturer, Dobbins 

Visiting Lecturers Davezac, Greene, Lukitsh, McEvilley and Steinhoff-Morrison 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.F.A., M.A. 

The Department of Art and Art History offers courses in three distinct 
disciplines: the history of art, studio art (painting, drawing, sculpture, etc.), and 
film and photography. Majors may elect to concentrate their study in any of these 
areas of specialization. 

Undergraduate Program. A minimum of 38 semester hours is required for the 
full major, including at least 1 1 semester hours in the history of art and nine 
semester hours selected from studio, film, or photography. Double majors must 
take a minimum of 32 semester hours, including at least three courses in both the 
creative arts and the history of art. All majors must complete the two semesters of 
the introductory survey. History of Art 205 and 206. For all majors at least 50 
percent of the required number of courses must be at the 300- or 400-leveI, of 
which more than 50 percent must be taken at Rice. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy all the University requirements for the B.A. degree. See Degree 
Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

A reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian is strongly recommended 
for all majors, especially those who intend to take 300- or 400-level courses in the 
history of art. 

Students interested in further guidance in planning the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a major in art and art history should consult departmental faculty 
advisers. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts Program. The Bachelor of Fine Arts program consists of 
a fifth year of intensive study in the creative arts to be taken after a student has 
obtained a B.A. degree in art at Rice or its equivalent at another university. 
Candidates possessing a B.A. degree with a major in a field other than art may in 
exceptional cases be admitted to the program. Special fifth-year courses are 
available to the B.F.A. candidate only, in addition to advanced courses normally 
offered by the department. Satisfactory completion of a total of 30 semester hours 
in approved courses or the equivalent in approved major electives at the 300-, 
400-, or 500-level is required for the B.F.A. degree. 

Admission to the program is determined by the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing on recommendation of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Committee in the 
Department. For further information about application forms, deadlines, admis- 
sion standards, and the like, write to the chairman of the Department of Art and 
Art History. 



186 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Graduate Program. Qualified students are eligible to apply for the graduate 
program leading to a degree of Master of Arts in art history with an option in 
classical archaeology. Areas of concentration in art history are those in the western 
tradition of European and American Art. Graduate work is also possible in Asian 
Studies. 

Graduate fellowships and scholarships are awarded on the basis of scholarly 
achievement and available funds. Fellowships consist of a stipend and a waiver of 
tuition; scholarships provide only a waiver of tuition. Graduate students as part of 
their training may be expected to render some service as research assistants, 
tutorial instructors, or curatorial assistants in the Sewall Art Gallery. 

Entering students must pass a reading examination in either French or Ger- 
man. In classical archaeology, students must pass a reading examination in one of 
the following languages: French, German, Italian, Greek, or Latin. Other lan- 
guages may be required depending on the course of studies chosen by the student. 
Upon entrance, students may be required to take an examination to be used as a 
guide in determining their programs. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Complete with high standing a minimum of 30 hours of graduate course 
work to include a 3-hour course in art historical concepts, history, and 
methods of research; a 9-hour thesis in the second year; and 1 8 hours of 
lecture, seminar, and reading courses. For students in classical archaeolo- 
gy, 6 hours must be in archaeological field experience applied to specific 
research in addition to the above requirements. 

2. Pass satisfactorily a comprehensive examination in the second year. 

Sewall Art Gallery 

Stella Dobbins, Director 
Sewall Art Gallery, located on the main floor of Sewall Hall, functions as an 
extension of the teaching activities in the Department of Art and Art History, but is 
also oriented to the larger university and Houston community. The gallery actively 
collects art works which are used for instruction, research, loan, and exhibitions. 
Four to six exhibitions are mounted during the academic year, focusing on 
historical and contemporary presentations of painting, sculpture, and graphic, 
video, and performance arts. The gallery is staffed by a professional coordinator 
and students, who gain experience in museum registration methods, exhibition 
techniques, and other aspects of museum work. Junior, senior, or graduate stu- 
dents interested in museum experience may also apply for the Museum Internship, 
offered in cooperation with local museums (see History of Art 496). 



History of Art and Architecture 

History of Art Courses 

205a. Introduction to the History of Art (4-0-4). 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Paleolithic period to the 
fourteenth century. Enrollment limited to 1 25. An additional hour of tutorial per week will be 
assigned during the first week. 

Ms. Brown 



ART AND ART HISTORY 187 

206b. Introduction to the History of Art (4-0-4). 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the twentieth 
century. History of Art 205 strongly recommended. 

Mr. Hallam 



209b. Introduction to Asian Art (3-0-3). 

A survey of the art of Asia from the Neolithic period to the present. 



Mr. Wilson 



218b. History of Film (3-0-3). 

Classic films from both silent and sound eras. Griffith, Eisenstein, Chaplin, Stroheim, 
Sternberg, Renoir, Renais, Godard, Bergman, and others. Attention to technique, theory, 
principles of criticism, relationship to art history in general. Students who have already taken 
History of Art 2 1 5 or 2 1 6 not eligible for credit. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. McEvilley 

220a. History of Photography (3-0-3). 

A topical introductory survey of the history of photography from its pre-history through 
the 1980s. 

Ms. Lukitsh 

291a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Courses at the introductory level or special research and reading. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

292b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

293a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

294b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

295a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

296b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 
Special Topics in film history 

Mr. McEvilley 

305, 306. Greek Art and Archaeology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Fall semester: the Bronze Age; tangible remains of Greek culture from its beginnings to 
the end of the Archaic period. Spring semester: development from Early Classical through 
Hellenistic periods. 

Mr. Ulrich 

308b. Roman Art and Archaeology (3-0-3) 

The painting, sculpture, and architecture of ancient Rome from roots in Etruscan art 
through the Republican and Imperial eras to the age of Constantine. 

309b. Late Antique and Early Christian Art (3-0-3) 

The adaptation of Late Antique art and architecture to Christian content in the 
centuries following Constantine. Offered every other year. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Widrig 

310. Byzantine Art (3-0-3) 

Attempts to define the distinct character of the art of the Eastern Empire from the 
Age of Justinian to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Sufficient consideration will be 
given to Eastern Early Christian art to make meaningful its evolution into Byzantine 
style. Mr. Widrig 



1 88 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

319. Gothic Art (3-0-3) 

A survey of European architecture, sculpture, and painting, both religious and secular, 
from the mid-twelfth century to the early sixteenth century. 

Staff 

321b. Art and the Mind (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in art history, criticism, esthetics, philosophy and the psychology of art. 
Previous art history courses desirable but not required. 

Mr. McEvilley 

345a. Renaissance and Baroque Architecture (3-0-3). 

Renaissance architecture considered as a conscious break with medieval practice; its 
stylistic and theoretical development, primarily in Italy, during the fifteenth, sixteenth, and 
seventeenth centuries. 

Mr. Widrig 

346b. Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Architectural History (3-0-3). 

The origins of modem architecture in rival modes of the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries; the new architecture of Richardson, Sullivan, and Wright; the International Style 
of Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Mies to the mid-twentieth century. 

Mr. Widrig 

355a. American Art: Colonial to 1900 (3-0-3) 

Emphasis on painting and architecture, with some consideration of photography, 
sculpture, and decorative arts. 

Mr. Hallam 

356. American Art of the Twentieth Century. (3-0-3) 

Survey of painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture in the United States from 
1900 to mid-century. 

Mr. Camfield 

361a. Arts of China (3-0-3). 

Chinese painting, sculpture, and decorative arts with special consideration of recent 
archaeological finds. Prerequisite: History of Art 209 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Wilson 

365a. Arts of Japan (3-0-3). 

From pre-Buddhist Japanese art to the impact of Chinese and Korean culture and 
emergence of indigenous Japanese expression in art and architecture. Prerequisite: History 
of Art 209 or permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Wilson 

417a. Baroque Art (3-0-3) 

Exploration of new spaces and expressive possibilities in seventeenth-and eighteenth- 
century art with particular attention to the achievement of major artists and architects. Not 
offered every year. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Staff 

418b. Baroque and Rococo Art (3-0-3) 

See History of Art 417. Not offered every year. Not offered 1988-89. 

Staff 

422. Dutch Painting of the Golden Age 

Not offered every year. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Hallam 



ART AND ART HISTORY 189 

461b. Nineteenth-Century Art (3-0-3) 

Major developments in painting and sculpture from late eighteenth-century Neoclassi- 
cism and Romanticism through Realism and Impressionism. 

Mr. Hallam 

463b. Trends in Art Since 1940 (3-0-3) 

Consideration of trends in the painting and sculpture of American and Europe from 
Abstract Expressionism to the present. Emphasis on American Art and criticism. Prerequi- 
site- History of Art 475 or permission of instructor. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

475a. European Twentieth-Century Art (3-0-3) 

Consideration of major developments in painting and sculpture from the 1 880s to the 
1940s: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism through Expressionism, Cubism, Abstrac- 
tions Dada and Surrealism. Brief consideration of architecture and photography. Not 

offered 1988-89. ^ ^^ 

Staff 

480b. Approaches to Art History (3-0-3). 

Survey of important approaches to the study of art from antiquity to the present; 
theories of art; biographies of artists; connoisseurship; art history as a discipline begmnmg 

with Winckelmann. 

Mr. Davezac 

482a. Buddhist Art and Faith 

Mr. Wilson 

483a. Archaeological Field Work and Research (3-0-3). 

Field work and research applied to specific archaeological problems. 

Mr. Widrig 

484b. Archaeological Field Work and Research (3-0-3). 
See History of Art 483. 

Mr. Widrig 

489b. Two Renaissance Sculptors (3-0-3) 

Donatello & Michelangelo. Prereq. Hart 205, 206, or permission of instructor. 

Ms. Brown 



490b. Three Renaissance Painters (3-0-3) 

Francesca, Da Vinci, Titian. See Hart 489. Not offered 1988-89. 



491a. Special Topics: Topographical Landscape 
492b. Issues in Contemporary Photography 



Mr. Hallam 
Mr. Hallam 

Ms. Lukitsh 



494. Decorative Arts of Asia (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Not offered every year. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wilson 

495a. Museum Intern Program (Credit variable). 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Dobbins 



1 90 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



496b. Museum Internship (Credit variable). 
See History of Art 495. 



Ms. Dobbins 



497a. Senior Thesis (1-0-1 ). 

Thesis written under the direction of a member of the faculty. Limited to senior art 
majors. Prerequisite: permission of faculty. 

498b. Senior Thesis (1-0-1). 

See History of Art 497. 



500b. Approaches to Art History (3-0-3). 
Graduate level. See History of Art 480. 



545a. Graduate Seminar in Renaissance & Baroque Architecture 
546b. Graduate Seminar in 19th & 20th Century Architecture 



575, 576. Topics in Modern Art (Credit variable). 
Not offered every year. 

583a. Archaeological Field Work and Research (3-0-3). 
Graduate level. See History of Art 483,484. 



584b. Archaeological Field Work and Research (3-0-3). 
See History of Art 483. 



585a. Independent Reading (3-0-3). 



586b. Independent Reading (3-0-3). 



Mr. Davezac 

Mr. Widrig 

Mr. Widrig 

Mr. Cornfield 

Mr. Widrig 

Mr. Widrig 
Staff 



591a. Master of Arts Thesis (Credit variable). 

Graduate level courses or special research and reading. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. 

Staff 

592a,b. Master of Arts Thesis (Credit variable). 

593a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

594a,b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

595a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

596a. Special Topics: Graduate Seminar Topographical Landscape (3-0-3). 
Prereq. permission of instructor. 

Mr. Hallam 



ART AND ART HISTORY 191 



Ms. Dobbins 



Ms. Dobbins 



597a. Museum Intern Program (Credit variable). 

See History of Art 495. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

598b. Museum Internship (Credit variable). 

See History of Art 496. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

800a,b,c. Thesis and Research (Credit variable). 

Studio Art, Film and Photography 

Arts Courses 

101a. Design I (0-6-3). 

Principles of two and three-dimensional design problems exploring individual creative 
solutions, various media. Architecture 101 accepted as equivalent. 

Mr. Smith 

205a. Photography I (0-6-3). 

Exploration of the basic materials and processes of the photographic medium; viewing, 
analysis, and discussion of the medium's history and current trends. 

Mr. Winningham, Staff 

206b. Photography I (0-6-3). 

See Arts 205. 

Mr. Winningham 

216b. 35mm Photography (0-6-3). 

An introductory course in black and white 35mm photography. Exploration of the 
materials and process involved in the exposure, development, and printing of 35mm 
negatives. Class critiques, analysis, and discussion of photographic history. Viewing and 
discussion of contemporary work. 

Mr. Brown 

225a,b. Drawing I (0-6-3). 

Introduction to the problems of drawing using various media (pencil, charcoal, pen- 
and-ink, pastel). 

Ms. Barnes, Ms. Broker, Mr. Boterf Mr. Poulos, Staff 

291a. Special Problems in Design (Variable). 

Problems at the introductory level in creative art with individual instruction and 
criticism. May be used in awarding transfer credit. 

292b. Special Problems in Drawing (Variable). 

293a. Special Problems in Drawing (Variable). 

294b. Special Problems in Studio Art (Variable). 

295a. Special Problems in Photography (Variable). 



1 92 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

296b. Special Problems in Film and Videotape Making(Variable). 

See Arts 291. 



Mr. Huberman 



301. Painting I (0-6-3) 

Problems in painting, both traditional and experimental, in various opaque media. 
Prerequisite: Arts 225 or permission of instructor. 

Staff 



302b. Painting I (0-6-3) 

See Arts 301. 



Mr. Boterf 



305a. Photography II (3-3-3). 

Advanced problems in photography. Emphasis on independent pursuit of projects 
submitted by the students. 

Staff 



306b. Photography II (3-3-3). 
See Arts 305. 



311a. Etching I (3-3-3). 

Etching in black and white, color, and monoprint techniques. 



312b. Etching II 



313b. Lithography I (0-6-3). 

Stone lithography in black and white. 



Mr. Winningham 

Ms. Broker 
Ms. Broker 

Ms. Broker 



325a. Life Drawing (0-6-3). 

Drawing from the model in various media. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mr. Poulos 



326b. Life Drawing (0-6-3). 
See Arts 325. 



Ms. Barnes 



327a,b. Film and Videotape Making I (0-5-3). 

A study of the expressive possibilities of the media. Synchronous sound, using super- 
eight millimeter film, plus video tape. 

Mr. Huberman 

328a,b. Film and Videotape Making Tape Making 1(0-5-3). 

One major film project by the class employing 1 6mm film and synchronous sound 
equipment. 

Mr. Huberman 

329a. Film Form (3-0-3). 

Viewing, analysis, and discussion of modern and classic films. 

Mr. Huberman 



ART AND ART HISTORY 1 9 3 

337b. Color Drawing (0-6-3). ^- r . , a . 

Introduction to color using still hfes and employing various media (pastel and water- 
color). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

345a. Color Photography (3-0-3). . , . , u, i 

Fundamental techniques of color photography, including special problems in color 
camera work, color negative and transparency processing, and color printing. Prerequisite: 

Arts 205, 206. ,. .... . , 

Mr. Winningnam 

346b. Color Photography (3-0-3). 

See Arts 345. ,, „.. . , 

Mr. Winningnam 

365a. Sculpture I (0-6-3). _ , ^. 

Sculpture in wood, metal welding, and other sculptural media. 

^ Mr. Smith 

366b. Sculpture I (0-6-3) 

See Arts 365. ,. _ ., 

Mr. Smith 

391b. Special Problems in Drawing (Variable). », . a- 

Problems in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

392a,b. Special Problems in Life Drawing (Variable). 

393a,b. Special Problems in Painting (Variable). 

394a,b. Special Problems in Printmaking (Variable). 



Ms. Broker 
Mr. Brown 



395a,b. Special Problems in Photography (Variable). 

396a,b. Special Problems in Film And Videotape(Variable). 

See Arts 391. ,^ „ , 

Mr. Huberman 

397a. Special Problems in Sculpture (Variable). ., o / 

*^ Mr. Smith 

420a. Advanced Drawing w ^ i 

Ms. Broker 

420b. Advanced Drawing .^ ^ 

Ms. Barnes 

423a. Painting on Paper (0-6-3). „ j v , ^ 

Oil paint, oil stick, collage, and various contemporary mixed media may be employed. 
Enrollment limited to 1 5. Prerequisite: Drawing I or Arts 101. . . „ /- 

Mr. Boterf 



1 94 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

424b. Water Color (0-6-3). 

Both transparent and opaque watercolor media used in a variety of methods. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. Prerequisite: Drawing I and permission of instructor. 

Ms. Barnes 

427a. Film and Videotape Making II ( 1 -5-3). 

One major film project by each student, using either video or 1 6mm film. 

Mr. Huberman 



428b. Film and Videotape Making II ( 1 -5-3). 
See Arts 427. 



Mr. Huberman 



432b. Film Genre: The Western (3-0-3). 

The essential American film experience spanning all the years of U.S. cinema. Focusing 
on the Western, the course concerns itself with the mythic function of this film genre. 

Mr. Huberman 

445a,b. Special Problems in Drawing (Variable). 

Advanced problems in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. May be 
used in awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

446a,b. Special Problems in Drawing (Variable). 

447a,b. Special Problems in Life Drawing (Variable). 

448a,b. Special Problems in Life Drawing (Variable). 

449b,a. Special Problems in Printmaking (Variable). 

450a,b. Special Problems in Printmaking (Variable). 

451a,b. Special Problems in Painting (Variable). 

452a,b. Special Problems in Painting (Variable). 

453a,b. Special Problems in Photography (Variable). 



454b,a. Special Problems in Photography (Variable). 
455a,b. Special Problems in Film and Videotape(Variable). 



456a,b. Special Problems in Film and Videotape(Variable). 
See Arts 445. 



457a. Special Problems in Sculpture (Variable). 
458a,b. Special Problems in Sculpture (Variable). 
465a. Sculpture II 



Mr. Brown 



Mr. Huberman 



Mr. Huberman 



Mr. Smith 



ART AND ART HISTORY 195 



466b. Sculpture II 



Mr. Smith 



475a. Painting II (0-6-3). 

Advanced problems in painting. Emphasis on independent development and participa- 
tion in class critiques. Prerequisite: Painting I and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Poiilos 



476b. Painting II (3-0-3). 
See Arts 475. 



Mr. Poulos 



501a. Studio I: Painting (0-6-3). 

Individual work in the studio arts, film, or photography under the direction of one or 
more staff members. Restricted to B.F.A. degree candidates. 

502b. Studio I: Painting (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 



503a. Studio I: Sculpture (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 



504b. Studio I: Sculpture (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

505a. Studio I: Drawing (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

506b. Studio I: Drawing (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

507a. Studio I: Life Drawing (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

508b. Studio I: Life Drawing (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

509a. Studio I: Design (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

510b. Studio I: Design (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

511a. Studio I: Printmaking (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

512b. Studio I: Printmaking (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 



Mr. Smith 



513a. Studio I: Photography (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 



514b. Studio I: Photography (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 



Mr. Winningham 



1 96 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

515a. Studio I: Filmmaking (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

516b. Studio I: Filmmaking (0-6-3). 
See Arts 501. 

520a. Studio II: Painting (0- 1 2-6). 

The same as Arts 501-516 with increased credit hours. 

521b. Studio II: Painting (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

522a. Studio II: Sculpture (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

523b. Studio II: Sculpture (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

524a. Studio II: Drawing (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

525b. Studio II: Drawing (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

526a. Studio II: Life Drawing (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

527b. Studio II: Life Drawing (0- 1 2-6). 

See Arts 520. 

528a. Studio II: Design (0- 1 2-6) 
See Arts 520. 

529b. Studio II: Design (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

530a. Studio II: Printmaking (0-12-6). 
See Arts 520. 



531b. Studio II: Printmaking (0-12-6). 
See Arts 520. 

532a. Studio II: Photography (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

533b. Studio II: Photography (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 

534a. Studio II: Filmmaking (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 533. 

535b. Studio III: Filmmaking (0- 1 2-6). 
See Arts 520. 



ART AND ART HISTORY 1 97 



540a. Studio III: Painting (0- 1 8-9). 

Same as Arts 501-516 with increased credit hours. 

542a. Studio III: Sculpture (0- 1 8-9). 

See Arts 540. 

544a. Studio III: Printmaking (0- 1 8-9). 
See Arts 540. 



546a. Studio III: Photography (0- 1 8-9). 
See Arts 540. 



Mr. Winningham 



547b. Studio III: Photography (0-18-9). 
See Arts 540. 



548a. Studio III: Filmmaking (0- 1 8-9). 
See Arts 540. 



Mr. Huberman 



549b. Studio III: Filmmaking (0- 1 8-9). 
See Arts 540. 



Theater Courses 



227a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 

Topics in theater production, history, or literature tailored to the individual student. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Havens 



228a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 



Mr. Havens 



229a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 
See Theater 227. 



Mr. Havens 



301a. Acting I (3-0-3). 

Development of the actor's technique through exercises in body work, concentration, 
creative imagination, sensory perception, and improvisation. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Havens 

302b. Acting II (3-0-3). 

Script analysis, characterization, work on acting roles. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Havens 

430a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in theater production, history, or literature. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

Mr. Havens 



431a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 



Mr. Havens 



1 98 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

432a,b. Special Problems (3-0-3). 
See Theater 430. 

Mr. Havens 



Biochemistry 



Professor K.S. Matthews, Chair 

Professors Olson, Palmer, Rudolph, Schroepfer, and J.B. Walker 

Associate Professors Beckingham, Bennett, and G. N. Phillips 

Assistant Professor Gomer and G. C. King 

Instructor Cooper 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduate biochemistry majors must complete the 
following courses: 

First-year level: Mathematics 101, 102 or 121, 122; Chemistry 101, 102, 
107; Physics 101, 102; Physics 132. 

Second-year level: Mathematics 211,212; Chemistry 211,212,213,214; 
and any advanced physics or mathematics course or Mathematical Sci- 
ences 223 or other approved computer course. 

Advanced level: Biochemistry 36 1 , 362, and 367; Chemistry 3 1 1 , 3 1 2; at 
least 6 semester hours of advanced level biochemistry (Biochemistry 46 1 , 
462, 471, 472, and/or 466); an additional three semester hours of ad- 
vanced chemistry, biology, or biochemistry (300-level or above). For 
double majors, part of the requirement for six hours of advanced bio- 
chemistry may be satisfied by 300-level or above science courses in their 
other major. However, waiver of this requirement must be obtained in 
writing from the undergraduate adviser and the Chair of the Biochemis- 
try Department. 

An undergraduate major in biochemistry must have 48 semester hours in 
courses numbered 300 or higher to obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 129 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Undergraduate majors in biochemistry are encouraged but not required to 
pursue independent supervised research in Biochemistry 40 1 and 402. Concurrent 
registration in Biochemistry 41 1 and a thesis are required. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in the Department requires: 
(1) a bachelor's degree in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, physics, or the 
equivalent; and (2) demonstrated quality and motivation as indicated by the 
student's previous academic record. Graduate Record Examination scores and 
recommendation letters. Although the Department offers an M.A. degree in 



BIOCHEMISTRY 199 

biochemistry, only on rare occasions will a student who does not intend to pursue 
the Ph.D. degree be admitted to the graduate program. Both degree programs 
require the submission of a thesis based on original research work. The advanced 
degree requirements outlined below are those established by the Department of 
Biochemistry and are above and beyond the general requirements of Rice Univer- 
sity for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The student should be familiar with the 
general University regulations and policies for graduate students (listed on pages 
134-136). For further information, interested applicants should contact the De- 
partment Chair. 

A, Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program in Biochemistry. Most of the formal 
course studies will be completed in the first year of residence so that the student 
will commence thesis research at the end of the second semester of residence. The 
course program to be pursued during the first year of residence will be determined 
by the biochemistry graduate student advisory committee in consultation with 
each student. All students are expected to complete the following courses, unless 
equivalent educational experience has been obtained previously: Biochemistry 
501, 502, 517, 561, 562, 566, 572, 575, 583, and 584 (a minimum of 26 hours). 
Students will be responsible for the content of these courses in their Admission to 
Candidacy Examination (see below). Students may also be required to take courses 
in other fields which are fundamental to their education in biochemistry. These 
requirements will be determined by the graduate advisory committee. Most, if not 
all, students will pursue advanced studies in chemistry and biology. Correction of 
any deficiencies in physical chemistry or organic chemistry must be completed 
within the first year of residence. Once the student selects a thesis advisor, the 
individual faculty advisor may require additional course work of a more special- 
ized nature. All such additional courses must be completed prior to the Admission 
to Candidacy Examination. 

Six procedures are used in the evaluation of a graduate student's progress. ( 1 ) 
At the completion of the first two semesters in residence, each student's course 
record, motivation, and general competence will be reviewed at a meeting of the 
entire faculty. A graduate student in biochemistry is required to maintain at least a 
B average to continue in the program. (2) Continual review of research progress 
will be made by the thesis advisor. (3) A written and oral research progress review 
examination will be held each year by three members of the student's Progress 
Review Committee which excludes his or her thesis advisor. (4) All students are 
required to present a research seminar in Biochemistry 581 or 582 at least once a 
year until they have submitted a completed doctoral thesis. (5) An oral Admission 
to Candidacy Examination shall be completed prior to the beginning of the 
student's sixth semester of residence. (6) The final written Ph.D. thesis will be 
reviewed by the student's thesis committee and defended orally in a public 
seminar. A detailed description of these examinations and reviews can be obtained 
from the Departmental office. 

B. Master of Arts Degree Program in Biochemistry. The formal course require- 
ments for a candidate for the Master of Arts degree will be determined by the 
graduate advisory committee. As in the case of Ph.D. candidates, all students will 
be expected to complete the following courses, unless equivalent educational 
experience has been obtained previously: Biochemistry 501, 502, 517, 561, 562, 
566, 572, 575, 583, and 584 (26 hours). In addition to these courses, students will 
be required to take courses in other fields which are fundamental to their education 
in biochemistry or which are required for pursuit of the student's thesis research. 



200 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Students must achieve an overall average of B in the formal courses offered by the 
Department to be a candidate for the M.A. degree. The student's overall perform- 
ance will be evaluated by the faculty as a whole after the second semester in 
residence. 

One progress review session will be held for M.A. students during their second 
full year of residence. This research review session will be identical in format to 
that for the Ph.D. students but, in the case of M.A. students, replaces the admission 
to candidacy examination since no other preliminary examination will be held 
prior to the final oral defense of the Master's thesis. Master of Arts degree 
candidates are required to submit a formal written thesis. The final examination 
will consist of a public oral presentation of the research work to the thesis 
committee members followed by a question and answer session. 



Biochemistry Courses 

201a,b. Independent Study in Biochemistry for Undergraduates(0-TBA-2 each 

semester). 

Independent program of study and research for students with previous training in 
biochemistry. Requires permission of supervising faculty member and the departmental 
chair. 

Ms. Matthews 

361a. General Biochemistry (4-0-4). 

The chemistry, biological functions, and metabolism of molecules in living cells. Topics 
include enzymic catalysis, metabolic control, and energy production and utilization. Prereq- 
uisite: Chemistry 211,212. 

Mr. Olson, Mr. Palmer 

362b. General Biochemistry (4-0-4). 

A continuation of Biochemistry 361a. Topics include nucleic acid structure and func- 
tion, molecular biology, and metabolic regulation. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361. 

Mr. Corner, Mr. Rudolph 

367a,b. Experimental Biochemistry ( 1 -9-4). 

Modem techniques of biochemical investigation: chemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, 
nucleic acids; separation techniques; spectroscopy; measurement and safe handling of 
radioisotopes; enzyme purification and methods of kinetic analysis. Prerequisite: Biochem- 
istry 361. 

Mr. Cooper, Mr. Phillips; Mr. Cooper, Ms. Beckingham 

401a. Undergraduate Research (0- 1 5-5). 

Open only to undergraduate majors with the permission of the research supervisor and 
the chair. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 36 1 , 362, 367, and concurrent enrollment in Biochem- 
istry 411. 

402b. Undergraduate Research (0- 1 5-5). 
See Biochemistry 401. 

41 la. Undergraduate Research Seminar ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

Discussion of current research in area under investigation. Prerequisite: enrollment in 
Biochemistry 40 1 . 

Ms. Matthews 



BIOCHEMISTRY 201 

41 2b. Undergraduate Research Seminar ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

See Biochemistry 41 1. Prerequisite: enrollment in Biochemistry 402. 

Ms. Matthews 

461a. Biochemistry of the Gene (3-0-3). 

A survey of the structure, expression, and regulation of procaryotic and eucaryotic 
genes. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361, 362. 

Mr. Bennett, Ms. Beckingham 

462b. Physical Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

A survey of the application of biophysical techniques to biological problems. Topics 
include: X-ray crystallography, kinetics, magnetic resonance techniques, and enzyme mech- 
anisms. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361. 

Mr. Olson, Mr. Palmer 

466b. Advanced Experimental Biochemistry (1-9-4). 

An advanced laboratory course using modern molecular biological and biophysical 
techniques. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 461, concurrent enrollment in Biochemistry 462, 
and consent of instructor. Limited enrollment. 

Mr. Bennett, Mr. Phillips 

472b. Biochemistry of Antibiotics and Sterols (3-0-3). 

Advanced lectures on current research in certain specialized fields of biochemistry. 
Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361 and completion or concurrent enrollment in Biochemistry 

362. 

Mr. Schroepfer, Mr. Walker 

501a. General Biochemistry for Graduate Students(4-0-4). 

Chemical nature of molecules in living cells and their biological functions; biosynthesis 
and degradation; mechanisms and stereochemistry of enzymic catalysis; metabolic control, 
energy production, and utilization. Prerequisite: graduate status, one year of organic 
chemistry. 

Mr. Olson, Mr. Palmer 

502b. General Biochemistry for Graduate Students(4-0-4). 

A continuation of Biochemistry 501. Topics include molecular biology, gene expres- 
sion, regulation of metabolism, and physiology. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 50\. 

Mr. Gomer, Mr. Rudolph 

517a,b. Experimental Biochemistry ( 1 -9-4). 

Modem techniques of biochemical investigation: chemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, 
nucleic acids; separation techniques; spectroscopy; measurement and safe handling of 
radioisotopes; enzyme purification and methods of kinetic analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status and enrollment in Biochemistry 501 or equivalent. 

Mr. Cooper, Mr. Phillips; Mr. Cooper, Ms. Beckingham 

561a. Biochemistry of the Gene (3-0-3). 

A survey of the expression and regulation of procaryotic and eucaryotic genes. Prerequi- 
site: Biochemistry 501, 502 or equivalent and graduate status. 

Ms. Beckingham. Mr. Bennett 

562b. Physical Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

The application of biophysical techniques to biological problems. Prerequisite: Bio- 
chemistry 501 or equivalent. 

Mr. Olson, Mr. Palmer 



202 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

566b. Advanced Experimental Biochemistry ( 1 -9-3). 

A graduate laboratory course using modern molecular biological and biophysical 
techniques. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 561, concurrent enrollment in Biochemistry 562, 
and consent of instructor. Limited enrollment. 

Mr. Bennett, Mr. Phillips 

572b. Biochemistry of Antibiotics and Sterols (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent. 

Mr. Schroepfer, Mr. Walker 

575a. Introduction to Research (0-3- 1 ). 

Introduction to first-year graduate students of the research programs and laboratories 
of individual faculty members. 

Ms. Matthews 



581a. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1). 

A discussion of selected research topics. 



582b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 
See Biochemistry 581. 



583a. First- Year Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

Presentation of seminars on current biochemical research. 



584b. First- Year Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 
Continuation of Biochemistry 583. 



Ms. Matthews 



Ms. Matthews 



Ms. Matthews 



Ms. Matthews 



611a. Research Seminar (3-0-3). 

Discussion of individual laboratory research. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 800. 

612b. Research Seminar (3-0-3). 
Continuation of Biochemistry 611. 

62 1 a. Thesis Seminar ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

622b. Thesis Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

800a,b. Graduate Research (Variable). 



BIOLOGY 203 

Biology 



Professor Glantz, Chair 

Professors Campbell, F.M. Fisher, Harcombe, Philpott, Sass, C.R. Stewart, 

Subtelny, and C.H. Ward 

Adjunct Professors Brown and Sperling 

Associate Professor J.E. Strassmann 

Adjunct Associate Professor Schroder 

Instructor Knox 

Laboratory Director Caprette 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Biology majors are required to take eight semester 
hours in introductor>' mathematics (Mathematics 101, 102 or 121a, 122b), seven 
semester hours of introductory physics (Physics 101a, 102b, and 132b or 121a, 
1 22b, 1 23a, or 1 24b), eight semester hours of introductory chemistry (Chemistr\' 
101a, 1 02b, and 1 07), eight semester hours of organic chemistry (Chemistry 211a, 
2 1 2b, and 2 1 3a, 2 1 4b), eight semester hours of general biochemistry (Biochemis- 
try 36 1 and 362), and the following courses in biology: Biology 20 1 a, 202b, 203a, 
and 384b. They must take at least six additional advanced biology courses (300- 
level or higher) for a total of 68 semester hours, plus 60 semester hours beyond the 
biology requirements. 

Students interested in research should contact the departmental undergradu- 
ate adviser prior to enrolling in Biology 40 1 a or 40 1 b or 40 1 c and 405a or 405b. 

Students may, under exceptional circumstances, receive credit for research 
done outside of Rice only if they have received in advance the authorization of the 
departmental undergraduate adviser. They should enroll in Biology 403. Either 
Biology 401 or 403 may be taken (but not both) and no more than four semester 
hours may be applied to the requirements for a biology major. 

Students interested in laboratory teaching should contact the laboratory 
instructor prior to enrolling in Biology 402a or 402b. 

Students interested in taking a graduate (500-level) course must obtain the 
consent of the instructor prior to enrollment. 

Either Biology 402 or a 500-level course may be taken (but not both) and no 
more than four semester hours may be applied to the requirements for a biology 
major. 

Premedical. Premedical students who are not majoring in biology are advised 
to take the following courses: Biology 20 1 a, 202b, 203a, and 360b. They may wish 
to take Biology 1 22b for review purposes. 

Biology courses required for distribution requirements. Biology 122a (Funda- 
mental Concepts of Biology) is designed for nonmajors and thus cannot be used for 
biology credit toward a biology major. 

Biology 201a and 202b (Introductory Biology) does not require a prerequisite. 
Biology 311a (Animal Behavior and Evolution) is recommended to students in the 
social sciences. 



204 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Recommended Schedule of Courses. 

First year: Mathematics, physics, and chemistry. 

Second year: Organic chemistry. Biology 201a, 202b, and 

203a. 
Third year: Biochemistry 36 1 a, 362b, and Biology 384b. 

Third and fourth year: Biology advanced electives. 

Biology 203a (Laboratory in Experimental Biology) should be taken in the 
sophomore year and Biology 384b (Laboratory in Advanced Experimental Biolo- 
gy) in the junior year. Students enrolling in these courses should sign up for section 
assignments in Room 141 A Biology at the time of preregistration. 

Transfer credit. Students must complete more than 50 percent of the advanced 
level requirements in their major field at Rice. This is a minimum. 

Transfer credit for no more than 1 4 semester hours taken during the summer 
in an accredited college or university other than Rice is granted if the courses are 
individually acceptable for transfer credit. All transfer students must earn at least 
60 semester hours at Rice, regardless of the amount of transfer credit awarded, and 
spend at least four semesters in residence. 

For more information consult page 84 of this bulletin. Students desiring 
transfer credit for a biology course should contact the undergraduate adviser. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program is open to qualified applicants who 
hold a bachelor's degree or equivalent. Prospective graduate students must take 
the Graduate Record Examination, including the advanced examination in biolo- 
gy. The entering student generally is expected to have a strong background in one 
of the several areas of biology; in addition, completion of courses in physics (one 
year), mathematics (including calculus), chemistry (including organic), and bio- 
chemistry is required. The above requirements do not preclude admission of 
qualified applicants who have majored in areas other than biology. Any deficien- 
cies should be made up no later than the first year of residence in graduate study, 
including the first summer. It is strongly recommended that deficiencies be made 
up during the summer preceding the first semester of residence. An orientation 
examination is administered during the first year. Students entering with the 
master's degree are normally exempt from this examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts 
may be obtained after the completion of 30 semester hours of graduate study, six 
hours of which must be earned by the completion and public defense of a thesis 
embodying the results of an original investigation. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.In addition to the general 
University requirements for advanced degrees (pages 126-132), the following 
departmental requirements must also be met. 

1 . Three or more years of graduate study with at least two years in residence 
at Rice 

2. An original investigation worthy of publication in a scientific journal and 
a doctoral thesis as described in the General Announcements 

3. A grade average of "B" or better in courses taken in the department and 
satisfactory grades in courses taken outside the department 

4. Satisfactory performance in Biology 503 for at least four semesters 

5. Satisfactory performance on a candidacy examination administered by 
the advisory committee; this examination may be oral and/or written 



BIOLOGY 205 

6. Public defense of the thesis 

7. Presentation of a departmental seminar on the candidate's research 

Fellowships. A limited number of graduate fellowships are available on a 
competitive basis. 



Biology Courses 

122a. Fundamental Concepts of Biology (3-0-3). 

A survey for non-majors of the basic principles of cell biology, cell chemistry, metabo- 
lism, genetics, developmental biology, physiology, and population biology. 

Mr. Subtelny 

201a. Introductory Biology (3-0-3). 

Principles of cell biology, cell chemistry, metabolism, evolution, ecology, and organis- 
mic diversity. May be taken either before or after Biology 202. 

Mr. Campbell. Mr. Fisher 

202b. Introductory Biology (3-0-3). 

Principles of Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics, development, physiology, 
and behavior. May be taken either before or after Biology 201. 

Mr. Philpott. Mr. Sass 

203a. Laboratory in Experimental Biology ( 1 -3-2). 

Experimental approaches to the study of morphology, function, and behavior in animal 
systems. Students must sign up for section assignments at time of preregistration. 

Mr. Caprette, Mr. Philpott, Ms. Strassmann, Mr. Subtelny 

302b. Developmental Biology (3-0-3). 

Analysis of processes and principles in development of organisms at the molecular, 
cellular, and tissue level of organizations. Prerequisite: Biology 201, 202 or permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Subtelny 

311a. Animal Behavior and Evolution (3-0-3). 

Evolutionary theory is used to evaluate behavior adaptations of organisms to their 
environment. 

Ms. Strassmann 

313a. Laboratory in Animal Behavior (1-3-2). 

Field and laboratory studies of fireflies, hummingbirds, guppies, and more. Not offered 
every year. Corequisite: Biology 311. 

Ms. Strassmann 

316b. Evolution (3-0-3). 

Principles of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, molec- 
ular evolution, formation of new species, the fossil record, biogeography, and principles of 
classification. 

Mr. Knox 

322a. General Cell Physiology (3-0-3). 

Basic principles and mechanisms of cell physiology. Special emphasis on physical and 
chemical mechanisms of cellular and subcellular processes. Prerequisite: introductory phys- 
ics and chemistry. Corequisite: Biochemistry 361 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Glantz 



206 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

341a. Ecosystem Biology (4-0-4). 

Analysis of population dynamics, species interactions, plant and animal community 
organization, and ecosystem function. 

Mr. Harcombe 

343a. Ecosystem Biology Laboratory ( 1 -3-2). 

Field studies of natural ecosystems. Some Saturday field trips required. Corequisite: 
Biology 34 1 . 

Mr. Harcombe 

350b. Plant Biology (3-0-3). 

Analysis of the physiology, morphology, and evolution of plants in terms of adaptation 
to environment. Normally offered every other year. 

Mr. Harcombe, Mr. Ward 

352b. Laboratory in Plant Biology (1-3-2). 

Field and laboratory studies of plant adaptation to environment. Limited to twenty 
students. Corequisite: Biology 350 or permission of instructor. Normally offered every other 
year. 

Mr. Harcombe 

355a. Animal Biology (3-0-3). 

The evolution and systematics of animals with consideration of their functional mor- 
phology, physiology and behavior. Prerequisite: Biology 201 and 202. 

Mr. Fisher 

360b. Genetics (3-0-4). 

Analysis of the structure, function, and transmission of the genetic material. It is 
recommended that Biology 202 or its equivalent be taken first. 

Mr. Stewart 

381a. Cell Biology (3-0-3). 

The morphology and function of cell components; cells and tissues as revealed by light 
and electron microscopy and associated histo- and cytochemical methods. Prerequisite: 
Biochemistry 361 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Philpott 

384b. Advanced Experimental Biology Laboratory ( 1 -6-3). 

Advanced experimental techniques in electrophysiology, microbiology, cell biology, 
and genetics. Students must sign up for section assignment at time of preregistration. 
Prerequisite: Biology 322 or permission of undergraduate adviser. 

Mr. Caprette 

401a,b,c. Undergraduate Research (Variable). 

Normally limited to senior biology majors with superior academic records. Prerequi- 
site: Permission of undergraduate adviser. Corequisite: Biology 405. 

Mr. Subtelny 

402a,b. Undergraduate Teaching (Variable). 

Normally limited to advanced biology majors with superior academic records. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of laboratory instructor. 

Mr. Subtelny 

403a,b. Special Topics (Variable). 

Used for transfer credit and other special circumstances. Permission of undergraduate 
adviser required. 

Mr. Subtelny 



BIOLOGY 207 

40Sa,b. Research Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

Discussion of contemporary research areas in the biological sciences. Required for 
students enrolled in Biology 401. 

Mr. Stewart 

428b. Endocrinology (3-0-3). 

A study of the primary hormones of vertebrates and the molecular and cellular mecha- 
nisms for their synthesis, secretion, and action. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 36 1 . Biology 38 1 
recommended. 

Mr. Campbell 

471b. Microbiology (3-0-3). 

Structure and function of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Corequisite: 
Biochemistry 361 or consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Williams 

S01a,b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

General departmental seminar. Required of all graduate students. 

Mr. Glantz 

503a,b. Graduate Teaching (3-0-3). 

Supervised instruction in teaching the various areas of biology. Prerequisite: graduate 
standing in biology. 

Mr. Glantz 

511b. Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3). 

A discussion of research literature on topics of current interest. Prerequisite: Biology 
31 1 and permission of instructor. 

Ms. Strassmann 

525b. Concepts in Nervous System Function (3-0-3). 

Current topics in neurobiology. Open to seniors with permission of instructor. 

Mr. Glantz 

533a,b. Special Projects in Developmental Biology(0-6-3). 

Laboratory training in experimental manipulations on developing embryos; supervised 
individual research projects. Prerequisite: Biology 302 and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Subtelny 

534b. Advanced Developmental Biology (3-0-3). 

Seminars on selected topics of current interest in developmental biology. Prerequisite: 
Biology 302 and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Subtelny 

543b. Coastal Biology (3-0-3) 

Student reports, conferences, and field trips. The nearby estuarine and marine environ- 
ments will receive major emphasis. Weekend field trips. Permission of instructor. Limit 10 
students. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Fisher 

547a. Topics in Ecosystem Biology (3-0-3). 

Discussion, seminars, and projects concerning organization, structure, and function of 
ecosystems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mr. Harcombe 



208 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

569b. Topics in Molecular Genetics (3-0-3). 

Student seminars analyzing recent research on a subject of current interest in molecular 
genetics. May be taken by undergraduates who have earned a grade of B or better in either 
Biology 360 or Biochemistry 46 1 or the equivalent. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Stewart 

580b. Cell Biology (2-6-4). 

Study of cells and cell phenomena and interpretation of observations. Advanced 
laboratory and seminar. Prerequisite: Biology 322, 381, Biochemistry 361 and permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Philpott 

582b. Topics in Cell Biology (3-0-3). 

Discussion of recent literature. Prerequisite: Biology 381 and 384 or permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Philpott 

601a,b. Graduate Research (Variable). 

Independent research open to first-year graduate students. 

Mr. Glantz 

800a,b. Thesis Research (Variable). 

Mr. Giant: 



Chemistry 



Professor W. E. Billups, Chair 

Professors Berry, Brooks, Curl, Engel, Fukuyama, Glass, Hayes, Kinsey 

Lewis, Margrave, Parry, Sass, Schroepfer, Smalley, and L. J. Wilson 

Adjunct Professor Willcott 

Associate Professors Weisman and Whitmire 

Adjunct Associate Professor Kasper 

Assistant Professors Burgess, Ciufolini, D'Evelyn, Hutchinson and Hwu 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduates electing chemistry as a inajor are 
expected to take the following courses in their first year: Mathematics 101, 102 (or 
equivalent honors courses); Physics 101, 102 and 132; Chemistry 101, 102 (or 
equivalents), and 105. In general, students take Chemistry 2 1 1, 212, 213, 214 and 
Mathematics 211, 212 (or equivalents) in the sophomore year. Physics 201 and 
202, although not required, are recommended. The Department further requires 
satisfactory completion of the following courses: 

Junior and Senior Years 

Chemistry 311, 312 and 313, 314 

Chemistry 401 and 403 

Chemistry 491, 492 or 493 (at least three semester hours) 

Chemistry 460 or 495 



CHEMISTRY 209 

Two additional courses in advanced chemistry, physics, mathematics, mathe- 
matical sciences, or biochemistry. Students may substitute further undergrad- 
uate research (Chemistry 49 1 , 492, 493) for one or two semesters of classroom 
instruction. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 26 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

American Chemical Society Certification. The Rice Department of Chemistry 
is on the approved list of the Committee on Professional Training of the American 
Chemical Society and as such can certify that graduates have met the appropriate 
standards. For certification, two additional advanced courses are required. Chem- 
istry 460 and 495 are both required; one can be counted as an advanced course. A 
foreign language, preferably German, is recommended. 

Accelerated Ph.D. Plan. Because of the high level of training provided in the 
Rice B.A. program, it is possible for certain especially qualified undergraduate 
students to be admitted to an accelerated program that could lead to the Ph.D. 
degree in about two years after completion of the B.A. program. In order to 
complete the work in this time, the student initiates research during the summer 
following the junior year and continues research by taking Chemistry 491, 492 
during the senior year. The student may start taking cumulative examinations 
during the senior year and should be able to complete all courses and examinations 
before the end of the second year after the B.A. The student may, in favorable 
cases, be able to complete the thesis in this time as well. 

Interdepartmental Majors. An interdepartmental major in chemical physics is 
offered jointly with the Physics Department. Advice about this program should be 
obtained from both departments. Double majors with several other departments, 
such as biochemistry, materials science, physics, and mathematics have also been 
used since the programs have many required courses in common. 

Graduate Program. Students who have completed work equivalent to that 
required for the bachelor's degree in chemistry offered at Rice University may be 
admitted to graduate standing. Preference is normally given to applicants who 
earn high scores on the Graduate Record Examination, including the advanced 
test in chemistry (see page 133). A minimum of two years of graduate study is 
required for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. A nominal amount of undergrad- 
uate teaching is normally considered an integral part of the graduate program. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts are required to complete six one- 
semester courses, present in a thesis the results of a program of research approved 
by the department, and pass a final oral examination; alternatively, admission to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. completes all of the requirements for the Master of Arts. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must complete for publica- 
tion a thesis which represents a distinctly original and significant contribution to 
the field of chemistry. Candidates must further have acquired through course work 
and independent study a broad fundamental knowledge of chemistry in addition 
to those areas of the subject encompassed by their own research interests. Cumula- 
tive examinations for the Ph.D. degree are given periodically, and a final oral 
examination on the thesis is required for all candidates. 



2 1 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Chemistry Courses 

101a. Introductory Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The basic phenomena and principles of chemistry . Normally taken with Chemistry 1 05. 
With Chemistry 1 02, the three courses (or equivalent) are prerequisite to advanced courses in 
chemistry. Prerequisite: high school chemistry. 

Mr. Hutchinson 

102b. Introductory Chemistry (3-0-3). 

See Chemistry 101. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 

Mr. Wilson 

105a,b. Introductory Laboratory in Quantitative Chemistry ( 1 -4-2). 

Laboratory measurements of chemical composition, molecular weights, equilibrium 
constants, heats of reaction, optical spectra, and reaction kinetics using a variety of classical 
and instrumental methods. Normally taken with Chemistry 101, 102. The three courses (or 
equivalent) are prerequisite for advanced courses in chemistry. (One afternoon lab per 
week.) 

Mr. Weisman 

106b. Honors Laboratory (0-4- 1 ). 

Independent projects in synthesis and characterization of compounds. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101, 105, and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Margrave 

211a. Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Aliphatic and aromatic organic chemistry with emphasis on structure, bonding, and 
reaction mechanisms. Second semester has greater emphasis on the chemistry of various 
functional groups. Normally accompanied by Chem 213, 214. Chemistry 212 must be 
preceded by Chemistry 211. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

Mr. Ciufolini 

212b. Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

See Chemistry 211. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211. 

Mr. Engel 

213a. Organic Chemistry Lab (0-4- 1 ). 

Synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds; the techniques and 
practice of organic chemistry. Second semester includes identification of unknown organic 
compounds. (A lecture precedes each lab.) One lab per week. Corequisite: Chemistry 211, 
212. Prerequisite: Chemistry 105. 

Mr. Fukuyama 

214b. Organic Chemistry Lab (0-4-1). 

See Chemistry 2 1 3. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 1 3. 

Mr. Parry 

311a. Physical Chemistry (3-0-3). 

First semester: principles of thermodynamics, including topics of equilibria, theory of 
solutions, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, 212; Physics 101, 102 
(Physics 201, 202 recommended); Chemistry 101, 102. 

Mr. Curl 

312b. Physical Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Elements of quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, kinetic 
theory of gases, reaction kinetics, and properties of liquids and solids. 

Mr. D' Evelyn 



CHEMISTRY 211 

313b. Experimental Physical Chemistry ( 1 -4-2). 

Experiments illustrating techniques employed in high resolution optical spectroscopy, 
electrochemistry, calorimetry, surface area measurements, and kinetics. Lab meets alternate 
weeks. Prerequisite: Chemistry 105, 311; Physics 132. 

Mr. Brooks 

314b. Advanced Instrumental Laboratory (0-8-2). 

Principles and application of modern instrumental methods to inorganic and physical 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 31 1 and 313. 

Mr. Glass 

401a. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The course develops, in detail, the concepts of modern organic chemistry. A major 
portion is devoted to reactions of synthetic importance. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211,212. 

Mr. Billups 

403a. Advanced Organic Laboratory ( 1 -8-2). 

Covers the techniques of modern organic chemistry. Designed to accompany Chemis- 
try 40 1 . Prerequisite: Chemistry 212,213,214. 

Mr. Burgess 

411b. Spectral Methods in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Elucidation of organic structures by physical techniques. Interpretation of infrared, 
ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
Chemistry 401. 

Mr. Fukuyama 

415a. Chemical Kinetics (3-0-3). 

Measurement of reaction rates, phenomenological and theoretical treatment of kinetics 
of simple and chain reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311,312. 

Mr. Brooks 

420b. Statistical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A development of the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics. Applications to 
imperfect gas theory and the calculation of thermodynamic properties of matter. Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 311,312, 430; Mathematics 211,212; Physics 20 1 , 202, or 2 1 1 , 2 1 2. Also 
offered as Chemical Engineering 540. 

Mr. Robert 

430a. Quantum Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Quantum mechanics, atomic structure, the nature of the chemical bond. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 311. 

Mr. Hayes 

445a. Physical-Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Organic reaction mechanisms, substituent and medium effects, linear free energy 
relations and acidity functions. Corequisite: Chemistry 401. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311, 
312. 

iXdr. Lewis 

460b. Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Survey of the periodic table; atomic and molecular structure; bonding in covalent, ionic, 
and electron deficient systems; thermochemical principles and experimental techniques for 
analysis, structure determination, and synthesis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 2 1 3, 2 1 4. 

Mr. Hwu 



2 1 2 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

471b. Molecular Spectroscopy (3-0-3). 

The spectra of simple molecules, including microwave, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, 
and Raman spectra; introductory aspects of molecular symmetry and group theory; 
resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisite; Chemistry 430 or equivalent. 

Mr. Smalley 

491a. Research for Undergraduates (Variable). 

Participation in one of the ongoing research problems. Written report required. 

Staff 

492b. Research for Undergraduates (Variable). 
See Chemistry 49 1 . 

Staff 

493c. Research for Undergraduates (Variable). 
Summer research. 

Staff 

495a. Transition Metal Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Structure, bonding, and reactivity of coordination and organometallic compounds; 
Ligand Field Theory; electronic spectroscopy; magnetism; reaction mechanisms; catalysis. 
Chemistry 460 recommended. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311,312. 

Mr. Whitmire 

541a. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

A variety of courses in advanced organic chemistry. Recent subjects have included 
natural products, photochemistry and photophysics of organic molecules, organic chemistry 
of nonmetals, biosynthesis. Offered irregularly and on demand. 

Mr. Parry 

561a. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Organic mechanisms, modern structure theory, and synthetically important reactions; 
designed primarily for first-year graduate students. 

Mr. Billups 

562b. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 
See Chemistry 561. 

Mr. Burgess 

590b. Surface Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Topics in the chemistry of solid surfaces including surface structure, surface composi- 
tion and gas-surface interactions. 

Mr. D 'Evelyn 

596b. Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

A variety of courses in advanced inorganic chemistry. Recent subjects have included 
fluorine chemistry, boron chemistry, physical methods in inorganic chemistry, radiochemis- 
try, and advanced descriptive inorganic chemistry. 

Mr. Whitmire 

61 la. High Temperature and High Pressure Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The techniques for generation and measurement of high temperature and high pres- 
sures and of the nature of phenomena under extreme conditions. 

Mr. Margrave 

800a,b. Graduate Research (Variable). 

Staff 



CLASSICS 213 

Classics 



Professor Levin 

Associate Professor Wallace 

Assistant Professor Yunis 

Lecturer Eaker 

Degrees Offered: B.A. in Classics (Greek and Latin), B.A. in Latin. 

Undergraduate Program. The program in Classics offers instruction in the 
languages, literature, history, and culture of ancient Greece and Rome. We offer 
two types of major: Classics, which entails the study of both ancient Greek and 
Latin, and Latin. Both majors stress the study of the literature of the classical 
civilizations in the original languages. The student who chooses one of these two 
majors will learn that the study of ancient Greek and Latin is a demanding, but 
rewarding discipline. Both majors can also be pursued as part of a double major, in 
which case the requirements are slightly reduced. For our majors we advise, and 
will try to facilitate, travel to Greece or Italy and experience on a dig or study at the 
Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Rice is now a supporting 
member of the Intercollegiate Center. 

Each year we also offer courses about various aspects of the classical civiliza- 
tions using English translations. These courses are organized below under the 
rubric 'Classical Studies'. All courses offered in the Classics program count to- 
wards the interdisciplinary major entitled Ancient Mediterranean Civilization. 

A major in Classics is essential preparation for graduate study in Classics, 
ancient history, ancient philosophy, ancient religion (especially early Christian- 
ity), and ancient art history. Knowledge of Greek and Latin is useful for graduate 
study in English, the Romance languages, German, the Slavic languages, theology, 
European history, and linguistics. A Secondary Teaching Certificate in conjunc- 
tion with a B.A. in Latin or Classics is available through the department of 
Education. Students seeking a Secondary Teaching Certificate may also offer 
Latin as one of their teaching fields without majoring in Latin. The program in 
Classics is formally administered as part of the department of Spanish, Portu- 
guese, and Classics. Students interested in majoring in Classics or finding out more 
about the program should see Professor Yunis. 

Requirements for the Major. Students may choose a major in either Classics 
(Greek and Latin) or Latin. 

For the major in Classics, the student must take 2 7 semester hours (9 courses): 

1 . 21 semester hours ( 7 courses) in Greek and Latin at the 200 level or above 
including at least 6 semester hours (2 courses) in each language. 

2. 3 semester hours ( 1 course) at the 300 level in Classical Studies or one of 
the following fields from outside the Classics program: Greek and Roman 
history, philosophy, art or religion. 

3. Latin 493 in the spring semester of the senior year, in order to prepare for 
and then take the comprehensive examination in the 9th week of the 
semester. Latin 493 is to be taken in addition to the 21 semester hours 
required above. 

For the major in Latin, the student must take 24 semester hours (8 courses): 



214 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1 . 18 semester hours (6 courses) in Latin at the 200 level or above. 

2. 3 semester hours ( 1 course) at the 300 level in Classical Studies or one of 
the following fields from outside the Classics program: Greek and Roman 
history, philosophy, art or religion. 

3. Latin 493 in the spring semester of the senior year, in order to prepare for 
and then take the comprehensive examination in the 9th week of the 
semester. Latin 493 is to be taken in addition to the 18 semester hours 
required above. 

For Classics (Greek and Latin) or Latin as part of a double major, the student 
must take 2 1 semester hours (7 courses): 

1 . 15 semester hours (5 courses) in Greek and Latin at the 200 level or above. 
The double major in Classics must include at least 6 semester hours (2 
courses) in each language. 

2. 3 semester hours ( 1 course) at the 300 level in Classical Studies or one of 
the following fields from outside the Classics program: Greek and Roman 
history, philosophy, art or religion. 

3. Latin 493 in the spring semester of the senior year, in order to prepare for 
and then take the comprehensive examination in the 9th week of the 
semester. Latin 493 is to be taken in addition to the 15 semester hours 
required above. 

Classical Studies 

211a. Classical Civilization: Greece (3-0-3) 

Introductory survey of the various aspects of ancient Greek culture, including political 
and social history, art and architecture, religion, philosophy, and literature. 

Ms. Wallace 

212b. Classical Civilization: Rome (3-0-3) 

Introductory survey of the various aspects of Roman civilization, including the rise of 
Christianity, political and social history, art and architecture, religion, philosophy, and 
literature. 

Ms. Wallace 

214b. Greek and Latin Elements in English (3-0-3) 

The relationship of English to the classical languages; a systematic guide to understand- 
ing vocabulary and an example of historical and cultural development. Not offered in 1 988- 
89. 

Ms. Eaker 

222b. Perspectives on Greek Tragedy (3-0-3) 

We shall read several crucial works by each of the three great tragedians: Aeschylus' 
Seven against Thebes, and the Oresteia trilogy; Sophocles' Ajax, Philoctetes, and Oedipus at 
Colonus: and Euripides' Hippolytus, Suppliant Women. Heracles, and Orestes. We shall 
attempt to understand the nature of Greek tragedy by considering the civic setting and 
production, the mythological tradition, contemporary philosophical issues, and the poetic 
conventions of the genre. Finally, we shall consider adaptations for the modem stage and 
cinema. Open to all; no prerequisites. 

Mr. Yunis 

335b. Classical Mythology I (3-0-3) 

Survey of Greek myths and their extension to Rome and modern European literature. 
All works are read in English translation. Offered spring, 1 990. 

Mr. Levin 



CLASSICS 215 

336a. Classical Mythology II (3-0-3) 

Continuation oi Classics 335. This course is designed so that the student may enroll 
without having taken Classics 335. Offered fall, 1988 and fall, 1990. 

Mr. Levin 

352b. Periclean Athens (3-0-3) 

A close examination of what was unique about Athens during the age of Pericles: the 
Athenian empire and democracy, the crisis of the Peloponnesian war, the influence of the 
sophists, social crises as reflected in tragedy and comedy, the life and trial of Socrates. 
Offered spring, 1990. 

Mr. Yunis 

491a. Special Topics (3-0-3) 

Independent study for qualified juniors and seniors. 

Staff 

492b. Special Topics (3-0-3) 

Independent study for qualified juniors and seniors. 

Staff 

Greek 

101a. Elementary Greek I (3-0-3) 

Fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar with emphasis on acquisition of reading 
skills. 

Ms. Eaker 

102b. Elementary Greek II (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Greek 101. 

Ms. Eaker 

301a. Intermediate Greek I: Prose (3-0-3) 

Review of forms and syntax followed by readings in Greek prose (Lysias). (To be 
renumbered as Greek 201 after 1988-89.) 

Ms. Eaker 

302b. Intermediate Greek II: Homer (3-0-3) 

Reading of selections from the Odyssey. (To be renumbered as Greek 202 after 1988- 
89.) 

Ms. Wallace 

491a. Directed Reading (3-0-3) 

Independent study in genres and authors not presented in other courses. For qualified 
students only. 

Staff 

492b. Directed Reading (3-0-3) 

Independent study in genres and authors not presented in other courses. For qualified 
students only. 

Staff 

Latin 

101a. Elementary Latin I (3-0-3) 

Fundamentals of Latin grammar with emphasis on acquisition of reading skills. 

Mr. Yunis 



2 1 6 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



102b. Elementary Latin II (3-0-3) 
Continuation of Latin 101. 



201a. Intermediate Latin I: Poetry (3-0-3) 
Review of grammar and reading of Catullus 



202b. Intermediate Latin II: Prose (3-0-3) 

Reading of Roman prose and practice in prose composition. 



301a. Horace (3-0-3) 

Reading of selections from the Epodes, Odes, Satires, and Epistles. 



Ms. Wallace 



Ms. Wallace 



Ms. Eaker 



Mr. Levin 



302b. Tacitus (3-0-3) 

After a brief introduction to Roman historiography, we shall examine the political 
attitudes expressed in the Agricola. Most of the course will be devoted to the methods, aims, 
and techniques of Tacitus as displayed in the Annals. 

Mr. Yunis 

303a. Cicero (3-0-3) 

To be offered fall, 1989. 

Staff 

304b. Lucretius (3-0-3) 

To be offered spring, 1 990. 

Staff 

305a. Virgil (3-0-3) 

To be offered fall, 1990. 

Staff 

306a. Ovid (3-0-3) 

To be offered spring, 1991. 

Staff 

312b. Medieval Latin (3-0-3) 

Readings in medieval Latin prose and poetry. Not open to freshman. Prerequisite: 
Latin 101, 102 or equivalent. Not offered in 1988-89. 

Ms. Eaker 

401a. Horace (3-0-3) 

Enriched version of Latin 301. 

Mr. Levin 

402b. Tacitus (3-0-3) 

Enriched version of Latin 302. 

Mr. Yunis 

491a. Directed Reading (3-0-3) 

Independent study in genres and authors not presented in other courses. For qualified 
students only. 

Staff 



ECONOMICS 217 

492b. Directed Reading (3-0-3) 

Independent study in genres and authors not presented in other courses. For qualified 
students only. 

Staff 

493b. Comprehensive Examination (3-0-3) 

Reading course to be taken by all majors in the spring semester of the senior year. 
Preparation for the comprehensive examination which is to be taken in the ninth week of the 
semester. For Classics majors only. 

Staff 

Economics 



Professor G.W. Smith, Chair 

Professors Brito, Bryant, Huddle, Mieszkowski, Rimlinger, Sickles, 

Soligo and Young 

Associate Professors Brown, Hartley, Hirschey, and 2k)drow 

Adjunct Associate Professors Lairson and Swint 

Assistant Professors Chae, and Strassmann 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduates may major in either economics or 
mathematical economic analysis. 

Economics majors are required to take a minimum often courses including 
nine in Economics plus one in quantitative methods as specified in (5) below. 

Course requirements include: 

1 . Economics 2 1 1 and 2 1 2; 

2. Economics 370 or 372; 

3. Economics 375; 

4. At least three of the following: Economics 301, 355,415, 416, 417, 420, 
430, 435, 436, 438, 440, 445, 448, 450, 455, 461, 483, 485, 486 

5. One course in quantitative methods selected from Economics 350, 400, 
47 1 , 475, 476, Mathematical Sciences 223, 30 1 , 380, 38 1 , 382, 480, 48 1 , 
Computer Science 211, and Accounting 305 or an approved equivalent. 

6. No more than three of the nine Economics courses may be transferred 
from other schools. Additional transfer credits in Economics may count 
toward meeting University graduation requirements but not toward 
fulfillment of the departmental major requirements. The required course 
in quantitative analysis may also be transferred. 

Mathematical economic analysis majors are required to take a minimum of 1 5 
courses, including: 

1 . Economics 211,212,372,375; 

2. At least three of the following: Economics 301, 355, 415, 416, 417, 420, 
430, 435, 436, 438, 440, 445, 448, 450, 455, 461, 480, 483, 485, 486; 

3. Economics 400. 

4. Mathematics 1 1 and 1 02 (or 1 2 1 and 1 22), 2 1 2, either Mathematics 2 1 1 
or 355 or Mathematical Sciences 310, and either Mathematical Sciences 
382 or 480 or 481; 



2 1 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

5. At least one of the following: Economics 440, 471, 472, 475, 476, 477, 
478; Mathematical Sciences 451, 460, 472, 485, 486, 487, 488, or an 
approved equivalent; 

6. At least one research course, with prior approval, selected from: Econom- 
ics 403, 404, 495, 496, or a graduate course. 

7. Students may graduate with "Honors in Economics" by achieving a B+ 
(3.33) average in all Economics courses and writing a senior thesis while 
taking Econ. 403 and 404 (two semesters of independent research). 

The major in Mathematical Economic Analysis is recommended for students 
intending to do graduate work in economics. Additional information regarding 
major requirements can be obtained from the departmental office. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in economics is granted each 
year to a limited number of students who hold an undergraduate degree (or the 
equivalent), whether in economics or another field. The graduate program is 
designed primarily for students qualified to pursue a course of study leading to the 
Ph.D. degree. 

Training in mathematics including at least two semesters in calculus and one 
in linear algebra is a prerequisite for admission to the Ph.D. program. Students 
who have not met these requirements may be admitted to the master's program or 
may take these prerequisites as Class III students. All applicants are required to 
take the Graduate Record Examination. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good undergraduate preparation in 
economics should expect to devote two to two and one-half years to full-time 
course work plus a minimum of one additional year for the completion of the 
dissertation. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Demonstrate proficiency in the use of statistics. 

2. Complete an approved program of at least six courses including at least 
three 500-level graduate courses. A total of 30 semester hours (including 6 
hours for the thesis and 24 for courses), 24 of which must be in residence 
at Rice, is required. Candidates for the master's degree should expect to 
devote a minimum of one year to full-time course work. 

3. Complete and defend orally a thesis presenting in prescribed form the 
results of original research. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Demonstrate proficiency in statistics, elementary mathematical econom- 
ics, and economic history or history of economic thought; 

2. Complete an approved program of at least 1 4 courses. At least two years 
of full-time study, or the equivalent of 60 semester hours, must be in 
residence at Rice. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good under- 
graduate preparation in economics should expect to devote two to two 
and one-half years to full-time course work plus a minimum of one 
additional year for the completion of the dissertation. Completing the 
program in four years is a reasonable goal. 



ECONOMICS 219 

3. Perform satisfactorily on written general examinations in economic 
theory; 

4. Demonstrate proficiency in a major field by: 

a. Taking the relevant courses in that field; 

b. Performing satisfactorily on a written field examination. 

Fields may be chosen from the following areas of interest: (1) 
econometrics, (2) economic development and history, (3) economic 
theory, (4) industrial organization and regulation, (5) international 
trade and finance, (6) macroeconomics/monetary theory, (7) Public 
Finance. 

5. Complete and defend orally a doctoral dissertation setting forth in pub- 
lishable form the results of original research. 



Economics Courses 

211a,b. Principles of Microeconomics (3-0-3). 

Nature of economics; the price system; household decisions; cost and supply; marginal 
productivity and capital theory; industrial organization and control; economic efficiency, 
externalities, and public goods. 

Staff 

212a,b. Principles of Macroeconomics (3-0-3). 

Measurement and determination of national income; money, banking, and fiscal 
policy; business cycles, unemployment, and inflation; inteniational trade and balance of 
payments; other contemporary economic problems. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Staff 

301a. History of Economic Analysis (3-0-3). 

The fundamental ideas of great economic thinkers from Plato to the present. Prerequi- 
site: Economics 211. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Rimlinger 

350a. Elements of Statistical Method ( 3-0-3). 

Basic concepts and techniques in probability theory and statistical inference. A student 
taking Economics 350 may not also receive credit for Mathematical Sciences 280. Prerequi- 
site: Economics 211. 

Mr. Sickles 

355a. Money and Banking (3-0-3). 

Demand and supply of money and other financial assets. American and international 
institutional trends and reforms. 

Staff 

370a,b. Microeconomic Theory (3-0-3). 

Intermediate level analysis of markets, firms, households, income distribution, and 
general equilibrium. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Mr. Zodrow, Mr. Mieszkowski 

372b. Mathematical Microeconomics (3-0-3). 

Mathematical approach to microeconomic theory. Recommended for mathematically 
oriented students. Students may not receive credit for both Economics 370 and 372. 
Prerequisites: Economics 211, Mathematics 101, 102. 

Mr. Brito 



220 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

375a,b. Macroeconomic Theory (3-0-3). 

Intermediate level analysis of relationships between the levels of income, employment, 
interest, investment, consumption, and government spending. Prerequisites: Economics 
211,212. 

Staff 

400b. Econometrics (3-0-3). 

Estimation and forecasting models; topics include multiple regression time series, 
contingency table analysis, and Bayesian inference. Prerequisite: Economics 350 or Mathe- 
matical Sciences 380, 381 or 382. 

Mr. Brown 

403a. Senior Independent Research (3-0-3). 

Independent research project for seniors on an approved topic of their own choosing. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Zodrow 

404b. Senior Independent Research (3-0-3). 
See Economics 403. 

Mr. Zodrow 

415b. Human Resources, Wages, and Welfare (3-0-3). 

Study of labor markets and wage determination. Special emphasis on "investment in 
human capital" through education, training, and health services. Prerequisite: Economics 
211. 

Mr. Huddle 

416. Economic History of the U.S.: 1700-1945 (3-0-3) 

Economic history of the United States from the Colonial Period to the end of World 
War II. Attention focuses upon the trends in per capita income and the forces behind these 
trends. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Rimlinger 

417. Comparative History of Industrialization (3-0-3) 

Comparative historical analysis of industrialization of Western Europe, the United 
States, and Russia from the eighteenth century to World War I. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 
Not offered every year. 

Mr. Rimlinger 

420b. International Economics (3-0-3). 

Economic relationships between countries. Trade theory. Tariffs and other trade 
restrictions. International finance, exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policy. Current 
policy issues in trade and finance. Prerequisites: Economics 211,212, 370 or 372, 375. 

Mr. Smith 

430a. Comparative Economic Systems (3-0-3). 

Theoretical models of various economic systems as a basis for analyzing the operation 
and the institutional characteristics of economies including the U.S., the U.S.S.R., Yugosla- 
via, and China. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Mr. Soligo 

435a. Industrial Organization (3-0-3). 

Market structure, concentration, barriers to entry, and ologopoly pricing. Application 
of micro theory to industry problems. Prerequisite: Economics 211 or permission of 
instructor. 

Ms. Strassmann 



ECONOMICS 221 

436b. Government Regulation of Business (3-0-3). 

Analysis of governmental regulatory activities under antitrust laws and in such regulat- 
ed industries as communications, energy, and transportation. Prerequisite: Economics 211; 
370 and 435 recommended. 

Mr. Johnson 

438b. Economics of the Law (3-0-3). 

The role of economic reasoning in understanding the enactment, interpretation, and 
enforcement of the law. Applications to contracts, property, torts, discrimination, and 
criminal justice. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Mr. Soligo 

440b. Economics of Uncertainty (3-0-3). 

Decision making under uncertainty with applications to the choice of financial assets, 
the operation of insurance markets, research in markets with imperfect information and the 
microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics. Prerequisites: Economics 211,212; Math- 
ematics 101, 1 02 and some familiarity with probability theory as gained in Economics 350, 
Mathematical Sciences 380, 381 or 382. 

Mr. Hartley 

445a. Managerial Economics (3-0-3). 

Application of economics to decision making within the firm; organization theory, cost, 
pricing, and problems of control. Economics 212 desirable. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Mr. Johnson 

448a,b. Corporation Finance (3-0-3). 

Financial analysis, planning, and control in modern corporations; includes valuation, 
cost and allocation of capital, capital markets. Prerequisites: Economics 2 1 1 and Accounting 
305. 

Staff 

450a. World Economic and Social Development (3-0-3). 

Examines past and future development in advanced and poor countries emphasizing 
resources, population, entrepreneurship, education, and planning. Prerequisites: Economics 
211,212. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Huddle 

455b. Money and Financial Markets (3-0-3). 

Determinants of the demand and supply of money, bonds, stocks, and other financial 
assets. Financial intermediaries. Monetary policy. Inflation. International linkages of finan- 
cial markets. Prerequisite: Economics 375. 

Mr. Bryant 

461b. Urban Economics (3-0-3). 

Economic analysis of the development and problems of urban areas with particular 
attention to current policy issues. Prerequisite: Economics 211 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Mieszkowski 

471a. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method; revised simplex 
method; dualilty theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition tech- 
niques. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 47 1 . 

Mr. Bixby 

472a. Introduction to Game Theory (3-0-3). 

Solution concepts for different games: strategic form game, coalition form game and 
extensive form game. Elementary application to economics and political science. 

Mr. Chae 



222 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

475a. Operations Research, Deterministic Models (3-0-3). 

Optimization problems in a managerial and economic context. Familiarity with linear 
programing and microeconomic theory is strongly recommended. Also offered as Mathemat- 
ical Sciences 475. 

Staff 

476b. Operations Research, Stochastic Models (3-0-3). 

Decision theory, waiting line theory, Markov chains, inventory models, replacement 
models, simulation. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 380 or 38 1 . Also offered as Mathe- 
matical Sciences 476. 

Mr. Pfeiffer 

411. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory 1(3-0-3) 

Competitive economics from a mathematical prespective, unifying calculus, matrix 
algebra, and set-theoretic approaches. Theories of household, firm; production models. 
Prerequisite: Economics 211, Mathematics 212, Mathematical Sciences 3 1 0. Also offered as 
Mathematical Sciences 477. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

478. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory II (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Economics 477, which is prerequisite. Also offered as Mathematical 
Sciences 478. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

483a. Public Finance (3-0-3). 

Tax and expenditure policies at the federal, state, and local levels; emphasizes resource 
allocation and equity and current tax reform issues. Prerequisite: Economics 211. 

Mr. Zodrow 

48Sa,486b. Contemporary Economic Issues (3-0-3 semester). 

Analysis of urgent and significant economic problems. Emphasis on the evaluation of 
policy remedies. Principal topics vary from year to year. 

Staff 

495a,496b. Senior Seminar (3-0-3 semester). 

Reading and discussion of topics in advanced economics. Open to seniors with special 
approval. 

Staff 

500a,b. Master's Thesis Research (Variable). 

Research on an approved topic in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
master's degree. 

Staff 

501a. Microeconomic Theory I (3-6-5). 

Theory of the firm, the theory of consumer behavior, duopoly, bilateral monopoly, 
imperfect competition, capital theory, and the theory of income distribution. 

Mr. Brito 

502a. Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (3-6-5). 

Macroeconomic theory of output, consumption, investment, interest rates, inflation, 
and employment. 

Mr. Hartley 

504b. Advanced Economic Statistics (3-6-5). 

Statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses multiple and partial correlation 
analysis; analysis of variance and regression. 

Mr. Sickles 



ECONOMICS 223 

505b. Monetary Theory (3-6-5). 

More detailed discussion of selective macroeconomic and monetary topics. 

Mr. Bryant 

506b. Topics in Macroeconomics (3-6-5). 

Selected topics of current interest. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to 
active research issues and methods to the neoclassical school. 

Mr. Hartley 

507a. Mathematical Economics (4-0-5). 

Theory of household, firm; activity analysis; set theory, matrix algebra, vector calculus, 
metric spaces, separation theory, constrained optimization. 

Mr. Young 

508b. Mathematical Economics II (4-0-5). 

Continuation of Economics 507. Set theoretic approach to general equilibrium; aggre- 
gate linear and nonlinear production models; existence, stability, optimality. 

Mr. Chae 

510a. Econometrics I (3-6-5). 

Estimation and inference in single equation regression models, multicollinearity, 
autocorrelated and heteroskedastic disturbances, distributed lags, asymptotic theory, and 
maximum likelihood techniques. Emphasis is placed on the ability to analyze critically the 
literature. Prerequisite: Economics 504. 

Mr. Brown 

511b. Econometrics II (3-6-5). 

Topics in linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations estimation, including qualita- 
tive and categorical dependent variables models and duration analysis. Applied exercises use 
SAS and the Wharton Quarterly Econometric Model. Prerequisite: Economics 510. 

Mr. Sickles 

512. International Trade Theory (3-6-5). 

Classical, neoclassical, and modern trade theory; some welfare aspects of trade, includ- 
ing the theory of commercial policy. Applications are emphasized. 

Mr. Smith 

514. Industrial Organizations and Control (3-6-5). 
Industrial markets and public policy. 

Staff 

515. Labor Economics (3-6-5). 

The economics of the labor market and the economic implication of trade unions. 
Attention is given to major public policy issues. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

516. Economic History and Development (3-6-5). 

Historical analysis of economic growth and industrialization of the U.S., Western 
Europe, and Russia in the last 1 50 years. Stresses conditions which favored or retarded 
growth. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Rimlinger 

517. History of Economic Analysis (3-6-5). 

The development of economic analysis from the scholastics to the neoclassical school. 

Mr. Rimlinger 



224 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

518. International Finance (3-6-5). 

International monetary problems, foreign exchange theory, international investments. 

Mr. Hartley 

519. Economic Growth and Development (3-6-5). 

Analysis of theory and policy questions relating to the level and rate of economic 
development. 

Mr. Soligo 

521. Public Finance I (3-6-5). 

Theory of public goods and externalities, poliltical mechanisms and public choice, 
theory of local public goods, cost-benefit analysis and project evaluation issues of income 
redistribution. 

Mr. Mieszkowski 

522. Public Finance II (3-6-5). 

Effects of taxation on individual and firm behavior, general equilibrium tax incidence 
analysis, optimal taxation theory, optimal implementation of tax reform, analysis of compre- 
hensive income and consumption taxes. 

Mr. Zodrow 

523. Optimization and Capital Theory (3-6-5). 
Dynamics, capital theory and intertemporal optimization. 

Mr. Brito 

530. Comparative Economic Systems (3-6-5). 

Analysis of theoretical models of market and centrally planned economics; national 
economic systems of the Soviet Union, China, Yugoslavia, Western European countries, and 
the United States. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Soligo 

536b. Government Regulation of Industry (3-6-5). 

Advanced analysis of the economics of antitrust and other forms of regulation. Not 
offered every year. 

Staff 

561. Urban Economics (3-6-5). 

Analysis of urban development and such urban problems as housing, land use, transpor- 
tation, discrimination, and pollution. 

Mr. Mieszkowski 

565. Health Economics (3-6-5). 

Economic aspects of health; production, cost, demand and supply factors; methods of 
payment and effects of regulation. 

Mr. Lairson, Mr. Swint 

573. Nonlinear Programming (3-0-3). 

Theory and computational methods for nonlinear programming, including: Kuhn- 
Tucker conditions, duality theory, methods for constrained optimization of convex and 
nonconvex problems. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 573. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Young 

577. Topics in Economic Theory I (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced economic theory. Prerequisite: Economics 508. Not offered 
every year. 

Mr. Chae 



EDUCATION 225 

578. Topics in Economic Theory II (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced economic theory. Prerequisite: Economics 508. Not offered 
every year. 

579. Topics in Economic Theory III (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in advanced economic theory. Prerequisite: Economics 508. Not offered 
every year. 

591a, 592b. Topics in Policy and Applied Economics (3-6-5 each semester). 

Staff 

593a. Workshop in Econometrics (3-0-3). 

The course is designed to expose graduate students to advanced topics in applied and 
theoretical econometrics through guest lectures by leading researchers in the field. Students 
participating in the seminar are expected to prepare, over the course of the year, a research 
paper and present it in the workshop. 

Mr. Brown 

594b. Workshop in Econometrics (3-0-3). 

The course is designed to expose graduate students to advanced topics in applied and 
theoretical econometrics through guest lectures by leading researchers in the field. Students 
participating in the seminar are expected to prepare, over the course of the year, a research 
paper and present it in the workshop. 

Mr. Brown 

595a. Readings in Advanced Topics (3-0-3). 

Staff 

596b. Readings in Advanced Topics (3-0-3). 

Staff 

800a,b,c. Graduate Research (Variable). 

Staff 

Education 



Associate Professor L. McNeil, Chair 

Associate Professor J.D. Austin 

Assistant Professor D. Shirley 

Lecturer R. Duke 

Degrees Offered: Secondai7 Teaching Certificate in conjunction with B.A. in 
major field; Master of Arts in Teaching 

Teacher Education and Certification. Rice University seeks to contribute 
graduates to society able to think and to question, educated to comprehend and to 
cope with a rapidly changing world. Although professional instruction is not the 
primary ingredient of undergraduate education, the University's role in preparing 
students for their future life work cannot be ignored. While maintaining complete 
institutional integrity, Rice University supports the intention as well as the letter 
of regulations promulgated by the state governing the development and presenta- 
tion of teacher preparation and certification programs. 



226 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

To this end, the Rice University Department of Education closely cooperates 
with departments offering work in subject matter fields. It is the function of this 
department to provide rigorous professional courses and to administer the estab- 
lished teacher education programs. 

The Rice University teacher education program strives to fit the prospective 
teacher to perform all the roles which may be expected of a teacher. To accomplish 
this objective, it gives sustained close attention to the following vitally interrelated 
components: 

1 . A sound liberal or general education. 

2. An extended knowledge of the subject(s) or area(s) to be taught. 

3. Professional knowledge (i.e., relevant historical, philosophical, social, 
and psychological material). 

4. Skills in classroom teaching, in working with children and adults, and in 
supervising the learning process. 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Students who have satisfied the 
following requirements may apply to the Rice University Teacher Education 
Council for admission to the teacher education program: 

1 . Junior standing at Rice University. 

2. A grade of "C" or better in all semester hours attempted in applicant's 
teaching rield(s). 

3. Evidence of satisfactory speech patterns. 

4. Evidence of adequate physical vigor and strength, and absence of obvious 
physical conditions which might interfere materially with performance 
as a teacher in a classroom. 

5. Approval of a completed Teacher Certification Program form by the 
appropriate departmental representatives and the Teacher Education 
Council prior to registration for the junior year. 

6. Satisfactory scores on all preprofessional skills tests. 

Requirements for a Texas Provisional Teaching Certificate (Grades 7-12). Rice 
University is approved by the State of Texas to offer teacher preparation programs 
in the following fields: art, biology, chemistry, earth science, economics, English, 
French, German, health education, history, Latin, mathematics or mathematical 
sciences, physical education, physics, political science, psychology, Russian, gen- 
eral science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. 

After satisfactory completion of the Rice University teacher education pro- 
gram, the student will be recommended for a Texas teaching credential. The Texas 
Education Agency will then award the student a Texas Provisional Teaching 
Certificate, Grades 7-12. 

The Rice University teacher preparatory program requires the following: 

1 . A bachelor's degree. 

2. Foundations in Arts and Sciences (recommended to be completed during 
the freshman and sophomore years): 

English, 1 2 semester hours; 

American history, six semester hours, 

(History 211 and 212); 

Government, 3 semester hours (Political Science 210); and 

University distribution requirements. 



EDUCATION 227 

3. Academic Specialization: (A student selects one of the following plans): 
Plan I. Preparation to teach one field: At least 36 hours in field with 

at least 2 1 semester hours of advanced work. All courses 
must be approved by the Rice Teacher Education council. 

Plan II. Preparation to teach two fields: At least 24 semester hours in 
each field with 12 semester hours of advanced work in each 
field. Courses must be approved by the Rice Teacher 
Education Council. 

Plan III. Preparation to teach related fields: At least 48 semester 

hours in a composite field (general science or social studies) 
with at least 18 semester hours of advanced work. Courses 
must be approved by the Rice Teacher Education Council. 

4. Professional Education: 1 8 semester hours consisting of the following. 
Education 311,312, 409, 3 semester hours in Seminar in Teaching (e.g., 
304 and 404, 304 and 402, only 410, only 416), and 6 hours in student 
teaching (Principles of Teaching). 

Supervised Teaching Experience. Either of two plans may be followed by 
teacher education candidates. 

1. Apprenticeship Plan (Plan A): 

Prerequisite: Education 304, 311, 312. 

Apprenticeship is designed for students who wish to complete prepa- 
ration for their teaching careers in four years and two six-week summer 
sessions. Candidates will enroll for the summer session following their 
junior year. The apprentice will assist and teach under the supervision of 
a master teacher and University faculty in the Rice Summer School for 
High School Students. 

Education 409 and a 400-level course. Seminar in Teaching, are to be 
completed during the senior year. 

Following graduation from Rice, the apprentice will again teach in 
the Rice Summer School for High School Students under the supervision 
of a master teacher and University faculty. The apprentice is not remu- 
nerated for teaching either summer. He or she is recommended for the 
Texas Provisional Teacher's Certificate following successful completion 
of the second summer and state Excet tests. 

2. Internship Plan (Plan B): 

Prerequisite: completion of all course work except student teaching. 

Under this plan, students are expected to attend a six-week summer 
session immediately following their graduation from Rice. Each intern 
will observe and teach classes under the supervision of a master teacher 
and University faculty in the Rice Summer School for High School 
Students. During the following fall semester, interns will teach in a 
neighboring school system. Such placement will be subject to the availa- 
bility of openings in the intern's teaching field(s). 

The intern will be employed for full-time duty and will teach under the 
supervision of a member of the cooperating school system and a faculty 
member from the University. During the half year of service, the intern 
will be paid a salary commensurate with the salary being paid a full-time 



228 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

teacher with a degree and an emergency teaching permit by the cooperat- 
ing school system. Upon successful completion of the internship semester 
and upon the recommendation of the secondary school principal, the 
intern will offered a regular teaching contract for the spring semester if a 
suitable vacancy exists. He or she will be recommended for a Texas 
Provisional Teacher's Certificate after successful completion of state 
Excet tests. 

Program for the Master of Arts in Teaching. Most candidates entering the 
program will have had no professional education courses. During the program, 
candidates usually fulfill all requirements for a Texas Provisional Teaching Certif- 
icate. The program consists of the following components: 

1. Courses in secondary school educational theory, teaching strategies, 
educational objectives, and evaluation. 

2. Graduate and upper division courses in the candidate's two subject 
matter teaching fields and/or related fields. 

3. Supervised full-time teaching in the Rice Summer School for High School 
Students for two summers. Candidates will be responsible for the design 
and implementation of courses, for teaching, and for evaluation. 

4. Supervised teaching internship for one semester in a cooperating public 
school system. (With the approval of the Department of Education a 
second semester internship may be substituted for the second summer of 
student teaching.) 

Candidates with a valid secondary teaching certificate maybe exempted from 
the professional education courses and the second summer of student teaching. 

Normally, the degree program will consist of 1 1 semester courses. However, 
some candidates may need to remove deficiencies for certification and may 
therefore require additional courses. 

Students in the program will not normally be eligible for Rice Graduate 
Fellowships or scholarship support since the cooperating school districts pay a 
salary for internship teaching. However, a limited number of tuition waivers is 
available. 

Please refer to page 1 33 for additional information regarding admission to the 
graduate program in education. 



Education Courses 

304b. Seminar in Teaching ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

A study of procedures, materials, and theoretical foundations of teaching various 
subject areas. Preparation of resource units, orientation to secondary school teaching. 
(Section 1, mathematics education; section 2, science education; section 3, English educa- 
tion; section 4, social studies education; section 5, physical education; section 6, art educa- 
tion; section 7, foreign language education.) (Junior-level apprentice teachers only.) Prereq- 
uisite: Education 311. 

Mr. Austin, Ms. McNeil, Staff 



EDUCATION 229 

311a. The Historical and Philosophical Foundation of Education (3-0-3). 

Analysis of the historical, cultural and philosophical bases of schooling, with special 
emphasis on curriculum theory and practice. Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Those 
intending to complete Rice teacher certification program, add these prerequisites: History 
211,212 and filing of Teacher Certification Plan. 

Mr. Austin, Ms. McNeil. Staff 

312b. Psychology of Human Learning (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theoretical systems of human learning with emphasis on implications 
for secondary education; introductory tests and measurements. 

Mr. Austin, Staff 

400b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Apprentice English teachers only.) Prerequisites: Education 304, 409. 

Ms. McNeil 

402b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Apprentice social studies teachers only.) Prerequisites: Education 304, 409. 

Staff 

404b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Section 1, apprentice teachers in mathematics education only; section 2, apprentice 
teachers in science education only.) Prerequisites: Education 304, 409. 

Mr. Austin, Staff 

406b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Apprentice health and physical education teachers only.) Prerequisites: Education 
304, 409. 

Staff 

407b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Apprentice art teachers only.) Prerequisites: Education 304, 409. 

Staff 

408b. Seminar in Teaching (2-0-2). 

(Apprentice foreign language teachers only.) Prerequisites: Education 304. 409. 

Ms. McNeil 

409a. Fundamentals of Secondary Education (3-0-3). 

Background, purposes, and organization of modern secondary education curriculum 
and current trends in administration of secondary schools. Introductory educational 
research. 

Staff 

410b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

(English teachers only.) Same as Education 304. Students with credit in Education 304 
may not enroll. Prerequisite: Education 311, 409. 

Ms. McNeil 

412b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

(Social studies teachers only.) Same as Education 304. Students with credit in Educa- 
tion 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Education 311, 409. 

Staff 



230 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

414b. Seminar in Teacliing (3-0-3). 

(Section 1, mathematics education; section 2, science education.) Same as Education 
304. Students with credit in Education 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Education 311, 
409. 

Mr. Austin, Staff 

416b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

(Health and physical education teachers only.) Same as Education 304. Students with 
credit in Education 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Education 311, 409. 

Staff 

417b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

(Art teachers only.) Same as Education 304. Students with credit in Education 304 may 
not enroll. Prerequisites: Education 311, 409. 

Staff 

418b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

(Foreign language teachers only.) Same as Education 304. Students with credit in 
Education 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Education 311, 409. 

Ms. McNeil 

4l9a,b. Principles of Teaching (3-0-3). 

Introduction to teaching in the secondary school and supervised teaching, with accom- 
panying seminar. 

Staff 

491a,b. Independent Study and Research (3-0-3). 
Enrollment by consent of instructor. 

Staff 

519a,b. Principles of Teaching (3-0-3). 

Introduction to teaching in the secondary school and supervised teaching, with accom- 
panying seminar. 

Staff 

590c. Contemporary Topics in Secondary School Mathematics (6-0-6). 

Selected topics in secondary school mathematics. Offered in summers as needed. 
Enrollment by consent of instructor. 

Mr. Austin 

591a,b. Independent Study and Research (3-0-3). 
Enrollment by consent of instructor. 

Staff 

595c. Contemporary Topics in Secondary School Science and Mathematics 

(3-0-3). 

Offered in summers as needed. Enrollment by consent of instructor. 

Mr. Austin 



ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE 23 1 

Engineering and Applied Science 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Rice's engineering programs have been prominent since the early days of the 
University. Seven departments, each of which is strong in teaching and research, 
now comprise the George R. Brown School of Engineering. The school was 
dedicated in 1975 at ceremonies honoring the distinguished Rice alumnus, trus- 
tee, and benefactor who was a founding partner in Brown & Root, Inc. 

B.S. programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET) in chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engi- 
neering, mechanical engineering, and materials science and engineering. 

General Undergraduate Information. Curricula in engineering at Rice Univer- 
sity lead to either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees in the fields of 
chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical and computer engineering, 
mechanical engineering, and in materials science and engineering. In computer 
science and in mathematical sciences, curricula lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
These curricula may also be used as part of integrated five-year programs that lead 
to professional master's degrees in each of the above fields and in environmental 
science or environmental engineering. 

A student taking the B.A. program is required to pass a total of at least 120 
semester hours (40 courses). The major department may require no more than 80 
specific semester hours for the major and may require fewer. Students must 
complete at least 60 semester hours in addition to the departmental major require- 
ments. Some departments require more than 120 hours for graduation. 

A student following a B.S. program in engineering (other than chemical 
engineering) must pass a total of at least 1 34 semester hours ( 1 37 semester hours 
for chemical engineering). Except for chemical engineering, which may require up 
to 1 04 semester hours in specific course requirements, no department may require 
more than 92 semester hours in specific courses for the B.S. degree. 

Each student should get a list of required courses from the appropriate 
department. First- and second-year students should have their programs approved 
each semester by an engineering adviser as well as by their college adviser. Before 
registering for the junior year, students must associate themselves with an adviser 
in the department of their major and have the choice of major approved. Registra- 
tion for every semester thereafter must be approved by an adviser in the major 
department. 

The undergraduate courses listed below are offered for the preparation of 
students majoring in all branches of engineering. 

Engineering Courses 

200b. Classical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Fundamental exposition of the laws of classical thermodynamics and deductions 
therefrom. Applications illustrated with particular attention to pure substances. Prerequi- 
site: Physics 101, 102. 

Mr. Cohen 



232 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

211a. Engineering Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Equilibrium of static systems, dynamics of a particle, dynamics of particle systems, and 
rigid-body dynamics. Elements of vibrational analysis. Prerequisite: Physics 101, 102, 
Mathematics 101, 102. 

Staff 

241a,b. Electrical Circuits (3-3-4). 

Basic circuit elements, mesh and node analysis, Thevenin and Norton equivalent 
circuits, controlled sources and op-amps solution of circuits, differential equations, use of 
phasors and impedance for sinusoidal AC analaysis, frequency response. Laboratory on 
basic electrical measurements. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 102 or equivalent. 

Staff 



Chemical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor L. V, Mclntire, Chair 

Professors Akers, Armeniades, Davis, Dyson, Heliums, 

Hightower, Kobayashi, and C. A. Miller 

Adjunct Professor G. D. Fisher 

Associate Professors Robert and Zygourakis 

Adjunct Associate Professor W. House 

Assistant Professors Glacken, San, and Shanks 

Adjunct Assistant Professor L. C. Moorhead 

Lecturer Hirasaki 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate curriculum in chemical engi- 
neering is designed to provide a sound scientific and technical basis for further 
professional development. Concurrently, the student has the opportunity to con- 
centrate on a particular technical specialty such as applied mathematics, biomedi- 
cal engineering, biotechnology, environmental quality, kinetics and catalysis, 
engineering economics, petroleum production, solid state materials, or polymer 
science and engineering. 

In the four-year curriculum, a student may qualify for either the Bachelor of 
Arts degree or the Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts program is 
highly flexible and allows a student to pursue other areas of interest with or without 
a double major. The Bachelor of Science program has a higher content of required 
scientific and professional courses. On completion of either bachelor's program, a 
student is eligible to apply for a fifth year of specialized study leading to the degree 
of Master of Chemical Engineering. The curriculum is designed so that outstand- 
ing students interested in careers in research and teaching may enter graduate 
school after either bachelor's degree. 

The Department of Chemical Engineering requires 78 semester hours in the 
major for the B.A. degree, prerequisites and laboratory courses included. In 
addition to these requirements, students must also satisfy the distribution require- 
ments and complete no fewer than 59 semester hours outside the departmental 
requirements for a total of at least 137 semester hours. 



ENGINEERING/CHEMICAL 233 

The B.S. degree is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology. Students enrolled in the B.S. program must take: 

Chemistry 101, 102, 107, 211,212, 213, 214, 31 1, 312, 313; 

Chemical Engineering 301, 302, 344, 370, 390, 401, 402, 403, 404, 411, 

412,443,444; 
Mathematics 101, 1 02, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 or equivalent honors courses; 
Mathematical Sciences 340 or 38 1 ; 
Physics 101, 102, and 132; 

Computing requirements: four hours of Mathematical Sciences 223; 
Engineering 211; 

An approved basic science course; 
Two courses selected from Engineering 24 1 , Materials Science 30 1 , and 

Civil Engineering 300. 

In addition to these courses, students must satisfy the distribution require- 
ments and complete sufficient courses outside the departmental requirements for 
a total of at least 137 semester hours. A specific B.A. option in biochemical 
engineering is available. 

Graduate Program, Graduate study in chemical engineering can lead to the 
Master of Chemical Engineering, the Master of Science, or the Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. University requirements for the professional degree M.Ch.E. are given on 
page 1 29. The Department requires that at least six of the courses taken must be at 
the advanced level in chemical engineering. In addition, four semesters of chemi- 
cal engineering design, a computer science course, and an approved mathematics 
course must have been taken some time in the student's curriculum. Suggested 
course combinations are available with emphasis in the areas of biochemical 
engineering, petroleum engineering, and electronics materials. 

University requirements for the research degrees M.S. and Ph.D. are outlined 
on pages 126-127. 

Candidates for the Master of Science degree are required to complete a 
minimum of 18 approved semester hours with high standing. They must also 
submit an original research thesis and defend it in a public oral examination. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must demonstrate compe- 
tence in the areas of applied mathematics, thermodynamics, transport processes, 
and chemical kinetics and reactor design by passing qualifying examinations, 
normally during the first year of study. They must also complete a minimum of 36 
approved semester hours with high standing and submit a thesis that provides 
evidence of their ability to carry out original research in a specialized area of 
chemical engineering. With departmental approval, the course requirements may 
be reduced to 24 hours for students already having an M.S. degree. The thesis must 
be defended in a public oral examination. 

Prerequisites for Undergraduate Chemical Engineering 

Courses 



Course Prerequisites 

Ceng 30 1 Math 1 1 , 1 02; Chem 1 1 , 1 02; 1 hr credit in Masc 223 (APL) 



234 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Ceng 302 Ceng 30 1 ; Masc 223; co-requisite Math 2 1 2 

Ceng370 Ceng 301, 302; Math 21 1, 212; Phys 101, 102 

Ceng 390 Ceng 30 1 ; Math 211,212; co-/pre-requisite Chem 311, Ceng 344 

Ceng 40 1 Phys 1 1 , 1 02; Ceng 302; Chem 311,312; Math 38 1 or Masc 340 

Ceng 402 Ceng 401 

Ceng 403 Phys 1 1 , 1 02; Math 211,212; Ceng 302, 390; co-Zpre-requisite 

Engi 211, Ceng 370 
Ceng 404 Ceng 370, 390, 40 1 , 403, and 4 1 1 

Ceng 4 1 1 Math 38 1 or Masc 340; Chem 311,312 

Ceng 412 Ceng 411 

Note: With the written consent of the instructor, a student may register for a 
course without having completed the required prerequisite(s), but such consent 
can be expected only in unusual circumstances and will not carry forward. For 
example, if the instructor for Chemical Engineering 4 1 1 waives Chemistry 3 1 1 for 
a person, then the person upon completing Chemical Engineering 4 1 1 may not 
proceed to Chemical Engineering 4 1 2 without the consent of that instructor since 
Chemistry 311 is an implied prerequisite for Chemical Engineering 412. 



Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Courses 

301a. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals (3-0-3). 

Use of basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermody- 
namic properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for steady and unsteady 
state systems. Required for sophomores intending to major in chemical engineering. 

Mr. Davis 

302b. Separation Processes (3-0-3). 

Systematic treatment of single and multistage contacting operations involving binary 
and multicomponent systems. Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 301. 

Mr. Dyson 

343a. Chemical Engineering Laboratory ( 1-3-2). 

Experiments demonstrating the principles presented in Chemical Engineering 301, 
302, 390. 

Mr. Hightower 

370b. Process Dynamics and Control (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of complex variables. Modeling of dynamic processes. Response of 
uncontrolled systems. Transfer functions. Feedback controllers. Response and stability of 
controlled systems. Frequency response and Nyquist Stability Criterion. Design of feedback 
controllers. Cascade feedforward and multivariable control systems. Introduction to digital 
computer control. Students will use simulators for designating feedback controllers and 
experiment with a laboratory computer control system. 

Mr. San, Mr. Zygourakis 

390a. Kinetics and Reactor Design (3-0-3). 

Principles and significance of chemical kinetics; procedures for evaluating kinetic 
parameters from reaction rate data; application of these methods to design and predict the 
performance of various types of ideal and nonideal chemical reactors in both homogeneous 
and heterogenous systems. 

Mr. Hightower 



ENGINEERING/CHEMICAL 235 

401a. Introduction to Transport Phenomena (3-0-3). 

Fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to the contin- 
uum; analysis of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum equations. Prerequi- 
site: Chemical Engineering 302 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Mclntire 

402b. Introduction to Transport Phenomena (3-0-3). 
Continuation of Chemical Engineering 401. 

Mr. Heliums 

403b. Equipment Design I (3-3-4). 

Introduction to macroscopic balances in fluid flow. Pipe flow, centrifugal pump opera- 
tion and control valves. Design of fluid flow equipment and piping networks. Materal 
selection and corrosion. Design of solid-liquid separation equipment. 

Mr. Glacken 

404b. Equipment Design II (3-3-4). 

Optimal design of chemical reactors and heat exchange equipment; industrial economic 
principles. Special process design projects in small groups. 

Mr. Anneniades 

411a. Fundamentals of Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Development and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. 

Mr. Miller 

412b. Thermodynamics II (3-0-3). 

Advanced treatment of chemical and physical equilibrium in multicomponent systems. 
Detailed study of nonideal solutions. 

Mr. Robert 

443a. Chemical Engineering Laboratory ( 1 -3-2). 

Experiments demonstrating transport coefficient measurement, forced and free con- 
vection transfer operations, and thermodynamic principles as covered in Chemical Engi- 
neering 40 1 , 402, 4 1 1 . 

Mr. Dyson 

444b. Chemical Engineering Laboratory (1-3-2). 
Same as Chemical Engineering 443. 

Mr. Dyson 

483a. Undergraduate Research (Variable). 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in modern chemical engineer- 
ing research under the direction of a selected faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the 
department. 

Mr. Hightower 

484b. Undergraduate Research (Variable). 
Same as Chemical Engineering 483. 

Mr. Hightower 

501a. Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes (3-0-3). 

Advanced study in fluid mechanics and transport processes including analytical and 
numerical approximation methods, boundary layer theory, and hydrodynamic stability. 

Mr. Heliums 



236 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

503a. Chemical Engineering Processes I (2-3-3). 

Synthesis course applying the principles of staged processes, transport phenomena, 
kinetics, and economics to te simulation, design, and operation of equipment and processes. 

Mr. Akers 

504b. Chemical Engineering Processes II (2-3-3). 

Continuation of Chemical Engineering 503, with emphasis on the use of available 
process design computer programs. 

Mr. Kobayashi 

540b. Statistical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A development of the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics. Applications to 
imperfect gas theory and the calculation of thermodynamic properties of matter. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 311,312, 430; Mathematics 211,212; Physics 20 1 , 202 or 2 1 1 , 2 1 2. Also 
offered as Chem 420. 

Mr. Robert 

571a. Reservoir Engineering (3-0-3). 

Basic reservoir engineering principles-single and two phase flow in porous media. 

Mr. Miller 

580b. Biochemical Reactors (3-0-3). 

Description, analysis, and design of biochemical reactors. Interplay of heat and mass 
transfer with biochemical kinetics in biochemical reactors. Fermentation, enzyme, and 
tissue culture reactors. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 361, 501 or 471 and Chemical Engineer- 
ing 390 or equivalent. 

Mr. San, Mr. Glacken 

591b. Heterogeneous Catalysis (3-0-3). 

Principles of heterogeneous catalyst, catalyst preparation, measurement and signifi- 
cance of surface physical and chemical properties, absorption, heterogeneous kinetics, 
diffusion in porous media, catalyst poisoning and regeneration, aspects of reactor engineer- 
ing, and a review of selected commercial catalytic reactions. 

Mr. Hightower 

593a. Polymer Science & Engineering (3-0-3). 

Basic concepts in macromolecular chemistry and their application in the synthesis and 
chemical modification of polymers. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211,212. 

Mr. Armeniades 

594b. Properties of Polymers (3-0-3). 

Molecular organization and physical properties of polymneric materials; elastomeric, 
semicrystalline, and glassy polymers; processing and technology of polymeric systems. Also 
offered as Material Sciences 594. 

Mr. Armeniades 

601b. Fluid Mechanics and Transport (3-0-3). 

Advanced study in one of several areas of fluid mechanics or transport, including tensor 
analysis, continuum mechanics, rheology, and mathematical methods of special interest in 
fluid mechanics. 

Mr. Mclntire 

602b. Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics (3-0-3). 

Topics in hydrodynamics mcludmg areas such as waves on liquid surfaces, conventive 
diffusion in liquids, motion of drops and bubbles, and electrophoresis. 

Mr. Mclntire 



ENGINEERING/CHEMICAL 237 

611a. Advanced Topics in Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

An advanced treatment of the classical thermodynamics of pure and multicomponent 
systems. Topics include first and second law analysis of engineering problems, property 
estimation and prediction, mixture theories, phase and chemical equilibria, and availability 
analysis. 

Air. Robert 

661a. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1). 

Mr. Davis 

662b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1 ). 

Mr. Miller 

671b. Reservoir Engineering II (3-0-3). 

Computational methods in reservoir engineering; application to reserves estimation, 
recovery prediction, history matching, tertiary recovery operations. 

Air. Hirasaki 

dlla. Applied Mathematics I (3-0-3). 

Linear algebra and its applications; direct and iterative methods for the solution of 
linear systems of equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, systems of ordinary differential 
equations, quadratic forms, series solution of ordinary differential equations and special 
functions and applications to chemical engineering problems. 

Mr. Zygourakis 

673b. Applied Mathematics II (3-0-3). 

Linear operator theory. Green's functions, integral equations, perturbation and numer- 
ical methods, and functional analysis used in the solution of chemical engineering problems. 
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 672 or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Davis 

675a. Process Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Dynamic equations for discrete and continuous models of chemical systems; lumped 
parameter systems and state space representation and multivariable control techniques; 
nonlinear systems, linearization, and phase plane analysis; sampled data systems; digital 
simulation techniques. 

Mr. San 

683a. Master's Research and Thesis (Variable). 

Mr. Mclntire 

684b. Master's Research and Thesis (Variable). 

Mr. Mclntire 

692b. Chemical Reaction Engineering (3-0-3). 

Modeling of stirred tank and tubular reactors. Multiplicity and stability of steady states. 
Nonideal flow patterns and models. Diffusuin and reaction in porous catalyst pellets. 
Catalyst deactivation. Fluid-solid noncatalytic reactions. Design of fixed bed cataytic reac- 
tors. Fluidized bed reactors. Material from current literature. 

Mr. Zygourakis 

730a. Advanced Topics (3-0-3). 

Biomechanics and biomaterials; structure and function of extracellular supportive 
tissue in skeletal and cardiovascular systems; design, development, and evaluation of syn- 
thetic polymers for structural tissue replacement. 

Mr. Armeniades 



238 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

800b. Graduate Research (Variable). 

Mr. Mclntire 

Civil Engineering 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Holt, Chair 

Professors Merwin, Spanos, and Veletsos 

Associate Professor Durrani 

Assistant Professor Dakoulas 

Lecturers Gosain, Hanks, Haris and Loutzenheiser 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.C.E., M.C.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

The profession of civil engineering is concerned with the development, plan- 
ning, design, construction, and operation of large facilities and systems. These 
include buildings, bridges, and other structures of various forms; transportation 
systems, water supply systems, drainage and flood control and systems for waste 
disposal and pollution control. The planning of new communities and the redevel- 
opment of existing cities are also within the spectrum of civil engineering 
activities. 

Undergraduate Program. The professional degree is the Bachelor of Science in 
Civil Engineering. The programs leading to this degree are accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The student may choose to 
take a quite general basic program, or a more specialized option: the Environmen- 
tal Engineering Option (offered in conjunction with the Department of Environ- 
mental Science and Engineering). The departmental requirements are as follows: 

Basic Program 

Mathematics 101, 1 02, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, and Mathematical Sciences 223 and 381 or 382 
Physics 101, 102, 1 32, Chemistry 101, 102 

One of the following: Chemistry 211, Geology 101, 1 02, Environmental Engineer- 
ing 201, 443, Physics 201, Biology 122 
Two of the following: Engineering 200, 241, Materials Science 301, Geology 352 
Engineering 211, Environmental Engineering 403 

Civil Engineering 251, 300, 302, 304, 305, 306, 363, 365, 403, 404, 45 1 , 464, 470 
One of the following: Civil Engineering 530, 532, 540, 570 
One of the following: Civil Engineering 51 1, 512, 530, 532, 540, 570 

Environmental Engineering Option 

Mathematics 101, 102, 21 1, 212, and Mathematical Sciences 223 and 381 or 382 
Physics 1 1 , 1 02, 1 32, Biology 1 22, Chemistry 1 1 , 1 02, 1 07, 2 1 1 , 2 1 3 
Engineering 211, Environmental Engineering 201, 412, 401, 403 
Civil Engineering 300, 302, 304, 306, 363, 365, 403, 404, 470 
Two of the following: Environmental Engineering 517, 518, 536, 550 
One of the following: Geology 341 , 352, Environmental Engineering 443 
Chemistry 2 1 2 and 2 1 4, 3 1 1 



ENGINEERING/CIVIL 239 

In addition to the departmental requirements above, students must satisfy the 
University distribution requirements (page 62-82), and must complete a total 
program of at least 1 34 semester hours. More information on the civil engineering 
program, including a recommended course of study by semesters and suggestions 
for selecting electi ves, may be obtained from the departmental office. The program 
of each student is formulated in consultation with a departmental adviser. As soon 
as students decide on an engineering major, they should consult the departmental 
advisers. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree with a civil engineering major is also available for 
students not interested in a professional career in civil engineering. The B.A. 
program has less technical content than the B.S.C.E. program and hence more 
flexibility with electives. It is not accredited as a professional engineering curricu- 
lum. The detailed curriculum may be obtained from the departmental office. This 
curriculum requires at least 1 24 semester hours of which no fewer than 60 must be 
outside of the specific departmental requirements. 

The Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering is a suitable terminal degree for 
students interested in a professional career, but a master's degree is highly desira- 
ble. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is generally required for a career in teaching 
or in research and development. 

Graduate Program. Programs of study in structural engineering and structural 
mechanics and geotechnical engineering can lead to the degrees of Master of Civil 
Engineering, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. Special attention is 
given to developing the student's interest in and ability for independent study and 
research in the M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs. 

Applicants for graduate study are generally required to have a Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering, with a significant emphasis on structural engineer- 
ing. Consideration may be given to applicants with some other undergraduate 
degrees if they have adequate preparation in mathematics, mechanics, and struc- 
tural analysis and design. Curricula such as engineering technology or construction 
technology do not represent adequate preparation. 

The requirements for a professional Master of Civil Engineering degree are 
described on page 239. University requirements for other advanced degrees are 
described on pages 127-132. Departmental requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are as follows. A candidate for the Master of Science degree is required to 
(1) complete at least 21 semester hours of approved courses; (2) complete an 
acceptable thesis; and (3) pass a final oral examination on the thesis. A candidate 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must satisfy the following requirements: ( 1 ) 
complete at least 48 semester hours of approved courses with high standing; (2) 
pass a comprehensive preliminary examination designed to test the candidate's 
knowledge of the field and ability to think in a creative manner; (3) pass an oral 
qualifying examination on the proposed thesis research and related topics; (4) 
complete a thesis which shall constitute an original contribution to knowledge; and 
(5) pass a final public oral examination on the thesis and related topics. If the 
departmental faculty concludes at any stage of a student's doctoral program that he 
or she is unqualified to continue, the student is denied further registration. 

The research interests of the members of the civil engineering faculty lie in the 
areas of structural and foundation dynamics, including earthquake engineering 
and offshore structures, applications of probability theory to civil engineering 
problems, particularly random vibrations and structural fatigue; behavior of 



240 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

concrete components and structural systems; experimental studies of fatigue in 
steel structural assemblies; and mechanical properties of soils. 

M.S. and Ph.D. students are expected to participate in the instructional 
activites of the Department as part of their educational experience. This service 
will not usually be required for more than one semester of an M.S. program or two 
semesters of a Ph.D. program, nor for more than ten hours per week in any 
semester. 



Civil Engineering Courses 

251a. Plane Surveying (2-3-3). 

Fundamental surveying principles and techniques. 

Mr. Hanks 

300b. Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Stresses and deformations due to various loads. Study of engineering properties of 
materials and failure theories. Prerequisite: Engineering 211. 

Mr. Merwin 

302b. Strength of Materials Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Standard tension, compression, and torsion tests of ferrous and nonferrous metals; 
experimental techniques, behavior of structural elements. Enrollment limited, preference 
given to Civil Engineering majors. 

Mr. Merwin 

304b. Structural Analysis I (3-0-3). 

Analysis of statically determinate structures; stability and determinacy; influence lines 
and moving loads. Calculation of deflections. Introduction to analysis of indeterminate 
structures. Prerequisite: Engineering 2 1 1 and concurrent registration in Civil Engineering 
300. 

Staff 

305a. Structural Analysis II (3-0-3). 

Classical and matrix methods of structural analysis. Energy principles; virtual work; 
complementary and potential energy. Classical force methods. The direct stiffness method; 
the flexibility method. Introduction to the finite element method. Prerequisite: Civi 304. 

Mr. Holt 

306b. Steel Design (3-0-3). 

Design of steel members, connections, and assemblies. Behavior of steel members as 
related to design. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 304. 

Mr. Holt 

341a. Applications of Personal Computers to Civil Engineering Problems 

(2-3-3). 

Topics covered include graphical presentation of data; curve fitting; eigenvalue 
problems; linear optimization; and two dimensional structural analysis. Prerequisite: Civil 
Engineering 300, knowledge of computer programming. Permission of instructor required. 
Enrollment limited. 

Mr. Merwin 

363a. Applied Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Fluid properties, fluid statics and incompressible fluid steady flow. Energy and momen- 
tum equations with many applications. Similitude and dimensional analysis. Viscous fluid 
flow in pipes and pipe networks. 

Mr. Merwin 



ENGINEERING/CIVIL 241 

365a. Hydraulics Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Laminar and turbulent flow through pipes and fittings; open channel flow and hydraulic 
machinery. 

Mr. Merwin 

403b. Reinforced Concrete Design (3-0-3). 

Material properties, flexural strength of rectangular and T-sections; strength design of 
beams, one-way slabs and footings; shear strength; deflections; and column design. Use of 
handbooks and computer programs for design. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 304. 

Mr. Durrani 

404b. Concrete Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Tests of materials and reinforced concrete members. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 
403 (concurrent). 

Mr. Durrani 

406a. Measurement and Control (3-3-4). 
Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 406. 

Mr. Bourland 

451b. Introduction to Transportation (3-0-3). 

Operational characteristics of transport modes, elements of transportation planning, 
and design of stationary elements. 

Mr. Loutzenheiser 

464b. Hydrology and Watershed Analysis (3-3-4). 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrography techniques, flood routing, and open 
channel flow; local watershed application and laboratory. Also offered as Environmental 
Science and Engineering 412. Prerequisite: Civi 363. 

Mr. Bedient 

470a. Basic Soil Mechanics (3-3-4). 

Subsurface exploration, soil properties, deformation and strength characteristics under 
drained and undrained loading conditions, fluid flow through soil, consolidation and settle- 
ments, lateral earth pressures and retaining walls, bearing capacity and settlement of 
foundations. 

Mr. Dakoulas 

499a,b. Special Problems (Variable). 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations, special lectures, and semi- 
nars. Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. 

Staff 

500a. Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in stress analysis, curved beams, beams on elastic supports, plates, 
torsion of noncircular sections, columns, buckling, plate analysis. Enrollment normally 
limited to seniors and first-year graduate students. 

Mr. Merwin 

503b. Structural Analysis by Matrix Methods (3-0-3). 

Flexibility and stiffness of structural elements. Compatibility and equilibrium. Force 
and displacement methods of analysis. Finite element methods. Nonlinear structures. 
Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 305 or equivalent. 

Mr. Holt 



242 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

508a. Engineering Analysis (3-0-3). 

Numerical integration of initial value problems. Energy methods, variational calculus. 
Finite difference, discrete element, and series methods for continuous boundary value 
problems. Applications in structural mechanics. 

Staff 

509. Analysis of Offshore Structures (3-0-3). 
See Mechanical Engineering 509. 

Mr. Spanos 

511. Optimality in Design (3-0-3). 

Application of optimization techniques to design and operation of civil engineering 
systems. Topics include problem formulation, linear and nonlinear optimization, and 
scheduling problems. Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

512a. Applicationsof Probability (3-0-3). 

Probability, statistics, and decision theory applied to problems of design and operation 
of civil engineering systems. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381 or 382. 

Staff 

514a. Theoretical Plasticity (3-0-3). 
See Mechanical Engineermg 514. 

Mr. Cheatham 

515b. Structural Plasticity, Fatigue, and Fracture(3-0-3). 

Problems in limit analysis and design, plastic behavior of structures, fatigue failure and 
brittle fracture of structural components. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 515. 

Mr. Merwin 

516b. Plates (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theories of plates with applications to practical problems. 

Mr. Veletsos 

519. Shells (3-0-3). 

Introduction to theories of shells with applications to practical problems. Offered 
irregularly. 

Mr. Veletsos 

521a. Structural Dynamics I (3-0-3). 

Dynamics of force-excited discrete linear systems with applications to design. Prerequi- 
site: permission of instructor for undergraduates not in Structural Option Program. 

Mr. Veletsos 

522b. Structural Dynamics II (3-0-3). 

Dynamics of force-excited continuous linear systems and ground-excited linear and 
yielding structures. Fundamentalsof earthquake engineering. Prerequisite: Civil Engineer- 
ing 521. 

Mr. Veletsos 

523b. Probabilistic Structural Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Dynamic response of structural systems to excitations characterized as stochastic 
processes. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 521 or Mechanical Engineering 412 and basic 
knowledge of probability theory. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 523. 

Mr. Spanos 



ENGINEERING/CIVIL 243 

524b. Nonlinear Vibrations (3-0-3). 

See description for Mechanical Engineering 524. 

Mr. Spanos 

525b. Structural Dynamics III (3-0-3). 

Special topics in structural dynamics, including problems of wave propagation, re- 
sponse of structures to waves, dynamics of foundations, soil-structure and fluid-structure 
interaction. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 521. 

Mr. Veletsos 

526. Structural Stability (3-0-3). 

Stability criteria. Flexural and torsional buckling of columns and frames, lateral buck- 
ling of beams, plate buckling. Effect ofimperfections on strength. Beam-columns. Evaluation 
of design code provisions. Offered irregulary. 

Staff 

530a. Concrete Building Design (3-0-3). 

Design of reinforced concrete building structures and floor slab systems. Case histories 
will be discussed. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 403. 

Mr. Gosain 

531a. Bebavior of Reinforced Concrete Members (3-0-3). 

Moment-curvature relationship for beams and columns, biaxally loaded columns, 
slenderness effects, interaction diagrams, shear and torsion in members, shear wall-frame 
interaction, behavior under large load reversals; extensive use of microcomputers. Prerequi- 
site: Civil Engineering 403. 

Mr. Durrani 

532b. Prestressed Concrete (3-0-3). 

Prestressing techniques, prestress losses, deflections, shear and torsion, analysis and 
design of members using microcomputers, composite members, continuous beams and 
prestressed slabs. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 403. 

Mr. Durrani 

540b. High-Rise Building Design (3-0-3). 

Practical considerations from the conceptual stage to the final analysis; including design 
parameters and serviceability limitations. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 305, 306, 403. 

Mr. Maris 

570b. Foundation Engineering (3-0-3). 

Bearing capacity and settlement analysis; design of footings, mats, floating foundations, 
piers, piles, retaining walls, tlexiable retaining structures, anchor tie-backs, and underpin- 
nings. Prerequisite: Civi 470 or equivalent. 

Mr. Dakoulas 

571a. Soil Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Behavior of soil subjected to dynamic and cyclic loading, including field and laboratory 
testing; seismic behavior of soil deposits and earth dams; design of machine foundations. 
Prerequisite: Civi 470 or equivalent. 

Mr. Dakoulas 

699a,b. Special Problems (Variable). 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction of a 
member of the civil engineering faculty. Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and 
student. 

Staff 

800a,b. Research and Thesis (Variable). 

Staff 



244 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Computer Science 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Kennedy, Chair 

Professor Cartwright 

Adjunct Professor Gorry 

Assistant Professors Almes, Boehm, Felleisen, Golson, Hood, Krentel, Pollock, 

J. Warren, and Zwaenepoel 

Adjunct Assistant Professor S. Warren 

Research Scientists Callahan, Cooper, and Torczon 

Lecturers Pearlman and Raulston 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.C.S., M.S., and Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. During the first two years, all computer science 
majors are required to take the following courses: 
Mathematics 101, 102 (or 121, 122) 
Physics 101 
Computer Science 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 280, 320 

In addition, the following courses are strongly recommended: 
Mathematics 21 1,212 
Physics 102, 132 

During the spring semester of the sophomore year, prospective majors should 
apply for admission into the program. Because enrollment in the major is limited 
to the number of students that the facilities can handle, some applications may be 
turned down. After admission, a student will plan a course of study for the junior 
and senior years with a departmental undergraduate adviser. To complete the 
major, a student must fulfill the following requirements: 

Software engineering: Computer Science 310 

Algorithms: Computer Science 382 

Linear algebra: Mathematical Sciences 3 1 or Mathematics 355 

Probability/Statistics: Statistics 381 or 382 

Software systems: Computer Science 4 1 2 or 42 1 

Hardware and architecture: Electrical and Computer Engineering 326 or 425 

Computational mathematics: one of Mathematical Sciences 353, 451, 452, 

453,454,471 
Mathematics: one of 212, 312, 356, 425, or 463 

plus two of the following courses not used to satisfy the above requirements: 

Computer Science 340, 411,412,421,425, 440, 480, 48 1 

The courses required for the major sum to between 60 and 63 hours. Since the 
University requires 60 hours in addition to those used for the major, as many as 
1 23 hours may be needed to graduate. 



ENGINEERING/COMPUTER SCIENCE 245 

Undergraduate Honors Program. A student can, with the permission of the 
department, join the undergraduate honors program in Computer Science. The 
requirements for the freshman and sophomore years of the program arc identical 
to the first two years in the standard program above. In order to complete the 
requirements for the major, a student must take the following courses: 

Software engineering: Computer Science 310 

Algorithms: Computer 382 

Linear algebra: Mathematical Sciences 310 or Mathematics 355 

Probability/Statistics: Statistics 381 or 382 

Software systems: Computer Science 4 1 2 and 42 1 

Formal languages: Computer Science 48 1 

Hardware systems: Electrical and Computer Engineering 425 

Computational mathematics: one of Mathematical Sciences 451, 452, 453, 

454,471 
Mathematics: 425 or 463 

plus one of 

Computer Science 340, 41 1, 480, 492 

For more information about the program, please contact the departmental 
secretary. 

Graduate Program. The department offers three graduate programs, the pro- 
fessional master's, the research master's and the doctoral. The professional pro- 
gram, a terminal degree program for students intending to pursue a technical 
career in the computer industry, awards the Master of Computer Science degree. 
To earn the degree, the student must successfully complete thirty semester hours of 
coursework approved by the department. A minimum grade point average must be 
achieved over all courses counting toward the degree. The professional master's 
program normally requires three semesters of study. 

The research master's program requires a thesis in addition to coursework and 
culminates in the Master of Science degree. Admission to this program, however, is 
reserved for special situations. 

The doctoral program, offered to students planning to pursue a career in 
computer science research and education, awards the degree of Doctor of 
Philosphy. To earn this degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion covering the core areas of computer science, pass a qualifying examination in 
an area of specialization, conduct original research, submit an acceptable thesis 
proposal, successfully defend the thesis proposal, submit an acceptable thesis 
reporting research results, and pass a final oral defense. Upon successful comple- 
tion of the comprehensive examination, the qualifying examination and the 
proposal defense, the student will be awarded the Master of Science degree. After a 
successful thesis defense and the completion of all departmental and university 
requirements, the student will be awarded the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The 
doctoral program normally requires four to five years of study. 

Fellowships and research assistantships are available to students in the doc- 
toral program. Both provide a monthly stipend for the academic year and cover all 
tuition expenses. More substantial monthly stipends may be available during the 
summer for students working on departmental research projects. In all cases, 
continued support is contingent on satisfactory progress in the program. During 



246 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

the academic year, students in the doctoral program assist the department in the 
teaching and administration of undergraduate and graduate courses. However, 
such duties will not be required of any student for more than four semesters and 
will not exceed an average often hours per week. 

Current research interests of the faculty include algorithms, compiler con- 
struction, distributed systems, geometric modeling and robotics, parallel process- 
ing, performance evaluation, programming environments, programming lan- 
guages, program verification, semantics, symbolic computation, and the theory of 
computation. 

For further information and application materials, write the Department of 
Computer Science, Rice University, Post Office Box 1 892, Houston, Texas 7725 1 - 
1892. 



Computer Science Courses 

Note that course registrations at the 300 and 400 level may be restricted. In 
addition, course registrations at the 500 level and above require the permission of 
the instructor. 

100. Introduction to Computing (3- 1 -3). 

History of computation. The organization of computer systems. Introduction to Com- 
puter applications such as spreadsheets and data bases, and to operating systems, program- 
ming languages, and artificial intelligence. Introduction to programming using Pascal. Not 
mtended for science-engineering students. May not be taken for credit after any other 
programming course. 

200. Elements of Computer Science (3-0-3). 

A broad introduction to the major topics of computer science, including algorithms, 
mathematical models of computation, machine organization and design, programming 
languages, communication, and artificial intelligence. Not intended for science-engineering 
students. 

211. Introduction to Programming (3-1-3). 

Introduction to programming using Pascal. Problem solving and algorithms, elementa- 
ry data structures, procedures and functions, debugging. 

212. Intermediate Programming (3-1-3). 

Programming methodology, problem solving, recursion, data structures, introduction 
to analysis of algorithms, sorting techniques. Prerequisite: Computer Science 211. 

280. Mathematics of Computer Science (4-0-4). 

Mathematical induction, recursive definitions and recurrence equations, finite state 
machines, computability. Prerequisites: Mathematics 102, Computer Science 21 1. 

290. Computer Science Projects ( 1 -4). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of department. 

310. Programming Studio (2-6-4). 

Advanced programming methods, including structured programming, team program- 
ming, program specification and testing. Prerequisites: Computer Science 212, 280. 



ENGINEERING/COMPUTER SCIENCE 247 

320. Introduction to Computer Organization (3-3-4). 

Basic computer architecture and assembly language programing. System software, 
including loaders and assemblers. Input-output devices and programing. Prerequisite: Com- 
puter Science 212. 

340. Symbolic Computation (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the functional, equational and logic programming paradigms. Topics 
include data abstraction, higher-order functions, rewriting systems, interpretation, lazy 
evaluation, unification and resolution. Prerequisites: Computer Science 212, 280. 

382. Design Analysis of Algorithms (4-0-4). 

Design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures. Prerequisites: 
Computer Science 2 1 2, 280. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 322. 

390. Computer Science Projects ( 1 -4). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the department. 

411. Programming Languages ( 3-3-4). 

The design, definition and abstract implementation of programming languages includ- 
ing methods for precisely specifying syntax and semantics. Prerequisites: Computer Science 
320, 340. 

412, Compiler Construction (3-3-4). 

Topics in the design of programming language translators, including parsing, run-time 
storage management, error recovery, code generation and optimization. Prerequisite: Com- 
puter Science 382. 

421. Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the design, construction, and analysis of concurrent programs with an 
emphasis on operating systems, including filing systems, schedulers, and memory allocators. 
Specific attention is devoted to process synchronization and communication within concur- 
rent programs. Prerequisites: Computer Science 2 1 2, 320. Also offered as Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 42 1 . 

425. Computer Systems (3-3-4). 

Memory hierarchy, storage management, addressing, control, and input-output. 
Microprograming. Comparison of solutions to computer system design problems. Prerequi- 
sites: Computer Science 320 and Electrical and Computer Engineering 326. Also offered as 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 425. 

440. Artificial Intelligence (3-0-3). 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behavior by machine, problem solving, game 
playing, pattern perceiving, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and auto- 
matic programming. Computer vision, natural language understanding, the computer as a 
metaphor for mind. Prerequisites: Computer Science 382, Statistics 382 or 38 1 . Also offered 
as Electrical and Computer Engineering 521. 

480. Concrete Mathematics (3-0-3). 

Discrete and combinatorial mathematics, including sums and products, integer func- 
tions, elementary number theory, factorials, binomial coefficients, harmonic numbers, 
Fibonacci numbers, generating functions, asymptotic representations. Applications to ad- 
vanced algorithm analysis. Not necessarily offered every year. Prerequisite: Computer 
Science 382. 

481. Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability (4-0-4). 

Finite automata, regular expressions, regular languages, pushdown automata, context- 
free languages, Turing machines, recursive languages, computability, and solvability. Pre- 
requisite: Computer Science 382. 



248 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

490. Computer Science Projects ( 1 -9). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction Prerequisite- oer- 
mission of department. 

491. Computer Science Teaching (3-0-3). 

A combination of in-service teaching and a seminar. Prerequisite- permission of 
department. 

492. Computer Science Honors Project (3-9). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Open only to stu- 
dents m the undergraduate honors program in Computer Science. Prerequisite- permission 
of the department. 

512. Advanced Compiler Construction (3-3-4). 

Advanced topics in the design and implementation of programming language transla- 
tors. Data flow analysis and optimization, code generation and register allocation, attribute 
grammars and their evaluation, translation within programming environments Prerequi- 
site: Computer Science 412. 

513. Compilation of Very High Languages (3-0-3) 

Automatic Storage Management. Representation of function closures and continua- 
tions. Implementation of logic programming. Type checking in the presence of polymorphic 
typing and overloading. Compiler generation from formal semantics. 

519. Topics in Programming Language (3-0-3). 
Content varies at the discretion of the instructor. 

520. Distributed Systems (3-3-4). 

Distributed systems: workstations, local area networks, server machines. Multiprocess 
structuring and interprocess communication. File access and memory management User 
interfaces: window systems and command interpreters. Case studies of selected destributed 
systems. Emphasis on performance aspects of system software design Prerequisites- Com- 
puter Science 421, 425. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 520. 

525. Advanced Computer Architecture (3-0-3). 

Design issues of pipelined, vector, and multiprocessor architectures. Development of 
performance evaluation techniques to model and simulate configuration of concurrent 
architectures. Software aspects of processing and their effect on performance Prerequisite- 
Computer Science 425. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 525. 

526. Computer Networks: Design and Analysis (3-0-3). 

Design and comparison of computer networks, techniques for performance analysis 
connectivity and reliability, capacity assignment. Network topologies. Local area networks 
including rings, busses, and contention networks. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 428. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 526. 

529. Computer Networks: Architecture and Protocols (3-0-3). 

Introduction to computer networks and computer communication. Design of protocols 
for error recovery, reliable delivery, routing and congestion control. Store-and-forward 
networks, satellite networks, local area networks and locally distributed systems Case 
studies of networks, protocols and protocol families. Emphasis on software design isues in 
computer communication. Prerequisites: Statistics 382, Computer Science 42 1 Also offered 
as Electrical and Computer Science 529. 

530. Database Systems (3-0-3). 

Survey of database system implementation and design techniques. File structures 
relational, hierarchical and network schemes, query languages, protection and concurrent 
access. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. 



ENGINEERING/COMPUTER SCIENCE 249 

541. Applied Artificial Intelligence (3-0-3). 

The uses of artificial intelligence to augment human capabilities. Decision support 
systems, expert systems with emphasis on applications in complex organizational settings. 
Conceptual and technical limitations of existing expert systems technology and possible 
remedies. Preresuisite: Computer Science 440. 

561. Geometric Modeling (3-0-3). 

Curves and surfaces: parametric form, implicit form, conversion between forms. Rep- 
resentation of solids: wireframes, octtrees, boundary representations, constructive solid 
geometry. Applications: graphics, motion planning, simulation, finite element mesh genera- 
tion. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. 

581. Theory of Computation (3-0-3). 

Advanced theory of computation, computational complexity, NP-compIete problems. 
Prerequisite: Computer Science 48 1 . 

582. Advanced Algorithms (3-0-3). 

Advanced design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures, 
lower bound techniques, semi-numerical algorithms, and fast Fourier transforms. Prerequi- 
site: Computer Science 48 1 . 

583. VLSI Algorithms (3-0-3). 

Models of parallel computation. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms. VLSI 
complexity: area-time tradeoffs. Area efficient VLSI networks. Prerequisite: Computer 
Science 382. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 5 1 9. 

590. Computer Science Project ( 1 -9). 

Advanced theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

600. Graduate Seminar in Computer Science ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

A discussion of selected topics in computer science. 

611. Semantics of Programmming Languages (3-0-3). 

The operational and denotational semantics of programming languages. Prerequisites: 
Computer Science 411,481. 

612. Graduate Seminar in Compiler Construction (2-0-2). 

Topics in construction of programming language translators. Prerequisite: Computer 
Science 512. 

619c. Teaching Advanced Placement Computer Science (3-0-3). 

620. Graduate Seminar in Distributed Computing ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

Content varies at discretion of instructor. Prerequisite: Computer Science 520. 

680. Graduate Seminar Theory of Computation (1-0-1 ). 

Content varies at discretion of instructor. Prerequisites: Computer Science 581. 582. 

690. Research and Thesis (1-15). 

700c. Summer Graduate Research (1-15). 

800. Doctoral Research (1-15). 



250 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Electrical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Burrus, Chair 

Professors Burrus, J.W. Clark, D. H. Johnson, de Figueiredo, Jump, Leeds, 

Pearson, Pfeiffer, Rabson, Tittel, and W.L. Wilson 

Adjunct Professor Marowsky 

Associate Professors Antoulas, Sauerbrey, and Sinclair 

Adjunct Associate Professor: P.H. Murphy 

Assistant Professors Aazhang, Bennett, Varman, and Wisoff 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Garcia 

Lecturers Bourland, Cyprus, Henson, Krishen, Philippe, and Papamichalis 

Adjunct Lecturer Nudelmann 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The four-year program in electrical engineering 
leads to either the B.A. or the B.S. in Electrical Engineering. The B.S. program has 
more technical requirements, and is the only degree accredited by the Accredita- 
tion Board for Engineering and Technology, while the B.A. program allows more 
flexibility with electives. It is possible in either program to satisfy major require- 
ments of two departments. Students may take a double major combining electrical 
and computer engineering with physics, mathematics, economics, languages, or 
other disciplines. 

Students contemplating a major in electrical and computer engineering 
should take: 

Mathematics 101, 1 02, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 (or the corresponding honors courses) 

Physics 101, 102, 132 

Computer Science 2 1 1 

Engineering 241 

Three courses plus one laboratory selected from: 

Chemistry 101, 102, 107, Physics 201, 202, 231 

One of the following to satisfy the B.S. requirement for an engineering science 
course from another engineering department: Engineering 200, 211, Materials 
Science 245, 301 

Electrical Engineering 301, 305, 320, 326, 342 (all of these courses are re- 
quired for the B.S. degree, while any four of them are required for the B.A. degree) 

Although a general program of study can be arranged, the program in electrical 
engineering may be described in terms of three major areas of concentration. This 
program consists of six courses taken in the area of concentration (see below) and 
two related electrical engineering courses outside the major area. For the B.S. 
degree, one of those courses must be an engineering science course, and the other 
must be an engineering design course, except for those concentrating in Computer 
Science and Engineering, who must take two engineering science courses. 



ENGINEERING/ELECTRICAL 251 

Circuits, Controls, and Communication Systems 

This specialization is composed of three subareas: ( 1 ) circuits and electronics, 
(2) dynamics and control, and (3) information processing and communications. 
These are closely related and generally involve the study of processing and commu- 
nicating signals and information through systems of devices. The major area 
courses are Mathematical Sciences 330, Electrical Engineering 33 1 , 40 1 , 430, 436, 
and one of Mathematical Sciences 353 or 460. 



Computer Science and Engineering 

This program is divided into the following three topics: ( 1 ) hardware engineer- 
ing, (2) software engineering, and (3) discrete system modeling. The major area 
courses are Mathematical Sciences 381, Electrical Engineering 425; 322, 421, or 
426; and Computer Science 280, 3 1 0, or 48 1 . 



Lasers, Microwaves, and Solid-State Electronics 

This area of concentration permits undergraduate students to study and 
participate in several specialties, including laser technology, optical communica- 
tion systems, application and development of tunable laser devices, semiconduc- 
tor devices, opto-electronic devices, and integrated optics and VLS 1 circuits. The 
major area courses are Mathematical Sciences 340, Electrical Engineering 306, 
459,461,462,463. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students seeking 
the B.A. degree must also satisfy the distribution requirement and complete no 
fewer than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total 
program of at least 1 30 semester hours. For the B.S. degree, no fewer than 42 
semester hours outside departmental requirements for a total of 133 semester 
hours are required. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Graduate Program. Requirements of a general nature for advanced degrees are 
outlined on pages 127-132. In addition to the above areas, there is a graduate 
program in bioengineering. Students should consult departmental advisers for 
specific courses of study. 

A candidate for the professional degree of Master of Electrical Engineering is 
required to complete an approved sequence often advanced courses. See Profes- 
sional Degrees in Engineering, page 129-130. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree in the Department of Electrical 
and Computer Engineering is required to complete an approved course of study. In 
addition, the candidate is required to complete an approved research program and 
submit an acceptable thesis. A semester or more of supervised teaching is required 
as a valuable part of graduate education. The M.S. degree is not a terminal degree, 
but part of the Ph.D. program at Rice. 

The granting of the Doctor of Philosophy degree presupposes academic work 
of high quality and demonstrated ability to do independent and creative research. 
To be admitted to candidacy, the student must obtain high standing in an ap- 
proved course program and perform satisfactorily on qualifying examinations. 
Normally, the candidate completes the requirements for an M.S. degree as part of 
the Ph.D. program. Qualified students may, upon recommendation of the depart- 
ment and approval of the Graduate Council, enter a program leading directly to 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree after completing the bachelor's degree. The 



252 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

candidate must participate in a program of supervised teaching. Emphasis is 
placed on research leading to a satisfactory dissertation. Each candidate takes a 
final oral examination. The doctoral candidate should expect to spend a minimum 
of three academic years of graduate study in this program. 

In addition to the regular graduate programs, there are four interdisciplinary 
graduate programs designed particularly for those who received their previous 
degree(s) in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or other sciences, including under- 
graduate engineering science programs, but who have become interested in the 
engineering applications appropriate to a particular field of science. These pro- 
grams are systems theory, solid-state electronics and materials science, computer 
science and bioengineering. 



Electrical Engineering Courses 

301b,a. Network and Systems Theory (3-0-3). 

Analysis of lineai systems using circuits as the primary example. Time and frequency 
domain analysis: solution of differential equation, convolution, and the Laplace transform. 
State- variable analysis. Engineering Science. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Engineering 
241. 

Mr. Johnson. Mr. Pearson 

305a,b. Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (3-0-3). 

Distributed systems. Transmission lines. Smith Charts and impedance matching. Static 
and oscillatory fields. Maxwell's equations. Interaction of waves with media antennae. 
Engineering Science. 

Mr. Sauerbrey, Mr. Tittel 

306b. Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0-3). 

Electrostatic fields and boundary value problems. Magnetic fields and interaction with 
materials. Time dependent electromagnetic fields. Plane waves, waveguides, and resonators. 
Engineering Science. 

Mr. Wisoff 

320a. Introduction to Computer Organization (3-3-4). 

Basic computer architecture and assembly language programming. Systems software, 
including loaders and assemblers. Input-output devices and programming. Engineering 
Design. Prerequisite: Computer Science 211. 

Mr. Varman 

322b. Design/Analysisof Algorithms (3-3-4). 

Design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures. Engineering 
Science. Prerequisite: Computer Science 212, 280. Also offered as Computer Science 382. 

326b,a. Digital Logic Design (3-3-4). 

Gates, flip-flops, combinational and sequential switching circuits, registers, data trans- 
fer paths, logical and arithmetic operations. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Computer 
Science 211, Engineering 24 1 . 

Mr. Sinclair 

331 b,a. Applied Probability (3-0-3). 

Concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications of modern 
probability theory, including a brief introduction to statistical inference. Engineering Sci- 
ence. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 02. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 38 1 . 

Mr. Pfeiffer 



ENGINEERING/ELECTRICAL 253 

342a,b. Electronic Circuits (3-3-4). 

Models of transistors, FETs, and integrated circuits. Biasing methods, two-port analy- 
sis, single and multistage amplifiers, frequency domain characteristics, feedback, stability, 
oscillators, power amplifiers. Engineering Design. Prerequisite: Engineering 241. 

Mr. Wilson, Mr. Rahson 

401a. Signals and Linear Systems (3-0-3). 

Representation and analysis of signals and linear systems using Fourier transforms and 
convolution. Applications include modulation, gating, sampling, and filtering. Generalized 
functions and transforms. Bilateral Laplace and Z transforms. Prerequisite: Electrical 301 
and a knowledge of complex variable theory. Engineering Science. 

Mr. Clark 

421b. Operating Systems and Programs (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the design, construction, and analysis of concurrent programs with an 
emphasis on operating systems, including filing systems, schedulers, and memory allocators. 
Specific attention is devoted to process synchronization and communication within concur- 
rent programs. Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Computer Science 212, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 320. Also offered as Computer Science 421. 

425a. Computer Systems (3-3-4). 

Memory hierarchy, storage management, addressing, control, and input-output. 
Microprogramming. Comparison of solutions to computer system design problems. Engi- 
neering Science. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 320, 326. Also offered 
as Computer Science 425. 

Mr. Bennett 

426b. Digital System Design (3-3-4). 

Digital system organization, microprogrammed control units, bus architectures, 
microprocessors, memory organizations, and high speed arithmetic. Engineering Design. 
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 320, 326. 

Mr. Jump 

427a. Pulse and Digital Circuits (3-3-4). 

Discrete and integrated solid state circuits. Interaction of linear components with 
diodes, bipolar transistors, and field effect transistors. Monostable, bistable, and astable 
multivibrators. Applications of linear one and two degree of freedom circuits to digital 
hardware. Analysis of circuits and their interconnection to form digital systems. Construc- 
tion of digital projects from discrete and integrated circuits. Engineering Design. Prerequi- 
site: Electrical and Computer Engineering 342 and 326. 

Mr. Cyprus 

428b. Computer Systems Performance (3-3-4). 

Analytical models of computer systems. Queueing theory and Markov chains. Simula- 
tion and analysis of simulation results. Operational analysis. Course will include a project. 
Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 425, Mathematical 
Sciences 381 or Masc 382. 

Mr. Sinclair 

430b. Communication Theory and Systems (3-0-3). 

Review of applied probability theory. Introduction to stochastic processes. Complex- 
signal analysis. AM and FM. Digital communication, PCM, signal transmission, optimum 
receiver theory, information theory and coding. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Electrical 
and Computer Engineering 40 1 and either 33 1 or Mathematical Sciences 382. 

Mr. Aazhang 

436b. Control Systems I (3-0-3). 

Representation, analysis, and design of simple control systems in the frequency do- 
main. Engineering Design. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 301. 

Mr. Henson 



254 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

437b. Intro. Artificial Intelligence (3). 

This course is intended to introduce the student with the fundamental problem solving 
techniques of Artificial Intelligence (AI). This will be achieved through intermixing of an 
introduction to Sumbolic Manipulation (Through LISP programming) and a presentation of 
selected current AI topics. Emphasis will be placed on expert systems, which are powerful 
engineering problem-solving tools. Enrollment limited to Seniors and graduate students. 
Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Elec 342 and Elec 326. 

438b. Remote Sensing (3-0-3). 

Remote sensing using wave propagation. Statistical formulation of diffraction 
problems. Wave scattering from rough surfaces. Applications include monitoring from space 
and non-contact sensing for robotics and automation. Engineering Science. 

Mr. Krishen 

442a. Advanced Electronic Circuits (3-0-3). 

Electronic circuits used in communication and other systems, including principles of 
feedback, modulation, detection, and active filtering. Emphasis on design. Engineering 
Design. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 342. 

Mr. Leeds 

459a. Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Schroedinger's equation; harmonic oscillators; band theory of solids; hydrogen mole- 
cule; spins and angular momentum; interaction of matter with radiation; spectroscopy; 
scattering processes and nonlinear susceptibility; quantum statistics; transport phenomena. 
Engineering Science. 

Mr. Wisoff 

461a. Electrical Properties of Materials (3-0-3). 

Properties and parameters of dielectric, conducting, and semiconducting materials 
important in the understanding of device characteristics. Engineering Science. Corequisite: 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 459. 

Mr. Rabson 

462b. Semiconductor Devices (3-4-4). 

Physical principles and operational characteristics of semiconductor devices. Engineer- 
ing Design. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 46 1 . 

Mr. Wilson 

463b. Quantum Electronic Devices (3-0-3). 

Lasers, optoelectronics, integrated optics, nonlinear optics, holography, and optical 
processing. Engineering Science. 

Mr. Sauerbrey 

481a. Bioengineering I (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the basic concepts of medical electrophysiology including studies of 
the genesis of electrical activity in nerve and muscle (both skeletal and cardiac), measure- 
ment instrumentation systems and mathematical modeling techniques. These fundamental 
topics lead to detailed discussion of the more common electrical signals recorded from the 
body for diagnostic purposes (e.g. the electromyogram and the electrocardiogram). Basic 
electrical recording methods will be discussed including electrode systems and electronic 
amplifiers. Mathematical models of cellular excitation processes will be developed and 
discussed, along with numerical methods for solving the model equations. A term project is 
required. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Engineering 24 1 . 

Mr. Clark 



ENGINEERING/ELECTRICAL 255 

482b. Bioengineering II (3-4-4). 

A continuation of Electrical and Computer Engineering 481 focusing on several large 
organ systems including the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Advanced topics in 
amplifier design will'be covered along with instrumentation used in measuring variables 
associated with these organ systems (e.g. pressure, temperature and length transducers). 
Mathematical models of these systems and numerical methods for obtaining solutions will be 
discussed. A term project is required. Engineering Science. Prerequisites: Electrical Engi- 
neering 342, 30 1 , 48 1 . 

Mr. Clark 

490a. Electrical Engineering Projects (Variable). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

491a. Senior Honors Projects (2). 

A two-semester sequence for individual projects supervised by a faculty member of the 
department. The portions of the first semester course (491) are devoted to the group 
discussion of professional aspects of engineering: technical writing, engineering ethics, 
research protocols, patent considerations. A written proposal describing the project is 
required. Oral presentations throughout the year culminating in a final written report and in 
an oral, conference-style presentation. Senior standing in the department and permission of 
the course coordinator required. No credit will be given for Elec 49 1 without completion of 
Elec 492. 

Mr. Johnson D. 

492b. Senior Honors Projects (3). 

Same course description as Elec 491a. No credit will be given for Elec 491 without 
completion of Elec 492. 

Mr. Johnson D. 

496a. Robotics Laboratory (1-0-1 ). 

Computer vision experiments, programming a mobile robot and an industrial-type 
PUMA robot, operating a CNC mill and an industrial-size CNC lathe, projects. Engineering 
Design. 

Mr. Cheatham 

498b. Introduction to Robotics (3-0-3). 

A survey of topics in robotics including kinematics, dynamics and control theory 
applied to robotics. Lectures are given on image processing and computer vision, voice 
synthesis and speech recognition, artificial intelligence, and computer robot simulation. 
Laboratory includes programming of Microbot and PUMA robotic arms. Engineering 
Science. 

Mr. Cheatham 

501a. Linear System Theory (3-0-3). 

Realization theory. Matrix fraction description of multivariable systems. Stabilization, 
and controller parametrization. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 301 or equivalent. 

Mr. Pearson 

502b. Control System Synthesis (3-0-3). 

Optimal synthesis of control systems using various norms. Stability lobustness. Com- 
putational solutions using state space methods. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Elec 50 1 . 

Mr. Pearson 

505a, Advanced Electrical Field Theory (3-0-3). 

Boundary-value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. Propagation of electro- 
magnetic waves in free space, in conducting media, and in anistropic dielectrics. Engineering 
Science. 

Mr. Tittel 



256 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

506b. Applications of Electromagnetic Field Theory(3-0-3). 

Waveguides and cavities, antennae, diffraction, holography, magnetohydrodynamics, 
and radiation from moving charges. Engineering Science. 

Mr. TittelF. 

507a. Nonlinear Analysis (3-0-3). 

Analytical methods, including singular point and phase plane analysis, describing 
functions, stability analysis via Lyapunov functions; analog and digital computer simulation 
methods; parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis. Engineering Science. 

Mr. Clark 

519b. VLSI Algorithms (3-0-3). 

Models of parallel computation. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms. VLSI 
complexity. Area-time tradeoffs. Area efficient VLSI networks. Engineering Science. Prereq- 
uisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 322. Also offered as Computer Science 583. 

Mr. Varman 

520a. Distributed Systems (3-3-4). 

Distributed systems: workstations, local area networks, server machines. Multiprocess 
structuring and interprocess communication. File access and memory management. User 
interfaces: window systems and command interpreters. Case studies of selected distributed 
systems. Emphasis on performance aspects of system software design. Engineering Design. 
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 421, 425. Also offered as Computer 
Science 520. 

521b. Artificiallntelligence (3-3-4). 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behavior by machine: problem solving, game 
playing, pattern perceiving, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and auto- 
matic programming. Engineering Science 

Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 322; 33 1 or Mathematical Sciences 382. 
Also offered as Computer Science 440. 

525a. Advanced Computer Architecture (3-0-3). 

Design issues of pipelined, vector, and multiprocessor architectures. Development of 
performance evaluation techniques to model and simulate configurations of concurrent 
architectures. Software aspects of processing and their effects on performance. Engineering 
Science. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 425. Also offered as Computer 
Science 525. 

526a. Computer Networks: Design and Analysis (3-0-3). 

Design and comparison of computer networks; techniques for performance analysis; 
connectivity and reliability; capacity asignment. Network topologies. Local area networks, 
including rings, busses, and contention networks. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Electri- 
cal and Computer Engineering 428. Also offered as Computer Science 526. 

529b. Computer Networks: Architecture and Protocols (3-0-3). 

Introduction to computer networks and computer communication. Design of protocols 
for error recovery, reliable delivery, routing and congestion control. Store-and-forward 
networks, satellite networks, local area networks, and locally distributed systems. Case 
studies of networks, protocols and protocol families. Emphasis on software design issues in 
computer communication. Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Mathematical Sciences 382, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 42 1 . Also offered as Computer Science 529. 

530b. Detection Theory (3-0-3). 

Review of stochastic processes, Karhunen-Loeve expansion, transmission and recep- 
tion of digital signals over a variety of channels; intersymbol interference and equalization. 
Additional topics vary from year to year in modern communication theory. Engineering 
Science. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 430. 

Mr. Johnson 



ENGINEERING/ELECTRICAL 257 

531a. Digital Signal Processing (3-0-3). 

Analysis of discrete-time signals and systems. Design and implementation of digital 
filters. Efficient algorithms for the discrete Fourier transform and for convolution. Engineer- 
ing Science. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 40 1 or a senior-level course 
in signals and linear systems. 

Mr. Burrus 

533a. Introduction to Random Processes and Applications (3-0-3). 

Review of basic probability; Sequence of random variables; Random vectors and 
estimation; Basic concepts of random processes; Random processes in linear systems, 
expandion of random processes; Wiener filtering; Spectral representation of random 
processes; White-noise integrals. Engineering Science. Also offered as Mathematical Sci- 
ences 583. 

Mr. Aazhang 

534a. Estimation Theory (3-0-3). 

See Mathematical Sciences 584. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Science 430. 
Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 584. Engineering Science. 

Mr. de Figueiredo 

539b. Digital Image Processing (3-0-3). 

Modern techniques in 2D- and 3D-image processing. Color imaging. Scene analysis and 
robotic vision. Engineering Science. 

Mr. de Figueiredo 

560a. VLSI Design (3-3-4). 

A study of VLSI technology and design. MOS devices, characteristics and fabrication. 
Logic design and implementation. VLSI design methodology, circuit simulation and verifi- 
cation. Course includes group design projects. Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Electrical 
and Computer Engineering 326, 305. 

Mr. Jump, Mr. Wilson 

562a. Microwave Engineering (3-4-4). 

Waveguides and resonant cavities. Scattering matrix, application to two-, three-, and 
four-port devices. Broadband transformers, couplers, and filters. Microwave generation. 
Tensor susceptibility and nonreciprocal devices. Engineering Science. Prerequisite: Electri- 
cal and Computer Engineering 306. 

Mr. Wilson 

563a. Introduction to Solid State Physics I (3-0-3). 

Fundamental concepts of crystalline solids, including crystal structure, band theory of 
electrons, and lattice vibration theory. Engineering Science. Also offered as Physics 563. 

Mr. Rau 

564b. Introduction to Solid State Physics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Electrical and Computer Engineering 563, including scattering of 
waves by crystals, transport theory, and magnetic phenomena. Engineering Science. Also 
offered as Physics 564. 

Mr. Rau 

569b. VLSI Design Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Testing and evaluation of VLSI circuits designed in Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing 560. Engineering Design. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 560. 

Mr. Jump, Mr. Wilso>7 

590a,b. Electrical Engineering Projects (Variable). 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 



258 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

591a. Optics (3-0-3). 

Survey covering important aspects of classical optical theory, wave properties of light, 
and the Fourier analysis approach to physical optics. Holography, integrated optics, and 
fiber optics. Engineering Science. 

592b. Topics In Quantum Optics (3-0-3). 

Latest developments in lasers, optical pumping, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy, 
and mode locking. Not offered every year. Engineering Science. 

Mr. Sauerbrey, Mr. Wisoff 

594b. Seminar in Biomedical Engineering (3-0-3). 

A seminar course focusing on a specific area of biomedical research interest and 
involving both students and faculty from other universities in the Houston area. This course 
is taught under the sponsorship of the Houston Biomedical Engineering Society and exposes 
students to an intense treatment of a specific biological system from several scientific and 
engineering viewpoints. The faculty will consist of engineers and physicians from Rice 
University, The University of Houston, Baylor Medical School, University of Texas Medical 
School at Houston, and M. D. Anderson Cancer and Tumor Institute. The topic to be studied 
this year is the "Electrophysiology of Spinal Cord and Peripheral Nervous System." Gradu- 
ate students in chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering are particularly encouraged 
to attend. 

Mr. Clark 

619b. Advanced Topics in Parallel Processing (3-0-3). 

A graduate seminar course devoted to a study of parallel computational models and 
techniques for efficient parallel algorithm design. The course involves a critical examination 
of both fundamental as well as recent papers in the area, with the aim of providing a 
perspective and keeping abreast of this rapidly growing field. 

Mr. Varman 

625a. Advanced Topics in Computer Architecture (3-0-3). 
Variable topics.) 

632b. Speech Signal Processing (3-0-3). ^ 

Acoustic models of speech production. Pitch and format structure of speech. Estima- 
tion of speech spectra: short-time Fourier analysis, filter banks, homomorphic signal 
processing, auto-regressive models. Pitch detection. Vocoding algorithm: channel vocoders, 
homomorphic vocoders, linear predictive vocoders. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 531. 

Mr. Papamichalis 

690b. Projects (3-0-3). 

Staff 

691a. Seminar in Quantum Electronics ( 1 -0- 1 ) 

Graduate Seminar with variable topics. 

Sauerbrey & Wisoff 

692b. Microwave Engineering (Variable). 

Mr. Wilson 

693a. Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering (3-0-3). 
Graduate seminar. Varying topics. 

Bennett, J., Sinclair, J.B. 

694b. Advanced Topics in Computer Systems (3-0-3). 

Mr. Sinclair, Jump 



ENGINEERING/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 259 

AND ENGINEERING 

696b. Digital Signal Processing (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in digital signal process: time varying systems, multidimensional 
signal processing, and other topics of current interest. Individual projects are a part of this 
course. 

Mr. Burrus 

698b. Advanced Topics in Robotics (3-0-3). 

Equilibrium and nonequlibrium phenomena in the dynamics of high temperature 
gases. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Cheatham 

800a,b. Research and Thesis (Variable). 

Environmental Science and Engineering 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor C.H. Ward, Chair 

Professors Andrews, Bedient, Few, and Tomson 

Adjunct Professors Keeley, Dunlap, Raymond, Schaezler, and Wilson 

Adjunct Associate Professor Pier 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.E.E., M.E.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The major in environmental science (offered only as 
a double major with other fields of science or engineering) is intended for students 
wishing academic training oriented toward the solution of technical environmen- 
tal problems and leads to the B.A. degree. 

General requirements during the first two years include: two years of mathe- 
matics, one and one-half years of chemistry, and one year of physics. Specific 
courses to satisfy these requirements vary somewhat and should be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. For the B.A. degree, a minimum of 1 2 
semester hours of environmental science and engineering courses are required 
during the junior and senior years. The undergraduate B.A. double major curricu- 
lum has been designed with maximum flexibility and minimum specific require- 
ments to encourage interdepartmental study with all other fields of science and 
engineering. A list of suggested electives in various fields of science, engineering, 
humanities, and social science is available for students desiring additional gui- 
dance or specialization. 

The total number of semester hours required for the B.A. with a double major 
depends on departmental requirements for the other major. Generally, however, 
in addition to the departmental requirements for the majors, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Undergraduates interested in environmental engineering should contact the 
Department of Civil Engineering for information on the B.S. degree program with 
an environmental option. 



260 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The introductory course. Environmental Science 201, is intended for both 
majors and nonmajors. Humanities majors are encouraged to consider this course 
for science distribution requirements. 

Successful completion of the four-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor of 
Arts with environmental science as part of a double major qualifies the student for 
possible admission to a fifth year of specialized study leading to the professional 
degree of Master of Environmental Science (M.E.S.). Completion of a four-year 
curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in any field of engineering (civil and 
chemical preferred) qualifies the student for possible admission to a fifth year of 
specialized study leading to the professional degree of Master of Environmental 
Engineering (M.E.E). These recognized professional degrees in the environmental 
field are differentiated on the basis of science or engineering orientation and are 
described on page 129-130. Outstanding students wishing to pursue careers in 
teaching and research are qualified for graduate study after the B.A., B.S., M.E.S., 
M.E.E. , and M.S. degrees. 

Graduate Program. The graduate programs in environmental science and 
environmental engineering are interdepartmental activities and lead to the the 
M.E.E., M.E.S., Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Applicants 
for admission to the environmental science program may hold the baccalaureate 
or masters degree in any of the sciences or mathematics. Applicants for the 
environmental engineering program must hold accredited baccalaureate or 
master's degrees in an area of engineering. Although the main research activities in 
the department are concerned with ground water contamination, water and waste 
water engineering, water resources management, and applied water chemistry, the 
program serves as the focal point for universitywide study and research in the 
i?road human-environment problem spectrum. Faculty members from the Depart- 
ments of Chemical Engineering, Space Physics and Astronomy, Architecture, 
Biology, Geology, and Mathematical Sciences participate in this interdisciplinary 
research. Graduate students enrolled in any of these departments and interested in 
environmental problems for thesis topics may use facilities of the Department of 
Environmental Science and Engineering and are eligible for financial assistance in 
the form of graduate research assistantships and fellowships. 

Candidates for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees may 
pursue course programs designed to both complement and supplement their 
backgrounds through major and minor emphasis areas. However, formal minors 
are not required. University requirements for the advanced degrees are presented 
on pages 127-132. 

Graduate students in environmental science or engineering take the majority 
of their courses in other departments. A candidate for the Master of Science degree 
must complete a minimum of eight approved semester courses and present and 
defend, in oral examination, a research thesis. Normally, two academic years and 
the intervening summer are required for the degree. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy must demonstrate their competence 
in three areas corresponding to major and minor course emphasis. In particular, a 
candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy must: (1) complete a rigorous list of 
approved courses with high standing; (2) pass a preliminary examination to 
evaluate preparation for doctoral studies in the field of Environmental Science and 
Engineering; (3) pass a qualifying examination on course work, proposed research 
and related topics; (4) complete a thesis indicating the candidate's ability to do 



ENGINEERING/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 261 

AND ENGINEERING 

original research; and (5) pass a formal public oral examination on the thesis and 
related topics. 

Environmental Science and Engineering 

Environmental Science and Engineering Courses 

201a. Introduction to Environmental Systems (3-3-4). 

Chemical, physical, and biological components of the environment and the effects of 
pollution on their maintenance and utilization. Also offered as Health Education 201. 

Mr. Ward 

401a. Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (3-3-4). 

Fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and measurements. 

Mr. Tomson 

403a. Water and Wastewater Treatment (3-0-3). 

Fundamental principles of water and wastewater treatment systems and their applica- 
tion to the design and operation of treatment plants. 

Mr. Andrews 

406b. Introduction to Environmental Law (3-0-3). 

Legal techniques used by societies to plan and regulate the use of environmental 
resources. 

Mr. Blackburn 

412b. Hydrology and Watershed Analysis (3-3-4). 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrograph techniques, flood routing, and open 
channel flow; local watershed application and laboratory. Also offered as Civil Engineering 
464. 

Mr. Bedient 

443a. Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of meteorology, climatology, and predictive meteorology and climatolo- 
gy. Also offered as Space Physics 443 and Mechanical Engineering 477. 

Mr. Few 

445a. Natural Environmental Factors in Community Development (3-0-3). 

Readings, discussion, and review of data sources on natural environmental factors 
affecting and affected by the development of the built environment. Also offered as Architec- 
ture 645. 

Mr. Blackburn 

490a,b. Special Study and Research (Variable). 

Open to environmental science or engineering majors with permission of chairman. 
Written thesis required. 

511a. Environmental Physiology and Toxicology (3-0-3). 

Physical and chemical environment as it affects the physiology and population dynam- 
ics of organisms (including humans). Stability and maintenance of biogeochemical cycles. 
(University of Texas School of Public Health). Not available to undergraduates. 

512b. Environmental Physiology and Toxicology (3-0-3). 

See Environmental 511. (University of Texas School of Public Health). Not available to 
undergraduates. 



262 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

518a. Ground Water Hydrology (3-0-3). 

Ground water hydrology, hydrogeology, well mechanics, and hydraulics. Pollutant 
transport in aquifer systems, numerical methods, and ground water models. Topics include 
flow in porous media, well mechanics, water quality, geology. Concepts of pollutant trans- 
port in aquifer systems, numerical methods, and computer applications are covered in detail. 

Mr. Bedient 

536b. Biological Processes for Wastewater Treatment (3-0-3). 

Theory and application of biological processes as used in wastewater treatment. An 
introduction to mathematical modeling, computer simulation, reactor design, and process 
dynamics and control as they apply to wastewater treatment. 

Mr. Andrews 

550b. Applied Water Chemistry (3-0-3). 

Designed to provide a theoretical basis for considering the chemistry of natural and 
waste waters and treatment processes. 

Mr. Tomson 

564b. Atmospheric Dynamics (3-0-3). 
See Space Physics 564. 

Mr. Few 

590a,b. M.E.E. and M.E.S. Special Study and Research (Vainable) 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in environmental engineering 
under the direction of a selected faculty member. Preparation of a formal report and an oral 
presentation of the results are required. 

601a. Seminar (3-0-3). 

Continuing seminar on environmental research. 

602b. Seminar (3-0-3). 

See Environmental Science and Engineering 60 1 . ^ 

631a. Water Treatment Systems (Variable). 

Emphasizes dynamics and control of water and wasterwater systems. An advanced 
topics course. 

Mr. Andrews 

632b. Water and Wastewater Systems (Variable). 
See Environmental Science and Engineering 631. 

Mr. Andrews 

634a. Ground Water Transport (3-0-3). 

Formal lecture and student projects, literature review. Ground water transport theory, 
water quality models, analytical and numerical techniques, computer applications. Formal 
lecture and student projects, literature review. An advanced topics course. 

Mr. Bedient 

635a. Water Chemistry (Variable). 

Formal lecture and assigned reading in topics such as redox kinetics and thermodynam- 
ics, absorption and desorption, and the associated mathematics. An advanced topics course. 

Mr. Tomson 

636b. Water Chemistry (Variable). 

See Environmental Science and Engineering 635. 

Mr. Tomson 

651a. Master's Research and Thesis (Variable). 



ENGINEERING/MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 263 

652b. Master's Research and Thesis (Variable). 
800a,b. Ph.D. Research And Thesis (Variable). 

Mathematical Sciences 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor Wang, Chair 

Professors Akin, Bixby, S.H. Davis, de Figueiredo, Dennis, Miele, Pfeiffer, 

D. W. Scott, Symes, Tapia, J. R. Thompson, Walker, Wheeler, and Young 

Adjunct Professors Glowinski, Kendall, Middleton, Morshedi, Peaceman 

Assistant Professor Boyd 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A.Ma.Sc, M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The program allows each student considerable free- 
dom to plan a course of study consistent with his or her particular interests in 
mathematics and its applications. Available courses provide foundations for 
applications to many fields of engineering, physical sciences, life sciences, behav- 
ioral and social sciences, and computer science. 

Within the flexible framework of University requirements, the program 
consists of three parts: ( 1 ) basic courses in mathematics and computer science, (2) 
introductory courses in appropriate areas of mathematical sciences, and (3) elec- 
tives for which major credit is given. 

1 . Students normally take eight basic courses, as follows: 
Calculus — Mathematics 101, 102 (or honors equivalent); 
Differential equations — Mathematics 211; 
Multivariable calculus — Mathematics 2 1 2; 

Linear algebra — Mathematics 355 or Mathematical Sciences 310; 
Discrete mathematics — Computer Science 280 or Mathematics 356; 
Computer programming — Computer Science 211 or 2 1 2; 
Model building — Statistics 300, 301, or approved alternate. 

2. Students take one course in three of the following areas: 
Computing — At least three hours of Computer Science in addition to the 
above; 

Numerical analysis — Mathematical Sciences 353, 451, 452, or 454; 
Operations research/optimization — Mathematical Sciences 460, 471, 
472, 475, or 476; or Economics 472. 

Physical mathematics: Mathematical Sciences 330 or 340, or Mathemat- 
ics 381 or 382; 
Applied probability: Mathematical Sciences 381, or Statistics 382. 

3. Students also take elective courses for credit toward the mathematical 
sciences major, as follows: 

Two additional courses in one of the areas selected above; 



264 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

One further course in mathematical sciences, computer science, statis- 
tics, or mathematics; 

Approved electives to bring total major requirements to 59 semester 
hours. 

In addition to departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy University distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 
semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at 
least 120 semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

A student contemplating a major in Mathematical Sciences is encouraged to 
contact any member of the Department, particularly a member of its undergradu- 
ate committee. A faculty member will help the student explore possible programs 
suited to his or her individual needs and interests. 

The Department of Mathematical Sciences participates in the interdiscipli- 
nary program in Managerial Studies. More information may be obtained from the 
description Managerial Studies program on page 346. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in mathematical sciences is 
open to qualified students holding bachelor's or master's degrees (or their 
equivalent) in engineering, mathematics, or physical, biological, mathematical, or 
behavioral sciences. The credentials of each applicant will receive individual 
evaluation by the faculty of the department. A complete application folder should 
mclude the quantitative, verbal, and advanced scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination, all transcripts, and evidence of proficiency in English (such as the 
TOEFL) where appropriate. 

The graduate program is designed for students seeking the professional degree 
of Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences or the research degrees of Master of 
Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. It normally takes one or two years to obtain a 
master's and three or four years to obtain a doctorate. A master's degree is not a 
prerequisite for the doctoral degree. 

The professional degree emphasizes the applied aspects of the mathematical 
sciences. This degree is intended for persons who plan careers as practitioners 
rather than primarily as researchers. Presently, this degree emphasizes the follow 
mg areas, singly or in combination: (1) general applied mathematics, (2) opera- 
tions research, and (3) numerical analysis. Further information about this degree 
may be obtained from the Department. 

The granting of a research degree presupposes demonstrated ability to do 
advanced original research. Students are encouraged to initiate research activities 
at the eariiest possible time in their graduate study. Presently, the research inter- 
ests of the faculty are in the following four major areas: ( 1 ) numerical analysis and 
computation, (2) physical mathematics, (3) operations research, (4) mathematical 
modeling in physical, biological, or behavioral sciences. Further information 
about these areas may be obtained from the department. 

Graduate fellowships, research assistantships, and graduate scholarships are 
available and are awarded on the basis of merit to qualified students. Current 
practice in the department is for most doctoral students in good standing to receive 
some financial aid. As an integral part of their scholastic programs, all graduate 
students are expected to attain some proficiency in teaching by engaging in 
instructional assignments of the Department. 



ENGINEERING/MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 265 

Requirements for the Degree of Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of at least 30 semester hours of coursework 
approved by the department. 

2. At most two courses may be at the 300- (junior) level; at most two may be 
taken outside the department; and at most two courses may be 
transferred. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of at least 30 semester hours (including thesis) at 
the graduate level. Normally five courses must be in Mathematical 
Sciences. 

2. An original thesis acceptable to the department. Note, however, that 
successful performance on the qualifying examination fulfills the 
master's thesis requirement for a student working toward the Ph.D. 
degree. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a public oral examination on the thesis; the 
procedure for the public oral examination is given in the general rules of 
the University. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of courses of study approved by the department. 
At least two courses outside the major area are required. 

2. Satisfactory performance on preliminary and qualifying examinations 
and reviews. 

3. Satisfactory completion of two semester courses or a reading examina- 
tion on an approved foreignlanguage. 

4. An original thesis acceptable to thedepartment. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final public oral examination on the thesis; 
the procedure is given in the general rules of the University. 



Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematical Sciences Courses 

223. Introduction to Computing (Variable). 

A self-paced, variable-credit course in the use of the programming languages APL and 
FORTRAN 77 to solve technical problems. The course is divided into four parts: basic and 
advanced levels of the use of each language. Each part may be taken in separate semesters, 
with either language taken first. No more than four hours of credit may be taken. Numerical 
techniques for solving systems equations and computer graphics are emphasized. 

310. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Concepts and results of linear algebra useful in a variety of fields of application. 

330. Complex Variables (3-0-3). 

Introduction to basic concepts of complex variable theory and applications to the 
solution of physical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. 

340. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

Elementary methods for the solution of partial differential equations and boundary 
value problems in engineering and physical sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematical 211. 



266 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

353. Computational Numerical Analysis (3-0-3). 

An introductory course in numerical analysis with computer applications. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211. 

376. Quantitative Analysis (3-0-3). 

Mathematical models in deterministic and stochastic situations, including linear 
programing, inventory theory, decision theory, waiting line theory. Prerequisite: a statistics 
course. 

381. Introduction to Applied Probability (3-0-3). 

Concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications of modem 
probability theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. Also offered as Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 331 and Statistics 381. 

41 1. Group Theory for Chemists and Physicists I (3-0-3) 

Symmetries of physical laws and structures and associated transformation groups. 
Applications to problems in atomic, solid state, and molecular physics and chemistry. 
Prerequisite: linear algebra and elementary quantum mechanics. Not offered every year. 

417. Combinational Analysis (3-0-3) 

Solution of enumeration problems using the methods of inclusion and exclusion, 
generating functions, distributions, permutations, and graphical enumeration. Not offered 
every year. 

432. Tensor Analysis (3-0-3). 

Review of linear algebra. Tensor algebra. Tensor analysis on Euclidean spaces. Applica- 
tions to particle mechanics, continuum mechanics, and electromagnetic theory. Prerequi- 
site: linear algebra. Not offered every year. 

440. Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering (3-0-3) ^ 

Application of linear operator theory and transform techniques in the solution of 
ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 330 or 
Mathematics 382. Not offered every year. 

451. Numerical Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

A study of numerical methods in linear algebra. 

452. Computational Methods for Differential Equations (4-0-4). 

Finite difference, variational, and collocation methods for approximating numerically 
the solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Computer implementation to 
verify convergence to the solution. 

453. Numerical Analysis of Ordinary Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

Runge-Kutta, linear, multistep methods; stability analysis and stiffness for initial-value 
problems; finite difference, finite element, collocation, and shooting methods for two-point 
boundary value problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. 

454. Computational Methods for Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3). 

Analysis and computer applications of modern methods for solving nonlinear algebraic 
systems and nonlinear constrained optimization problems in R . Prerequisite: Mathematics 
211,212, linear algebra. 

460. Optimization Theory (3-0-3). 

Derivation and application of necessity conditions and sufficiency conditions for 
constrained optimization problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212 and linear algebra. 



ENGINEERING/MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 267 

471. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method; revised simplex 
method; duality theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition tech- 
niques. Also offered as Economics 47 1 . 

472. Game Theory and Decision Analysis (3-0-3). 

Matrix games; relation to linear programming; nonzero sum games; games against 
nature; decision trees; models for group decisions; utility theory; benefit-cost models. Not 
offered every year. 

475. Operations Research, Deterministic Models (3-0-3). 

Optimization problems in a managerial and economic context. Familiarity with linear 
programming and microeconomic theory is strongly recommended. Also offered as Econom- 
ics 475. 

476. Operations Research, Stochastic Models (3-0-3). 

Decision theory, waiting line theory, Markov chains, inventory models, replacement 
models, simulation. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381 or Statistics 382. Also offered 
as Economics 476. 

477. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory I (3-0-3) 

Exposition of the theory of competitive economies from a mathematical perspective, 
unifying calculus, matrix algebra, and set-theoretic approaches. Prerequisite: Economics 
211, Mathematics 212, Mathematical Sciences 310. Also offered as Economics 477. Not 
offered every year. 

478. Mathematical Structure of Economic Theory II (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Economics/Mathematical Sciences 477, which is a prerequisite. Also 
offered as Economics 478. Not offered every year. 

483. Markov and Martingale Sequences. Renewal Processes (3-0-3) 

The Markov property and Markov sequences. Discrete-parameter martingales. Poisson 
and other renewal processes. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381. Also offered as 
Statistics 483. Not offered every year. 

490a. Independent Study (Variable). 

491b. Independent Study (Variable). 

533. Advanced Tensor Analysis (3-0-3). 

Differential and integral calculus on manifolds. Riemannian geometry. Calculus of 
variations. Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Applications to analytical mechanics, relativity and 
continuum mechanics. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 432. Offered occasionally. 

535. Mathematical Theory of Nonlinear Elasticity (3-0-3) 

Representation theory for the constitutive relations for elasticity; homogeneous and 
inhomogeneous bodies; wave propagation; second-order elasticity and approximations. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 511, 512, or Mathematical Sciences 432. Offered 
occasionally. 

540. Applied Functional Analysis (3-0-3) 

Applications of basic concepts and theorems in functional analysis to mechanics, 
quantum mechanics, and/or optimal control problems. 

541. Introduction to Linear Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3) 
Distributions, Sobolev spaces, pseudodifferential operators. Interior estimates for 

elliptic systems; well-posedness of hyperbolic initial value problems; propagation of singu- 
larities. Boundary regularity for second-order elliptic equations. 



268 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

542. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3) 
Selected topics. Sequel to 541. 

544. Mathematical Methods of Physics (3-0-3) 

Selected mathematical techniques useful in the solution of problems in physics and 
space physics. Prerequisite: Physics 301, 302; Mathematical Sciences 440 is recommended 
Not offered every year. 

551. Advanced Numerical Linear Algebra (3-0-3) 

The content of this course varies from year to year. It may be repeated if the change in 
content justifies. 

552. Numerical Methods Partial Differential Equations I (3-0-3). 

Analysis of modern numerical methods, including finite-difference methods finite- 
element methods, collocation methods, and associated algebraic problems Not offered 
every year. 

553. Numerical Methods Partial Differential Equations II (3-0-3). 
Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 552. 

554. Numerical Nonlinear Programming (3-0-3). 

Analysis of modern numerical methods for constrained problems, including variable 
metric methods, sucessive quadratic programming, and trust region methods Nor offered 
every year. 

563. Engineering Approach to Mathematical Program (3-0-3). , 
Minimization of functions of variables which are either unconstrained, or subject to 

equality constraints, or subject to inequality constraints, or subject to both equality and 
inequality constraints. Analytical methods: first-order conditions and second-order condi- 
tions. Numerical methods: first-order methods and second order methods Also offered as 
Mechanical Engineering 563. 

564. Engineering Approach to Optimal Control (3-0-3). 

Optimal control theory and calculus of variations. Minimization of fuctionals depend- 
ing on variables subject to differential constraints. Numerical methods- first-order methods 
and second-order methods. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 564. 

571. Topics in Linear Programming (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 471. Advanced topics in mathematical struc- 
ture of linearprogramming. Special emphasis on applications in management and econom- 
ics. Not offeied every year. 

572. Topics in Theory of Games (3-0-3) 

Utility theory; theory of two-person general-sum games; bargaining and threats Theory 
of n-person games; solution concepts and extensions. Optional topics. Not offered everv 
year. ^ 

573. Nonlinear Programming (3-0-3) 

Theory and computational methods for nonlinear programming, including: Kuhn- 
Tucker conditions, duality theory, methods for constrained optimization of convex and 
nonconvex problems. Also offered as Economics 573. Not offered every year. 

574. Integer Programming (3-0-3) 

Applications, theory and computational methods in pure and mixed integer program- 
ming. Special problem structures. Not offered every year. 



ENGINEERING/MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 269 

581. Mathematical Probability I (3-0-3). 

Measure-theoretic foundations of probability for students who need access to advanced 
mathematical literature in probability and random processes. Open to qualified undergradu- 
ates. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 381. Also offered as Statistics 581. 

582. Mathematical Probability II (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Mathematical Sciences 58 1 . Also offered as Statistics 582. 

583. Introduction to Random Processes and Applications (3-0-3). 
Formulation, analysis, representations, and applications of some standard random 

processes. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 38 1 . Recommended: Mathematical Sciences 
581 or a course in real variable theory. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 
533 and Statistics 583. 

584. Estimation Theory (3-0-3). 

Maximum likelihood and Bayesian vector parameter estimation. Minimum mean 
square error estimation. Time series analysis. Algorithms based on state variable and ARMA 
models for signal estimation, model identification, and spectral estimation. Prerequisite: 
Mathematical Sciences 381 (583 recommended). Also offered as Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 534 and Statistics 584. Not offered every year. 

585. Information and Coding Theory (3-0-3). 

See Electrical and Computer Engineering 535. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 
381. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 535. 

587. Advanced Stochastic Processes (3-0-3) 

Measure-theoretic probability. Separability and measurability. Analytic properties of 
sample functions. Standard properties of second-order processes. Continuous-parameter 
Markov processes and martingales. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 581 or 583. Also 
offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 587. Not offered every year. 

590a, 591b. Topics in Operations Research (3-0-3 each semester). 

592a, 593b. Topics in Applied Mathematics (3-0-3 each semester). 

594a, 595b. Topics in Applied Probability (3-0-3 each semester). 

596a, 597b. Special Topics in Mathematical Sciences (3-0-3 each semester). 
Independent study. 

617. Continuum Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in continuum mechanics. Theory of constitutive equations. Theories 
of fading memory. Thermodynamics of materials with memory. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 511,512. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 6 1 7. Not offered every year. 

618. Continuum Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Recent developments in continuum mechanics. Typical topics: irreversible thermody- 
namics; electromagnetic interaction with general materials; theories of mixtures, continuum 
dislocation theories. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 617. Also offered as Mechanical 
Engineering 618. Offered occasionally. 

652. Topics in Numerical Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

The content of this course varies from year to year. It may be repeated if the change of 
content justifies. 

654. Topics in Optimization (3-0-3). 
Content varies from year to year. 



270 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
800a,b,c. Thesis (Variable). 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

Professor J.E. Akin, Chair 

Professors Brotzen, Chapman, Cheatham, McLelian, 

Mieie, J.M. Roberts, Spanos, Walker, Wang, and Wierum 

Associate Professors Bayazitoglu and Pharr 

Assistant Professors Angel and Cohen 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.M.E., B.S.M.S., M.M.E., M.M.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduate programs offered by this Depart- 
ment lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (with a major in mechanical engineer- 
ing or materials science and engineering), Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering, and Bachelor of Science in Materials Science. 

The programs in mechanical engineering may, by proper choice of electives, 
lead to specialization in one of several options: thermal sciences ancj energy 
conversion, gas dynamics, hydrodynamics, stress analysis and mechanical behav- 
ior of materials, aerospace engineering, and materials engineering. The programs 
in materials science and engineering provide the student with knowledge of the 
fabrication, structure, and properties of materials used by engineers. The B.A. 
programs are highly flexible, involve less technical content, and allow the student 
to pursue more deeply areas of interest outside of engineering. The B.S. programs, 
both accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, have 
higher content of technical courses and prepare the student for the professional 
practice of engineering. 

The senior year of the B.S. program in mechanical engineering provides a 
capstone design experience for mechanical engineering majors. Senior mechanical 
engineering students are required to complete a major design project in addition to 
course work in computer-aided design and design applications. 

The basic University i equirements for the B.A. and B.S. programs are summa- 
rized under Degree Requirements and Majors (pp. 62-82) and Engineering and 
Applied Science (page 231). The detailed requirements are summarized below. 
Lists of representative courses and their normal sequence during the stu- 
dents'undergraduate years are available from the department for either the B.A. or 
B.S. programs in both mechanical engineering or materials science and 
engineering. 

Students seeking the B.A. degree with a major in mechanical engineering must 
satisfy the University distribution requirements while completing not less than 75 
semester hours in courses specified by the department and not less than 60 
additional semester hours. Those seeking the B.A. degree with a major in materials 
science must satisfy the University distribution requirements while completing 
not less than 54 semester hours in courses specified by the department and not less 
than 75 additional semester hours. 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 271 

Students seeking the accredited B.S. in Mechanical Engineering must satisfy 
the University distribution requirements while completing not less than 42 semes- 
ter hours in courses unspecified by the Department and not less than the 92 
semester hours comprised by the following courses. 

Mathematics 101, 102, 21 1, 212 

Mathematical Sciences 223, 340 

Physics 101, 102, and 132 

Chemistry 101, 102, 107 

Engineering 200, 21 1, 241 

Materials Science 301, 304 

Mechanical Engineering 31 1, 314, 331, 332, 340, 371, 372, 401, 403, 404, 

411,412,431,471,481 

Approved major design elective of three semester hours. 

Students seeking the accredited B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering 
must satisfy the University distribution requirements while completing not less 
than 47 semester hours in courses unspecified by the Department and not less than 
the 87 semester hours comprised by the following courses: 

Mathematics 101, 102, 211,212 

Physics 101, 102, and 132 

Chemistry 101, 102, and 107 

Engineering 211,241 

Materials Science 301, 303, 401, 402, 406, 411, 535, and 537 

One of the following: Engineering 240, Mathematical Sciences 223, Computer 
Science 2 1 1 

One of the following: Mathmatical Sciences 340, 343 

One of the following: Materials Science 245, Engineering 200, Chemistry 3 1 1 

One engineering elective 

Additional course requirements for the Engineering Materials Option: 

Materials Science 404 

Two Materials Science electives 

One of the following: Materials Science 543, 561, 562 

One of the following: Mechanical Engineering 311, Civil Engineering 300 

One approved science elective 

Additional courses required for the Electronic Materials Option: 

Electrical Engineering 342, 462 

Physics 201 

One of the following: Electrical Engineering 459, Physics 31 1 

One Materials Science elective 

A suggested sequence in which courses should be taken is available from the 
Department. 

Professional and Graduate Programs. Advanced level programs offered by this 
department lead to the professional degrees of Master of Mechanical Engineering 
and Master of Materials Science and to the research degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy in either mechanical engineering or materials science. 

The professional degrees involve a fifth year of specialized study, integrated 
with the four prior years leading to either the B.A. or B.S. degrees in the same areas 
of interest described in the foregoing discussion of the undergraduate programs. 



272 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The professional programs are open to students who have shown academic excel- 
lence in their undergraduate studies. Detailed University requirements for profes- 
sional degrees are described under Professional Degrees (pp. 127-1 36) and involve 
the successful completion of 30 semester hours of course work. Suggested lists of 
courses are available from the department; however, specific programs are devel- 
oped for each student according to interest. 

The programs leading to the research degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. are open to 
students who have demonstrated outstanding performance in their undergraduate 
studies. The general University requirements for these degrees are outlined under 
Requirements for Research Degrees (pp. 126-127). Specific course requirements 
are variable, depending on preparation and performance in courses and on quali- 
fying examinations, etc. The granting of a graduate degree presupposes superior 
quality academic work and a demonstrated ability to do original research. For both 
the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, a thesis must be presented that comprises an original 
contribution to knowledge, and it must be defended in a public oral examination. 

The research interests of the faculty and the laboratory equipment available 
provide the following areas of specialization: ( 1 ) engineering mechanics; (2) mater- 
ials science; (3) fluid dynamics, gas dynamics, heat transfer, physical oceanogra- 
phy; (4) aeroastronautics; (5) computer-aided design; and (6) computational 
mechanics. 



Mechanical Engineering Courses 

301. Numerical Analysis 

Not offered every year. 

311a. Mechanics of Deformable Solids (3-0-3). 

Analysis of stress and deformation of solids with applications to beams, circular shafts, 
and columns. Prerequisite: Engineering 211. 

Mr. Angel 

312b. Advanced Mechanics of Deformable Solids (3-0-3) 

Torsion of Noncircular sections, axially symmetric problems, beams on elastic founda- 
tions, energy methods, elastic stability, numerical methods. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engi- 
neering 3 1 1 or equivalent. Not offered every year. 

314b. Introduction to Mechanical Design (3-0-3). 

An introductory design course covering the design process, materials selection, and 
design methods. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 311. 

Staff 

331a. Junior Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

Static and impact testing of engineering materials. Beam deflection and shear center 
experiments are included. Strain gauges are applied and tested. 

Mr. .Angel 

332b. Junior Laboratory II (0-3- 1 ). 

Instruction in fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. 

Mr. U'ieriou 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 273 

340b,a. Industrial Process Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Practical experience in and observation of selected industrial processes. Sign-up in 
Mechanical Engineering Office. Prerequisite: mechanical engineering major 

Mr. Guidry 

343. Mechanical System Dynamics and Analysis (4-0-4) 

A study of the dynamics of mechanical systems and the development of the necessary 
analytical techniques. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

371a. Fluid Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to fluid statics and dynamics; the development of the fundamental equa- 
tions of fluid mechanics and their application to problems of engineering interest. Prerequi- 
site: Engineering 200, 211, Mathematics 212. 

Ms. Bayazitoglu 

372b. Fluid Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Mechanical 371 devoted to potential flow, lubrication, boundary 
layers, and turbulence. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 371. 

Mr. Walker 

378. Acoustics (3-0-3) 

Acoustic theory, atmospheric acoustics, room acoustics, attenuation, nonlinear effects, 
measurement techniques, transducers, and acoustical standards. Also offered as Electrical 
and Computer Engineering 308. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

401a. Mechanical Design Applications (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 314. 

Mr. Cheatham 

403a. Computer Aided Design (3-0-3). 

Integration of the computer into the area of design. Optimization, simulation, finite 
elements, expert systems, etc. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 301. 

Mr. Akin 

404b. Materials Engineering and Design (0- 1 2-4). 

Technological aspects of materials selections, design, failure, and analysis. Laboratory 
time is spent in an industrial setting. Limited to materials science majors except by special 
arrangement. Prerequisite: Materials Science 301. 

Staff 

406a. Measurement And Control (3-3-4). 

Instrumentation methods, analogs, analysis of experimental results, applications in 
controls. Also offered as Civil Engineering 406. 

Mr. Bourland 

411a. Analytical Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Application of energy methods in the study of particle and rigid-body dynamics, electric 
circuits, electromechanical systems, and continuous dynamic systems. Prerequisite: Engi- 
neering 211. 

Mr. Spanos 

412b. Vibrations (3-0-3). 

Analysis of discrete and continuous linear, mechanical, vibrating systems with particu- 
lar emphasis upon multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Approximate methods are included. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 41 1. 

Mr. Spanos 



274 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

431a. Senior Laboratory I (0-3- 1 ). 

Instruction in gasdynamics, heat transfer, applied thermodynamics, and engine cycles. 

Staff 

432b. Senior Laboratory II (0-3- 1 ) 

Independent laboratory design and performance of research project of the student's 
choice under the direction of a staff member. 

Staff 

434b. Laboratory Project (0-9-3) 

Staff 

471a. Applications of Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Applications of thermodynamics to various systems of interest in mechanical engineer- 
ing with particular attention to energy conversion, refrigeration, and psychrometrics. Pre- 
requisite: Engineering 200. 

Mr. Chapman 

472a. Thermal Systems Design (3-0-3). 

Design and synthesis of systems based on applications of thermodynamics, fluid 
mechanics, heat transfer, economics, and optimization theories. Prerequisite: Engineering 
200, Mechanical Engineering 371, 372, 471, 481. 

Mr. Walker 

475a. Modeling and Model Testing (3-0-3) 

Modeling laws for different flow phenomena are derived, and accuracy of test data is 
established. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

476b. Fluid Machinery (3-0-3). 

Continuous-flow machinery analysis and design problems. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 371. 

Staff 

477a. Introduction of Atmospheric Science (3-0-3) 

Fundamentals of meteorology and climatology including radiation transfer. Also of- 
fered as Environmental Science and Engineering 443 and Space Physics 443. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

478b. Atmospheric Dynamics (3-0-3) 

Hydrodynamic equations of motion on a rotating planet are derived and solutions 
demonstrated for static, stable, perturbed, and unstable flows. Also offered as Environmen- 
tal Science and Engineering 444 and Space Physics 444. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

479b. Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3-0-3) 

Human health effects; sources of air pollution. Properties and processes of the atmos- 
pheric medium: stability, turbulence, mixing transport of pollutants, radiation, 
photochemistry, aerosol physics, and precipitation. Also offered as Environmental Science 
and Engineering 405. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

481b. Heat Transfer (4-0-4). 

General study of the principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radia- 
tion and their application to problems of engineering practice. 

Mr. Chapman 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 275 

482. Thermal Environmental Engineering (3-0-3) 

Application of the principles of Thermodynamics and heat transfer to the analysis of 
human comfort. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 481. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

491. Computer Aid Kinematics of Machines (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 30 1 or equivalant and Engineering 211. 

Staff 

493. Computer Graphics and Descriptive Geometry (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 301 or equivalent. 

Staff 

496b. Robotics Laboratory (1-0-1 ). 

Computer vision experiments, programming a mobile robot and an industrial-type 
PUMA robot, operating a CNC mill and an industrial-size CNC lathe, projects. 

Mr. Cheatham 

498b. Introduction to Robotics (37O-3). 

A survey of topics in robotics including kinematics, dynamics and control theory 
applied to robotics. 

Mr. Cheatham 

501a. Analytical Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Graduate level version of Mechanical Engineering 41 1 . Offered concurrently with 411. 

Mr. Spanos 

502b. Vibrations (3-0-3). 

Graduate level version of Mechanical Engineering 412. Offered concurrently with 
Mechanical 412. 

Mr. Spanos 

508. Perturbation Methods (3-0-3) 

Approximate solutions of nonlinear equations using perturbation techniques. Not 
offered every year. 

Staff 

509b. Dynamic Analysis of Offshore Structures (3-0-3). 

Loads on offshore structures are described on deterministic and probabilistic basis. 
Methods are examined for calculating the structural response. Specific examples involving 
drill strings, marine risers, fixed and compliant structures are given. Also listed as Civil 
Engineering 509. 

Mr. Spanos 

510b. Elastodynamics (3-0-3). 

Propagation of waves in linearly-elastic strings, fluids, and solids. Surface waves, wave 
reflection and refraction at interfaces. Wave propagation in waveguides. Steady-state and 
transient half-space problems. Scattering of waves by cracks. 

Mr. Angel 

511b. Continuum Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Concepts and general principles common to all branches of solid and fluid mechanics. 
Applications include non-Newtonian fluid mechanics and nonlinear elasticity. 

Mr. Angel 



276 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

512. ElementsofContinum Mechanics II (3-0-3) 

Applications of the concepts developed in Mechanical Engineering 511. Topics selected 
from thermoelasticity. electroelasticity, viscoelasticity, nonequilibrium thermodynamics, 
and porous media theories. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

513b. Theory of Elasticity (3-0-3) 

Fundamentals of Imear elasticity and thermoelasticity. Applications include static and 
dynamic problems. Prerequisite: a first course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Not 
offered every year. 

Staff 

514a. Theoretical Plasticity (3-0-3) 

Isotropic and anistropic plastic flow; yield and loading surfaces, normality and convexi- 
ty requirement, and hardening rules; plane plastic flow problems and slip-line field theory. 
Also offered as Civil Engineering 514. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

515b. Structural Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Problems in limit analysis and design; plastic behavior of structures; flexure and torsion 
of prismatic members. Also offered as Civil Engineering 5 1 5. 

Mr. Merwin 

516. Advanced Dynamics (3-0-3) 

Dynamics of a particle and systems of particles. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

517b. Finite Element Methods (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the finite element analysis with applications to problems in fluid and 
solid mechanics. 

Mr. .Akin 

518b. Elements of Flow in Porous Media (3-0-3) 

Introduction to the dynamics of fluids flowing in deformable porous materials. Not 
offered every year. 

Staff 

521b. Flight Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the performance, stability, and control of flight vehicles. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

523b. Probabilistic Structural Dynamics (3-0-3). 
Also offered as Civil Engineering 523. 

Staff 

524b. Nonlinear Vibrations (3-0-3) 

Analytical and numberical methods of dealing with nonlinear vibration problems. A 
balance between physical intuition and mathematical regor is kept. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 4 12. 

Staff 

530b. Heat Exchanger Design (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the fundamentals of the thermal design of heat exchangers; the design of 
a heat exchanger for a specified application. 

Ms. Bayazitoglu 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 277 

^^* ■ A^^e^entatkTn of the basic scientific and engineering knowledge needed in the technical 
analysis of solar energy applications. Not offered every year. ^^^^^ 

537a Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3-0-3). 

See Electrical and Computer Engineering 537. ^^ Philippe 

S38b Exoert Systems Applied to Robotics (3-0-3). 

EngiSeringlpplications of artificial intelligence and expert systems to robotics and 

automation. ^/fl/T 

563a Eneineerine Approach to Mathematical Prograniing(3-0- 3). 

MinirfzatLn Sf functions of variables which are (1) unconstrained or (2 subjec to 
enualitv constraints or (3) subject to inequality constraints, or (4) subject to both equality 
and ineqSty cS^^^^ and numerical methods. Also offered as Mathematical 

Sciences 563. j^^ Miele 

ine on vSlSsuSect to differential constraints, non-differentia constraints, initial con- 
Sts and ^constraints. Analytical and numerical methods. Also offered as Mathemat- 
ical Sciences 564. ^^ Miele 

571a Ocean Fluid Dynamics and Meteorology I (3-0-3) . . , , p„„i„^^r 

introduction to the fundamentals of ocean motion. Prerequisite. Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 37rChem!?al Engineering 401, or Civil Engineering 463. Not offered every year. ^^^^^ 

^^'•^c^lSSJSSS^^^enng 571 with appl^tu^s to ^je s^ -d^d. 
namic response of structures. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 571. Not ottered every 
year. Staff 

^'*-EneTy'jSrn'S*?efourUs: convent.ona. conversion systems; central s,a,^n 
power from fossil fuels; povver plant design; alternative fuels; energy conversion systems. Not 
offered every year. ^taff 

^"'""kLTnctle/oSnamtcs, .hermodynamtcs and c^^^^^^ 

of the behavior of airbreathing and rocket propulsion devices. Not offered every year. ^^^^ 

'■'*-Smro^"phy"^i?and chemical processes of combustton w,th appl.cat.on. Not offered 
every year. staff 



278 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

591a. Gas Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of compressible, one-dimensional gas flows with area change normal 
shocks, friction, and heat addition; oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer flows Prereouisite- 
Mechanical Engineering 371. '-wuisuc. 

Mr. Chapman 

592b. Advanced Gasdynamics (3-0-3) 

Principles and application of generalized one-dimensional gas dynamics One-dimen- 
sional unsteady and two-dimensional steady compressible flows. Not offered every year 

Staff 

593a,b. Mechanical Engineering Problems (Variable). 

With approval, mechanical engineering students may elect an investigation or design 
project under the direction of a member of the staff 

Mr. Akin 

594. Advanced Aerodynamics (3-0-3) 

Development of theories for the prediction of aerodynamic forces and moments acting 
on airfoils, wing, and bodies and their design applications. Not offered every year 

Staff 

600a,b. Research and Thesis (Credit Variable) 

601a,b. Special Topics (Variable). 

602b,a. Special Topics (Variable). 

603a,b. Special Topics (Variable). 

Computer graphics with applications in robotics. 



604a,b. Special Topics (Variable). 

605b,a. Special Topics (Variable). 
606a,b. Graduate Seminar (0). 



Mr. Cheatham 
Mr. Miele 

Mr. Akin 

617, 618 Continuum Mechanics I, II (3-0-3 eacg semester) 

Advanced topics in continuum mechanics. Not offered every year Prereouisite- 
Mechanical Engineering 511,512. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 61761 g^ "^• 

Staff 

626. Theory of Elasticity II (3-0-3) 

Special topics in the linear theory of elasticity. Not offered every year 

Staff 

627, General Theory of Shells (3-0-3) 

General linear theory of bending of elastic shells of arbitrary shape. Solution of 
problems of technical interest by exact and approximate methods. Not offered every year 

Staff 

671, 672 Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics I, II (3-0-3 each semester) 

Foundations of the thermodynamics of Irreversible processes. Not offered every year 

Staff 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 279 

673. Advanced Fluid Mechanics I (3-0-3). .. ^ . 

Mr. Cohen 

674a. Advanced Fluid Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Conservation equations for viscous compressible fluids. Applications to viscous and 
inviscid flows Vorticity theorems. Boundary layer flows. Low Reynolds number flows. 

Mr. Cohen 

675. Special Application of Fluid Dynamics (3-0-3) ^ n u 

Geostropic flows in oceanography investigated and applied to secondary flow phenom- 
ena of laminar and trubulent character. Not offered every year. 

676. Turbulence (3-0-3) r u ^ n h„or 
General introduction to turbulence covermg isotropic, free shear, and wall shear 

turbulence. Not offered every year. ^ 

676b. Computational Fluid Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Numerical methods for the solutions of the equations of fluid mechanics. Finite 
difference schemes, numerical grid generation, stability considerations. Prerequisite: 
Mechanical Engineering 673. ^^ Walker 

682a. Convective Heat Transfer (3-0-3). ,^ ^ 

Rigorous study ofthe transfer ofheat by free and forced convection. ^ ,a-ito lu 

683 Radiative Heat Transfer I (3-0-3) . ^ c v, u 

Rigorous study of the transfer of heat by radiant exchange in the absence of absorbing 
media. Not offered every year. ^^ Chapman 

684. Radiative Heat Transfer II (3-0-3) 

Radiative transfer in the presence of absorbing, emitting, and scattering media, com- 
bined radiation, conduction, and convection. Heat transfer in furnaces, fire propagation, 
and air pollution problems. Not offered every year. ^^^^^ 

*''V?ru£\ndtol'^'r^^^^^^^ -d muUidimensiona, conducon in 

different geometries. Not offered every year. ^^^rr 

697. Hypersonic Gasdynamics (3-0-3) 

Not offered every year. S/a/T 

698. Advanced Topics in Robotics _ 

Kinematics and dynamics, trajectory planning, control, vision and ^^^^^JS-^,^^^^;^^,,^ 

700c. Summer Graduate Research 

800a,b. Research and Thesis (Variable). ^^ ^^.^ 



280 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Materials Science Courses 

245a. Thermodynamics of Engineering Materials (3-0-3) 

Introduction to the kinetics and thermodynamics of engineering materials. 

Mr. McLellan 

301b. Materials Science (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the science of solid materials covering metals, ceramics plastics and 
semiconductors. The properties of solid materials from atomic and macroscopic points of 
view. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. ^ punub ui 

Staff 

303b. Materials Science Junior Laboratory (0-3- 1 ). 

Introductory laboratory course. Open to junior materials majors. 

Staff 

304a. Applied Materials Engineering (0-3- 1 ). 

Practical application of the basic principles of materials science, covering case studies 
of failures under a variety of conditions and topics in the fabrication and heat treatment of 
metallic materials. Prerequisite or corequisite: Material Science 301. 

Mr. Cunningham 

401a. Thermodynamics in Alloys (3-0-3). 

T>Ur.J\^^'^''^^^^^'''^ ^^^\'i^. *^ systems of solid solutions and intermetallic compounds 
2ddsfort?alt'matrns.''"""- ^^^^ '"^ ^^ --^-s in binary systems.'simple 

Mr. McLellan 

402a. Mechanical Properties of Materials (3-0-3) 

h.ho^''""'' fundamental properties of dislocations in crystals. Applications to mechanical 
behavior: creep, work hardening, internal friction, fracture, and other structure sensitive 
phenomena of materials. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 1. sensitive 

Mr. Roberts 

404b. Materials Engineering and Design (2-3-3) 

.■J^^''^''''}''^'''^\^f^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ selection, design, failure, and analysis. Laboratory 
time IS spent in an industrial setting. Prerequisite: Materials Science 395. 

Mr. Cunningham 

406b. Physical Properties of Solids (3-0-3) 

A,.\J'^^^l ^f S'^'^^"'^^!' magnetic, and optical properties of metals, semiconductors and 

dielectrics based upon elementary band theory concepts. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211 

Staff 

411b. Metallography and Phase Relations (3-0-3) 

oHH .^'^!'°^^'^''*"''^'u'^''''''' ""^y ^^ observed in metals and alloys; optical metallography in 
addition to more sophisticated techniques. Prerequisite: Materials Science 395. ^^^""^ '" 

Mr. McLellan 

415b. Ceramics and Glasses (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of ceramic and glassy materials, including phase relations theoretical 
39T(ciu;se noVhSed") ''^- '^°' ''^^''''^ '^"^ ^'''■- P'^^'-^l^'site: Materials Science 

Mr. Roberts 



ENGINEERING/MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS SCIENCE 28 1 

453b. Extractive and ChemicalMetallurgy 

Survey of nonclassical benefication, reduction, oxidation, and refining processes tor the 
preparation of research and reactor grade metals. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 and Engi- 
neering 200 or their equivalents. 

501a,b. Materials Science Seminar (0). 

A series of biweekly seminars on selected topics in Materials Science. 

Mr. Roberts 

502b. Imperfections in Solids (3-0-3) 

Point, line, and planar defects in ionic, homopolar, and metallic solids. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211. Mr Roberts 

535a Introduction to X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscropy(3-0-3). 

Study of crystals by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Basic 
diffraction theory and methods for characterization of structure and constitution of materi- 
als. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. m ■ Ph 

537a. X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy Laboratory (0-31). 

Selected laboratory experiments to complement the lecture material ot Materials 
Science 535. ^^ ^^^^^ 

541b. Physical Metallurgy (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of solidification, alloying, and heat treatment. The mechanical and 
nonmechanical properties of metallic systems from atomic and electronic theory. Prerequi- 
site: Materials Science 395. „ .,■ 

543b Physical Metallurgy Laboratory (3-0-1) 

Experiments to complement the course work of Materials Science 541. Prerequisite: 
Materials Science 54 1 . Staff 

550b. Time Dependent Plasticity (3-0-3) ,^ . u i^„v.i 

Fundamental concepts in creep and creep rupture in solids. A phenomenological 
overview and mechanistic theories are presented. Prerequisite: Materials Science 402 or 
permission of instructor. Not offered every year. ^ 

561a. Advanced Metallurgical Laboratory I (0-4-1). , ^ „ 

Students whose interest Ues primarily in the field of materials and metallurgy are given 
the opportunity for research in these fields. Prerequisite: permission °^ '"^^''"^^''^^^^^//^^ 

562b. Advanced Metallurgical Laboratory 11(0-4-1). , ^ „ ^ 

Students whose interest lies primarily in the field of materials and metallurgy are given 
the opportunity for research in these fields. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. ^^^^^ 

563a. Introduction to Solid-State Physics I (3-0-3) , ^ ,, r 

Fundamental concepts of crystalline solids, including crystal ^.^ructure. band theory of 

electrans, and lattice vibration theory. Also ottered as Electrical Engineering 563 and Physics 

563- Staff 



282 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

564b. Introduction to Solid-State Physics II (3-0-3) 1 

Continuation of Materials Science 563, including scattering of waves by crystals 
transport theory, and magnetic phenomena. Prerequisite: Materials Science 563 Also 
offered as Electrical Engineering 564 and Physics 564. 

Staff 

565. Special Topics in Solids I (3-0-3) 

Also offered as Electrical Engineering 565 and Physics 565. Not offered every year 

Staff 

566b. Crystalline Solids (3-0-3). 

Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 566 and Physics 566 

Staff 

567b. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3) 

Magnetic properties of solids. Diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism an- 
tilerromagnetism, and fernmagnetism. Nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic 
resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance. Also offered as Chemistry 567, Electrical Engineer- 
mg 567, and Physics 567. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

569b. Corrosion Science and Engineering (3-0-3) 

Survey of surface activity and corrosion processes on metals, semi conductor and 
msulatmg materials. Prerequisite: Materials Science 301. 

Mr. Cunningham 

593a. Polymers (3-0-3). 

Mr. Armeniades 

594b. Properties of Polymers (3-0-3). 

Basic concepts m macromolecular chemistry and physics and their application in the 
production, processmg, and use of synthetic polymers. Also offered as Chemical Eneineerine 
594. ^ ^ 

Mr. Armeniades 

604b. Defect Structure of Synthetic and Biological Polymers (3-0-3) 

Theory of disclinations in solids. Application of the theory to organic polymers liquid 
and Mobias crystals, and insect muscle. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

609. Fracture Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Theory of elasticity and theory of plasticity pertinent to Fracture Mechanics 

Staff 

610a. Crystal Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Potentials and third-order elastic constants will be discussed. The lattice dynamics of 
harmonic phonons and anharmonic perturbation expansion are included, as well as the 
contribution of electrons to the thermodynamic quantities. 

Staff 

610b. Crystal Thermodynamics (3-0-3) 

Potentials and third-order elastic constants will be discussed. The lattice dynamics of 
hermonic phonons and anharmonic perturbation expansion are included, as well as the 
contribution of electrons to the thermodynamic quantities. 

Staff 

614a,b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 



ENGLISH 283 

615a,b. Special Topics (Variable). 

Staff 

634a. Thermodynamics of Alloys (3-0-3). 

Relations between classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics applied to un- 
derstanding solid and liquid alloys. Solid-solid, liquid-solid, and gas-solid equilibria in 

metallurgy. 

Mr. McLeilan 

635b. Transformation in Alloys (3-0-3). 

Diffusion in metals and alloys. Mechanism and phenomenology of diffusion-controlled 
transformations. Precipitation from saturated alloys and liquid solutions. Transformations 

in heat treated alloys. . . , „ 

Mr. McLeilan 

646a. Mechanical Metallurgy (3-0-3) 

Elastic, plastic, and viscous behavior of metallic and nonmetallic solids. The interpreta- 
tion of mechanical behavior in terms of lattice-imperfection theory. Prerequisite: Materials 
Science 402 or 566. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

649. Ferromagnetic Theory and Devices (3-0-3) , „ 

Theory of magnetism. Magnetostatics. Dynamic behavior of magnetic materials. Mag- 
netic thin films. Magnetic tape cores. Device characteristics. Prerequisite: An introductory 
course in solid-state theory. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 567. Not offered every 

y^^^- Staff 

English 



Professor Isle, Chair 

Professors Apple, Chance, Doody, Doughtie, Grob, Huston, 

Meixner, Morris, Patten, Piper, Skura, Snow, and J.A. Ward 

Associate Professors Driskill, Wood 

Assistant Professors Lurie, Newfield 

Lecturers Tobin, Wallingford 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. A major in English requires 36 semester hours in 
English; at least 24 semester hours must be courses at or above the 300 level. A 
double major requires 30 semester hours in English, with at least 18 hours at the 
advanced level. All English majors must take Masters of English Literature (En- 
glish 251 , 252) as a preparatory survey. 

An English major must also take advanced courses in the following categories: 
( 1 ) six semester hours in English literature before 1 800, of which one course must 
be Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Milton; (2) three semester hours in English literature 
after 1 800; (3) three semester hours in American literature. 

It is recommended that all English majors take some formal instruction m 
English and American history and, if they plan to do graduate work, at least six 
semester hours at the advanced level in a foreign language. 



284 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

The Graduate Program. The graduate program in English is designed for 
thorough training of a limited number of carefully selected students. Both the M. A. 
and Ph.D. degrees are offered to students interested in all fields of British and 
American literature and in literary theory. 

As a part of their training, all graduate students are expected to serve as 
research assistants, to participate in the teaching activities of the department, or to 
assist the editor of Studies in English Literature, published by Rice University. 

Within the limits of available funds, graduate scholarships and fellowships are 
awarded to qualified students. Scholarships provide a waiver of tuition; fellow- 
ships include a stipend and a waiver of tuition. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. Students admitted to the 
graduate program may take the master's degree by meeting four requirements: 

1 . If they have not done so before entering the program, they must satisfac- 
torily complete at least 3 semester hours at the junior or senior level in the 
literature of a foreign language, not in translation, either at Rice or 
another accredited institution. 

2. They must satisfactorily complete at least 30 semester hours of graduate 
work in English, including six hours credit for the thesis. 

3. They must pass two three-hour qualifying examinations covering two of 
the following fields: British literature to 1660; British literature, 1660- 
1 900; and American literature to the present and British literature, 1 900 
to the present. These examinations may both be taken in the first year; at 
least one of them must be taken no later than the beginning of the 
student's third semester in the graduate program. 

4. They must complete a thesis of approximately 50 pages and must defend 
it in an oral examination. For students admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree, the requirement of a thesis will be waived. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the 
doctoral degree must complete five requirements: 

1 . If they have not done so before entering the program, they must satisfac- 
torily complete at least six semester hours at the junior or senior level in 
the literature of a foreign language, not in translation. Although this work 
may be done at Rice or another accredited institution, it should directly 
relate to the student's research interests, and it must be approved by the 
Graduate Studies Committee. 

2. They must satisfactorily complete at least 42 semester hours of course 
work in English, exclusive of the thesis. 

3. They must satisfactorily complete a set of qualifying examinations, 
which consists of three three-hour written examinations covering the 
following periods: (1) British literature to 1660; (2) British literature, 
1660-1900; and (3) American literature to the present and British litera- 
ture, 1 900 to the present. Although the timing and order of these exami- 
nations may vary, at least one of them must be taken by the beginning of a 
student's third semester in the graduate program; and it is expected that 
all three will be completed by the beginning of a student's fifth semester. 



ENGLISH 285 

4. They must satisfactorily complete a preliminary examination, which 
consists of a 6-hour written examination covering two chronologically 
contiguous fields of specialization chosen by the student from the follow- 
ing: (1) Old English; (2) Middle English; (3) Sixteenth Century including 
Shakespeare, Seventeenth Century including Shakespeare and Milton; 
(5) Restoration including Milton, Dryden, and Swift; (6) Eighteenth 
Century including Swift and Blake; (7) Romantic including Blake; (8) 
Victorian; (9) Modern British including T.S. Eliot; ( 1 0) American litera- 
ture from colonial to Henry James, inclusive; (11) Modern American 
including Henry James and T. S. Eliot; (12) Literary Theory: Plato to 
1 800; ( 1 3)Literary Theory: 1 800 to present. This examination will usual- 
ly be taken at the end of the second semester following completion of the 
qualifying examination. The examining committee may request a 1 -hour 
oral examination focusing on the written examination. 

5. They must complete a dissertation which demonstrates a capacity for 
independent work of high quality in either traditional scholarship, criti- 
cal interpretation, or critical theory; and they must pass an oral examina- 
tion on the thesis and related fields. 

In order to qualify for continuing financial aid, students must be approved for 
candidacy for the Ph.D. by the beginning of the seventh semester at Rice. To secure 
approval, they must satisfy the foreign language requirement, pass both the 
qualifying and the preliminary examinations, and have a dissertation prospectus 
approved by the department's graduate studies committee. 



English Courses 

101. Critical Reading and Writing (3-0-3). 

Analysis and discussion of literary texts: poetry, drama, prose, fiction. Students submit 
essays frequently. 

Staff 

102. Critical Reading and Writing (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Engl 101. with sections giving special emphasis to individual genres: 
fiction, drama, and poetry. 

Staff 

103. Basic Composition (3-0-3). 

Intended primarily for students whose English Competency Examination is below 
standard. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Tobin and Ms. Driskill 

104. Basic Composition (3-0-3). 

See English 103. Permission of instructor is required. 

Ms. Tobin and Ms. Driskill 

211. Introduction to Creative Writing (3-0-3) 

Discussion and analysis of student fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. 

Ms. Wood 



286 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

251. Major British Writers: Chaucer to 1800 (3-0-3). 

Readings in British major authors of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the 
eighteenth century. Required of English majors. Enrollment in each section limited. Turn in 
preference sheet to English Office. 

Mr. Piper, Mr. Huston, Ms. Skura 

252. Major British Writers: 1800 to Present (3-0-3). 

Readings in major British authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Required 
of English majors. Enrollment in each section limited. Turn in preference sheet to English 
Office. 

Mr. Morris, Mr. Newfield, Ms. Wallingford 

111. Aspects of Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

Modem literature in short story, drama, poetry, novel, and nonfiction, drawn from 
American, British, and European sources of the ninteenth and twentieth centuries. 

Mr. Ward 

272. Aspects of Modern Literature (3-0-3). 
See Engl 271. Offered in 1989-90 

302. Ballad and Folksong (3-0-3). 

About two-thirds of this course is devoted to British and American folk ballads; the rest 
surveys American folk lyrics, spirituals,work songs, and blues. Offered in 1989-90 

303b. Afro-American Literature (3-0-3). 

A survey of major literary works by Afro-Americans. Offered in 1989-90. 

304. Twentieth-Century Women Writers (3-0-3). 

Readings in Woolf, Gather, Porter, Lessing, Plath, Leverton, Rich, and others. 

Ms. Lurie 

305. Introduction to Women's Studies in Literature(3-0-3). 

Offered in 1989-90 

307. Science Fiction (3-0-3) 

A study of modem science fiction in its relation to fantasy and satire. Not open to 
freshmen. Offered in 1 989-90. 

308. Detective Fiction (3-0-3) 

Readings and discussions of representative examples of detective fiction, including 
works by Christie, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, and MacDonald. Offered in 1989-90. 

311. Fiction Writing (3-0-3). 

Discussion and analysis of student fiction. Prerequisite: permission of instmctor. 

Mr. Apple 

312. Fiction Writing (3-0-3). 
See English 311. 

Mr. Apple 

313. Dramatic Writing (3-0-3). 

The emphasis, depending on individual students, will be on the writing of drama in one 
of several of the chief modes of the performing arts: plays, films, musicals, opera, even dance. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor required. Offered in 1989-90. 



ENGLISH 287 

314. Poetry Writing (3-0-3). 

Extensive reading in modern poetry as well as regular practice in the writing of various 
forms will be required. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Wood. Ms. Lurie 

315. Expository Writing (3-0-3) 

A course in the composition of personal essays. Permission of instructor required. 
Offered in 1989-90. 

316. Writing in the Social Sciences (3-0-3). 

Ms. Driskill 

317. Technical Writing (3-0-3). 

Ms. Driskill 

321. Old English (3-0-3) 

An introduction to Old English language and literature of the seventh through eleventh 
centuries, with emphasis upon the major poems, read in the original ("The Wanderer," "The 
Seafarer") and the epic Beowulf, read in translation. Offered in 1989-90. 

323. Chaucer (3-0-3). 

Readings in the Canterbury Tales and other writings of Chaucer. 

Ms. Daichman 

328. Middle English Literature (3-0-3) 

Major works of the Middle English period exclusive of Chaucer. Offered in alternate 
years. 

Staff 

329. Sixteenth-Century British Literature (3-0-3) 

A survey focusing on the nondramatic works of Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, More, 
Wyatt, and their contemporaries. 

Mr. Bought ie 

334. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3-0-3). 

Close critical reading of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays with particular emphasis on 
the works of Marlowe and Jonson. 

Ms. Skura 

339. Shakespeare (3-0-3). 

Each semester representative plays including tragedies, comedies, histories, and 
romances will be read. 

Mr. Grob 



340. Shakespeare (3-0-3). 
See English 339. 



343. Seventeenth Century British Literature (3-0-3). 

Poetry and prose of the seventeenth century, excluding Milton. 



344. Milton (3-0-3) 

Major poems and prose of John Milton. 



Mr. Huston 



Mr. Snow 



Mr. Snow 



288 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

345. Restoration Literature (3-0-3) 

Drama, poetry, and prose of the latter part of the seventeeth century. Offered alternate 
years. Offered in 1989-90 

346. Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3-0-3) 

Major writers of the eighteenth century, with particular attention given to Swift, Pope, 
and Johnson. Offered in 1989-90. 

351. British Literature of the Romantic Period (3-0-3). 

The major writings of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 
Offered in 1989-90. 

357. British Literature of the Victorian Period (3-0-3) 

The poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Hopkins and the prose of Carlyle, 
Ruskin, Newman, Arnold, and Mill. Offered alternate years. Offered in 1989-90. 

361. Eighteenth-Century British Fiction (3-0-3). 

A course dealing chiefly in the novels of Fielding, Stern, Smollett, and Austen. Offered 
in 1989-90. 

362. Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3-0r3) 
The novel from Austen to Hardy. 

Mr. Doody 

363. Twentieth-Century British Fiction (3-0-3). 

Forster, Woolf, Lawrence, Joyce, and their contemporaries. Particular attention will be 
given to Ulysses. 

Mr. Doody 

364. Twentieth-Century British Poetry (3-0-3) 

Survey from 1890 to the present: emphasis on Hopkins, Yeats, Lawrence, Graves, 
Auden, Larkin, and Hughes. 

Ms. Wallingford 

367. Modern Drama: Ibsen to 1940 (3-0-3). 

Plays by Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Wilde, Shaw, Synge, O'Casey, Prandeilo, and T.S. 
Eliot. Offered in 1989-90. 

368. Modern Drama: 1940 to the Present (3-0-3). 

O'Neill, Miller, and Williams; French moderns; absurdism and recent trends. Offered 
in 1989-90. 

369. The Novel: Cervantes to 1900 (3-0-3). 

Major European fiction from Cervantes to Tolstory in translation. Offered in 1989-90. 

370. The Novel in the Twentieth Century (3-0-3). 

Major European and Latin American fiction of the twentieth century in translation. 
Offered in 1989-90. 

378. American Literature to 1860 (3-0-3). 

Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, and other American writers. 

Mr. Newfield 

379. American Literature: 1860-1910 (3-0-3). 

A study of Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, Henry James, and others. 

Mr. Ward 



ENGLISH 289 

383. American Fiction: 1910-40 (3-0-3). 

Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and their contemporaries. 

Mr. Doody 

384. American Fiction: 1940 to the Present (3-0-3). 

Survey with emphasis on the work of Bellow, Mailer, Barth, and Pynchon. 

Staff 

387. Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3-0-3). 

Frost, Pound, Eliot, and Stevens with some attention to the other poets of the twentieth 
century. 

Staff 

388. Contemporary American Poetry (3-0-3) 

Contemporary American poertry, beginning with Robert Lowell and including such 
poets as James Wright, John Ashbery, Mark Strand, and others. Offered alternate years. 
Offered in 1989-90. 

394. Structure of English Language (3-0-3). 
Also offered as Linguistics 395. 

Mr. Davis 

395. History of English Language (3-0-3). 
Also offered as Lmguistics 395. 

Mr. Mitchell 

396. Language and philosophy in Literature (3-0-3) 

Readings and discussions of issues in the philosophy of language: representation, 
metaphor, structure, speech. Among the writers studied will be Lacan, Derrida, Heidegger, 
Cassirer, Saussure, Wittgenstein, Plato, Aristotle. Offered alternate years. Offered in 1 989- 
90. 

399. Literary Criticism: History (3-0-3) 

A Survey of the history of literary criticism from Plato to the twentieth century. Offered 
alternate years. Offered in 1 989-90. 

400. Literary Criticism: Theory (3-0-3). 
Recent developments in critical theory. 

Mr. Newfield 

401. Topics in Literature: Theatre (3-0-3). 
Interpretation and Performance. 

Ms. Skura, Mr. Havens 

402. Topics in Literature: Literature and the Visual Arts (3-0-3). 

Mr. Snow 

403, 404. Studies in a Major British Author: (3-0-3). 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Offered in 1989-90. 

405, 406. Studies in a Major American Author (3-0-3 each semester). 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Offered in 1989-90. 

408. Studies in a Literary Type (3-0-3). Offered in 1989-90. 

411. Studies in Modern Literature: Contemporary British Drama (3-0-3) 

Mr. Von Lutz 



290 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

413. Studies in Literary Criticism: Marx/Feminism (3-0-3) 



416. Advanced Creative Writing: (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor required. 



421. Directed Reading (3-0-3). 

422. Directed Reading (3-0-3). 

423. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 

424. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 



Ms. Lurie, Mr. Newfield 

Mr. Apple. 
Mr. Isle 
Mr. Isle 
Mr. Isle 
Mr. Isle 



501. British and American Literature (Variable). 

Directed reading in a topic in British or American literature or literary theory. Graduate 
students may enroll for up to two semesters of directed reading for graduate credit. 

Mr. Isle 

502. British and American Literature (Variable). 
See English 501. 

Mr. Isle 

504. Twentieth-Century Women Writers (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 304. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Ms. Lurie 

510a. Graduate Seminar: 18th Century Literature (3-0-3). 

Mr. Piper 

510b. Graduate Seminar: Shakespeare: Sources and Backgrounds (3-0-3) 

Ms. Skura 

511. Graduate Seminar: Dreiser and Wharton (3-0-3). 

Mr. Ward 

512. Graduate Seminar: Conrad and Ford 

513. Graduate Seminar: Approaches to Teaching Writing (3-0-3). 

Ms. Driskill 

523. Chaucer (3-0-3). 

Ms. Daichman 

528. Middle English Literature (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of English 321 for graduate students. Additional readings, papers, 
or meeting to be assigned by the instructor. Offered alternature years. Offered in 1 989-90. 



ENGLISH 291 

529. 16th Century British Literature (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 329. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Doughtie 

534. Elizabethan & Jacobean Drama (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students to English 329. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Ms. Skura 

539. Shakespeare (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 339, 340. Additional readings, 
papers, or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Grob 

540 Shakespeare (3-0-3). 
See English 539. 

Mr. Huston 

543. Seventeenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 343. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Snow 

544. Milton (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 344. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Snow 

545. Restoration Literature (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 345. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. Offered in 1989-90. 

546. Eighteenth Century British Literature (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 346. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. Offered in 1989-90. 

551. British Literature, Romantic Period (3-0-3). Offered in 1989-91). 

557. British Literature of the Victorian Period (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 357. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. Offered in 1989-90. 

561. Eighteenth-Century British Fiction (3-0-3). 
Offered in 1989-90. 

562. Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 362. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Doody 

563. Twentieth-Century British Fiction (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 363. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Doody 



292 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

564. Twentieth Centuir-British Poetry (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 364. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Ms. Wallingford 

567. Modern Drama: Ibsen To 1940 (3-0-3). 
Offered in 1989-90. 

568. Modern Drama: 1940 to Present (3-0-3). 
Offered in 1989-90. 

578. American Literature to 1860 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 378. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Newfield 

579. American Literature 1860-1920 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 379. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Ward 

583. American Fiction: 1910-1940 (3-0-3).' 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 383. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Doody 

584. American Fiction 1940-Present (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 384. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Staff 

587. Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3-0-3). 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 387. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Staff 

599. Literary Criticism: History (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 399. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. Offered alternate years. Offered in 1989-90. 

600. Literary Criticism: Theory (3-0-3) 

An enriched version for graduate students of English 399. Additional readings, papers, 
or meetings to be assigned by the instructor. 

Mr. Newfield 

621. Directed Reading (3-0-3). 

Mr. Isle 

622. Directed Reading (3-0-3). 

Mr. Isle 



701. British and American Literature (Variable). 

Topics in British and American Literature or Literary Theory. 



702. British and American Literature (Variable). 



Mr. Isle 
Mr. Isle 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 293 

703. Research Leading to Candidacy (Variable). 

Topics in British and American Literary theory. To be taken after a student has 
completed departmental course requirements for the master's or doctorate, and before being 
admitted to candidacy. 

Mr. Isle 

704. Research Leading to Candidacy (Variable). 

Mr. Isle 

800b,a. Ph.D. Research and Thesis (Variable). 

To be taken after a student has been admitted to candidacy. 

Mr. Isle 

French and Italian 



Associate Professor D. Nelson, Chairman 

Professors Alcover, Carrington, and Raaphorst 

Associate Professors Aresu, Konrad, and Logan 

Assistant Professor Farrell 

Lecturer Caflisch 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

French 

Undergraduates may major in French, and there is a graduate program in 
French leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. A fully 
equipped language laboratory is in operation, and laboratory work is an important 
part of the elementary courses in French. 

Undergraduate Program. A minimum of 30 semester hours (ten courses) in 
advanced French courses is required for the major in French. However, only 24 
semester hours (eight courses) of advanced study are required for double majors or 
area majors. The following courses are required unless the student is exempted by 
his or her major adviser: French 30 1 , 302, 311, and 3 1 2. Students who have taken 
French 300- and 400-level courses cannot enroll simultaneously or afterwards in 
French 200-level courses for credit. Students with a diploma from French-speak- 
ing institutions must consult with the department before enrolling in courses. 

Students are urged to take some work in European history, English, another 
European literature, or other courses closely related to French literature and 
culture. All majors and prospective majors must have their programs approved by 
the undergraduate adviser. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

In addition to courses at the 100 and 200 levels, the department particularly 
recommends French 304 and 306 to meet the university distribution require- 
ments. These courses, designed to interest a wide range of students, are taught in 



294 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

English and do not require previous knowledge of French. They may be accepted 
for an area major when approved by the departments involved. 

An honors program in French is available to qualified students. For detailed 
information, they should consult their French instructor or the departmental 
adviser. The Clyde Ferguson Bull Traveling Fellowship is awarded each year to a 
graduating senior with a major or double major in French. The fellowship permits 
the recipient to spend an entire year in France. A $2,000 summer travel scholar- 
ship is presented each year by the Alliance Francaise for university students in the 
Houston area. Members of the department are available for discussion of the 
numerous programs of study and travel in France sponsored by both American 
and French institutions. There is an active chapter of the French honorary society 
of Pi Delta Phi and an active French club, Le Club des Hiboux. 

Graduate Programs. Admission to graduate study in French will be granted to 
a limited number of qualified students. A distinguished undergraduate record in 
the study of French literature and a capacity for independent work are essential. 
The award of advanced degrees is not based solely on accumulation of credits or 
compliance with formal requirements. Candidates are expected to attain a wide 
general knowledge of the appropriate history and literature and to demonstrate 
their command of the French language. In most cases, two years will be required 
for the completion of work for the degree of Master of Arts. All courses are given in 
French. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1. Completion with satisfactory standing of 24 hours (beyond B.A.) in 
advanced courses plus thesis work (6 semester hours). 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one language other 
than French (language to be approved by the department). 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations 
in French on the French authors indicated in a reading list provided. 

4. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the depart- 
ment. Normally, this will include 54 semester hours of course work plus 
36 hours for the thesis. For those already holding the degree of Master of 
Arts, the requirement would be 30 semester hours of course work plus 36 
hours for the thesis. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two languages 
other than French approved by the department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination 
on the authors indicated in a reading list provided and on the literature, 
culture, and civilization of France. The oral examination may be taken 
only after the successful completion of the written examination. Students 
have a choice between passing a preliminary examination in a second 
field of literature or taking at least one course in a closely related field 
approved by the graduate faculty. Maximum credit toward the Ph.D. 
degree for work in a "minor" field is limited to three hours. 

Note: Requirements 2 and 3 must be fulfilled one year before the submis- 
sion of a dissertation. 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 295 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the department; the disserta- 
tion is expected to represent an original contribution. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields. 

Note: Regardless of the type of appointment held by the graduate student, 
he or she may be required to undertake research or teaching assignments, 
depending upon the background of the graduate student and the needs of 
the department. 

French Courses 

101a,b. Elementary French I (3-1-4). 

Introductory French. Concentration on all four language skills. Supplemented by work 
in the language laboratory. Offered spring, fall 1988-89. 

Staff 

102a,b. Elementary French II (3- 1 -4). 

See French 101. Offered spring, fall 1988-89. 

Staff 

103a. Accelerated Elementary French (6-2-8). 

Accelerated review of French for those wishing to enter French 201 in the spring 
semester. Equivalent to French 101, 102. Offered fall 1988. 

Staff 

201a,b. Intermediate French I (3-0-3). 

Intense oral and written grammar review; literary and cultural readings serve as basis 
for class discussions and compositions. Prerequisite: French 1 02 for 20 1 and 20 1 for 202, or 
placement exam. Offered spring, fall 1988-89. 

Staff 

202a,b. Intermediate French II (3-0-3). 

See French 201. Offered spring, fall 1988-89. 

Staff 

301b,a. Advanced French Grammar (3-0-3). 

Intensive study of French grammar and syntax at the advanced level, with concentra- 
tion on idiomatic structures for the language and written practice of contemporary French. 
Required for French majors. Prerequisite: French 202 or placement exam. Offered spring, 
fall 1988-89. 

Staff 

302a,b. French Phonetics (3-0-3). 

Contrastive analysis of the French sound system, including such key areas as diction 
and articulation of French speech, with emphasis on class as well as laboratory practice. 
Required for French majors. Prerequisite: French 202 or placement exam. Offered spring, 
fall 1988-89. 

Ms. Alcover. Ms. Farrell 

303b. Advanced Conversation and Composition (3-0-3). 

Active practice of composition, oral analysis, and discussion based upon the reading of 
texts on selected issues and problems in contemporary French society. Prerequisite: French 
301 and 302 or placement exam. Offered spring 1989. 

Staff 



296 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

304a/b. The Intellectual Hero in the French Novel: Taught in English(3-0-3). 

Topics vary but usually include readings from Balzac, Flaubert, Huysmans, Sartre, 
Sellers, and Barthes. Offered irregularly. Does not count toward a French major. 

Ms. Logan 

305a/b. Commerical French (3-0-3) 

An introduction to French for careers and to commercial French, this course provides 
the essential vocabulary and syntax specific to the langauge of French-speaking business. 
Offered irregularly. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 303, or placement exam. 

Staff 

306b. Structures of Alienation: the Twentieth-Century French and World Novel 

in English (3-0-3). 

Beginning, ending, and meaning in contemporary fiction: the relationship between 
form and alienation in texts from such authors as Proust, Kafka, Gide, Hesse, Faulkner, 
Malraux, Camus, Patrick White, and John Fowles. Does not count toward a French major. 
Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

309a/b. French Civilization (3-0-3) 

Development of French culture. The historical, social, and artistic achievements of the 
French from ca. 1000 to the Restoration. Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 202, or 
placement exam. Offered every other year. 

Ms. Alcover 

French 310a. French Civilization (3-0-3) 

The historical, social, and artistic achievements of the French from the Revolution to 
the present. Taught in French. Prerequisite: 202 or placement exam. 

Staff 

31 la. Introduction to French Literature I (3-0-3). 

Main currents in French literature from its beginning to the nineteenth century. 
Required for French majors. Lectures and discussions in French. Prerequisite: French 202 or 
placement exam. Offered fall 1988. 

Ms. Nelson 

312b. Introduction to French Literature II (3-0-3). 

Main currents in French literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Required 
for French majors. Lectures and discussions in French. Prerequisite: French 202 or place- 
ment exam. Offered spring 1989. 

Ms. Logan 

401a. Syntax and Translation (3-0-3). 

Close grammatical and stylistic analysis of passages for translation from English to 
French and to a lesser extent from French to English. This course is less theoretical than 
practical, with continual exercise in the art of translation and of writing good French. 
Prerequisite: French 301 and 302 or placement exam. Offered every other year. 

Staff 

403a. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Not offered every year. May be repeated for credit. 

Staff 

403b. Is Paris Burning? (3-0-3) 

History of Paris as city, capital, and cultural, intellectual, and economic center. Texts, 
slides, music, and films. Prerequisites: 301 or placement exam. Offered spring 1989. 

Ms. Alcover 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 297 

410a/b. Literature of the Middle Ages (3-0-3) 

Study ofthe major genres of medieval French literature including such works as La Vie 
de Saint Alexis, La Chanson de Roland, the lais of Marie de France, Le Chevalier dc la 
Charrete, and lyric poetry. Modern French translations will be used. Prerequisite: normally 
301 and 31 1 or placement exam. Not offered every year. 

Ms. Nelson 

420a/b. Literature ofthe Renaissance (3-0-3) 

This course includes readings from the principal poets and prose writers ofthe sixteenth 
century, with particular emphasis on the Pleiade poets, Rabelais, and Montaigne. Prerequi- 
site: normally 301 and 31 1 or placement exam. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Carrington. Ms. Logan 

430a/b. Seventeenth-Century Theater (3-0-3). 

This course examines the esthetics of classicism as represented in readings from 
Corneille, Moliere, Boileau, Racine, Sevigne, Lafayette, La Fontaine, with contemporary 
critical perspectives. Prerequisite: normally 301 and 31 1 or placement exam. Not offered 
every year. 

Ms. Farrell 

440a/b. Eighteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

This course includes such authors as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Marivaux, Diderot, Rous- 
seau, and Beaumarchais. Prerequisite: normally 301 and 31! or placement exam. Not 
offered every year. 

Ms. .41 cover 

451a/b. Nineteenth-Century Poetry (3-0-3) 

Studies in Romantic, Parnassian, and Symbolist poetry, dealing with such authors as 
Lamartine, Musset, Vigny, Hugo, Nerval, Leconte de Lisle, and Baudelaire. Prerequisite: 
normally 301 and 312 or placement exam. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

French 452a. Modern Drama (3-0-3) 

Nineteenth-and twentieth-century drama. Prerequisites: normally 301 and 312 or 
placement exam. Offered fall 1988. 

Ms. Konrad 

455a/b. Nineteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3) 

From Romanticism through Realism to Naturalism in such authors as Constant, 
Stendhal, Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola studied through modern critical perspectives. 
Prerequisites: normally 301 and 312 or placement exam. Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

461a/b. Studies in Modern Poetry (3-0-3) 

Studies in the poetics of the imaginary with special reference to Symbolist and post- 
Symbolist texts. The course deals with such authors as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarme, 
Valery, Apollinaire, the Surrealists, Michaux, Cesaire, Senghor, and Depestre. Prerequisites: 
normally 301 and 312 or placement exam. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Aresu 

462a/b. Twentieth-Century Drama (3-0-3) 

Representative plays by such authors as Giraudoux, Cocteau, Camus, Sartre, .Anouilh, 
lonesco, and Beckett. Prerequisite: normally 301 and 312 or placement exam. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 



298 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

463a/b. Introduction to Literary History and Theory: Text, Textuality and 

Modernity (3-0-3) 

An introductory to central problems of literary theory. The notions of text and textuali- 
ty will be analyzed in terms of their pertinence in Renaissance literature and contemporary 
thought. Readings will include works by Rabelais, Montaigne, Barthes Derrida and Ge- 
netic. Taught in French. Prerequisites: normally 30 1 , 3 11 , and 3 1 2 or placement exam Not 
oiiered every year. 

Ms. Logan 

464a/b. French Film (3-0-3) 

Open to both majors and non-majors. Offered in both French and English Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

465a/b. Twentieth-Century Fiction (3-0-3) 

Survey ofmajor novels in the twentieth-century. Prerequisite: normally 301 and 312 or 
placement exam. Not offered every year. 

Ms. Raaphurst 

466a/b. French Literature: From the 1950s to the Present (3-0-3) 

Studies in major literary works of the post-existentialist era in France and French- 
speaking cultures of Africa, Canada, and the Caribbean, with geographical emphasis varying 
from semester to semester. Prerquisite: normally 301 and 312 or placement exam Not 
oiiered every year. 

Mr. .iresu 

501a,502b. Graduate Research for the M.A. (0-0-3). 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

503a/b. Special Topics in French Literature (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year 

Staff 

504a/h. History and Stylistics of the French Language: (3-0-3). 

Topics changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year 

■ Staff 

510a/b. Seminar in Medieval Literature (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Topic for spring 1 989. Courtly 

Ms. Nelson 

521a/b. Seminar on Renaissance Poetry or Theatre (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Mr. Carrington 

525a/b. Seminar on Renaissance Prose (1470-1610) (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Offered fall 1988. 

Ms. Logan 

530a. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

The poetries and politics of race, gender, and class in the theater of Moliere Corneille 
and Racine. Offered fall 1988. 

Ms. Farrell 

543a/b. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century French Philosophers (3-0-3) 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year. 

Ms. .ilcover 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN 299 

545a/b. Seminar in the Eighteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3) 

Readings will include works by authors such as Montesquieu, Marivaux, Prevost, 
Voltaire, Rousseau, and Diderot. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

550a/b. Seminar in Romanticism (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

555a/b. Seminar in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3). 

From Romanticism through Realism to Naturalism in such authors as Constant, 
Stendhal, Hugo. Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

561a/b. Studies in French Poetry (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Topic for spring 1 989: Pamasse 

& Symbolism. ^ .. 

Staff 

562a/b. Seminar on Modern Drama (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Topic for spring 1 989: Modern 

drama & myth. ^ ,^ 

Ms. konraa 

563a/b. Seminar on the History and Theory of Criticism (3-0-3). 
Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. 

Staff 

565a/b. Seminar in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year. 

Ms. Raaphorst 

566a/b. Seminar in Contemporary Fiction (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year. 

Mr. .Aresii 

567a/b. Poetics ofthe Modern Lyric (3-0-3). 

Topic changes periodically. May be repeated for credit. 

^ Mr. Aresu 

800a,b. Thesis Research for the Ph.D. (0-0-9). 

Italian 

Italian Courses 

101a. Elementary Italian I (4-0-4). 

Concentration on all four language skills. Basic elements of Italian culture and civiliza- 
tion This course also includes a "BBC" video program. Language laboratory work required. 

Offered Fall 1988. .^ ^ zr i, 

Ms. Caflisch 



300 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

102b. Elementary Italian II (4-0-4). 

Concentration on all four language skills. Basic elements of Italian culture and civiliza- 
tion. This course includes a "BBC" video program. Language laboratory work required. 
Offered Spring 1 989. 

Ms. Caflisch 

201a. Intermediate Italian I (3-0-3). 

Intense oral and written grammar review. Introduction to the culture and civilization of 
Italy. Reading of modern prose; composition; class discussion on related materials. This 
course also includes a "BBC" video program and a movie by an Italian director. Offered Fall 
1988. 

Ms. Caflisch 

202b. Intermediate Italian II (3-0-3). 

Intense oral and written grammar review. Introduction to the culture and civilization of 
Italy. Reading of modern prose; composition; class discussion on related materials. This 
course also includes a "BBC" video program. Offered Spring 1989. 

Ms. Caflisch 



Geology and Geophysics 



Professor Ave Lallemant, Chair 

Professors Anderson, D.R. Baker, Bally, (on leave 1988-89), 

De Bremaecker, Heymann, Leeman (on leave 1988-89), Oldow, 

Stormer, Talwani, and Vail 

Adjunct Professors Buffler, Burke, D. M. Curtis, England, Savit, 

Seriff, Taner, and J. L. Wilson 

Associate Professors H.C. Clark, Dunbar (on leave 1988). Levander, 

and Sawyer 

Adjunct Associate Professors Dravis and Schwarzer 

Assistant Professor Droxler 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Riese and Sullivan 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program in Geology. The following courses are required for 
completion of the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in geology: 

Geology 101,102,311,312,331, 332, 334, 36 1 , 390, and 402. 

At least six semester hours of geology in additional courses at the 300-level or 
higher. 

The following supporting courses are also required: 

Mathematics 1 1 , 1 02, and 2 1 1 ; 

Chemistry 101, 102, and 107; 

Physics 101, 102, 132; 

Mathematical Sciences 223 (Min. 2 hours Fortran) or Computer Science 211. 

Double majors including geology must comply with the above requirements 
except that the two geology electives may be deleted. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 30 1 

Students in the geology major must satisfy the distribution requirements and 
complete no fewer than 60 semester hours in addition to the Departmental 
requirements for the Geology major for a total of 1 35 semester hours. 

The Department of Geology offers an approved curriculum leading to certifi- 
cation in earth science as a second teaching field. The curriculum consists of 25 
semester hours of introductory courses which would most benefit a secondary 
school teacher, i.e., physical and historical geology, study of minerals, rocks, and 
fossils; some work in astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography. 

Undergraduate Program in Geophysics. The following courses are required for 
completion of the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in geophysics: 

Geology 101, 102, 31 1, 331, 334, 361, 390, 441, 442, and 461; 

Mathematics 101, 102, 21 1, and 212; 

Chemistry 101, 102, and 107; 

Physics 101, 102, 132, 201, and 231; 

Mathematical Sciences 233 (Min. 2 hours Fortran) or Computer Science 211. 

Additional courses recommended but not required are Physics 301 and 
Mathematical Sciences 310 or Mathematics 355 and Mathematical Sciences 340. 

Students in the geophysics major must satisfy the distribution requirements 
and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours in addition to the Deparmental 
requirements for the Geophysics major for a total of 135 semester hours. 

Graduate Program. Graduate work is conducted in those specialties that are 
compatible with the interests of the staff. At present, the department is prepared to 
offer advanced work in stratigraphy, sedimentation, sedimentary petrology, 
marine geology-oceanography, carbonate petrology, igneous petrology, geochem- 
istry, structural geology, regional tectonics, rock mechanics, reflection seismology, 
and geodynamics. Graduate work is oriented toward the fundamental aspects of 
the subject rather than directly toward its many applied aspects. 

Requirements for Advanced Degrees: 

1 . Completion of a program of courses equivalent to that for the undergrad- 
uate major in geology or geophysics at Rice. This may be completed while 
in residence at Rice if it has not been done before entering. 

2. Completion at a high level of an approved program. All students must 
take Geology 403, which is the only required course. All students, regard- 
less of the degree with which they enter, must earn a total of 20 credit 
hours in courses other than research courses. During the second semester 
of the first year of residence, all students must register for the preparation 
of a thesis proposal. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a written qualifying exam. 

4. Passage of an oral exam structured around the thesis proposal. This will 
be taken before research has begun. 

5. Completion for publication of a thesis which represents an original 
contribution to science plus an oral defense of the research work and of 
the conclusions of the thesis. 

6. Regardless of the type of graduate appointment, satisfactory perform- 
ance in a limited amount of teaching assistance in undergraduate courses. 

7. Additional details are in the departmental guidelines which are distribut- 
ed to all incoming students. 



302 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Fellowships and/or tuition scholarships for incoming students are available 
which do not obligate work on a specific research project. During their first 
academic year they decide on a project and an advisor and are then supported by 
external fiinds. 

Most graduate students can expect to spend two years beyond the bachelor's 
degree in order to complete requirements for the master's degree and at least an 
additional two years for the doctoral degree. Students of very high ability may be 
allowed to bypass the M.A. and work directly for the Ph.D. 



Geology^ Courses 

101a. The Earth (3-3-4). 

Nature of the earth and the processes that change it. Laboratory includes the study of 
rocks, minerals, geological maps, air photos and a one weekend field trip. Also offered as 
Geography 101. 

Mr. Heymann, Mr. Talwani, Mr. Ave Lallemant, Mr. Droxler 

102b. Stratigraphy and Historical Geology (3-3-4). 

Fundamentals of physical and paleontologicai stratigraphy; sedimentation as it relates 
to stratigraphy, outcrop, well log and seismic stratigraphy, and a summary of historical 
geology. Laboratory exercises include a one wekend field trip. Also offered as Geography 
102. 

Mr. Vail 

311a. Mineralogy (3-6-5). 

Basic introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, systematics and classification, 
physical and chemical properties, distribution, occurrence and genesis of minerals, and 
optical mineralogy. 

Mr. Stormer 

312b. Petrology (3-3-4). 

Description and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Laboratory work 
emphasizes study of rock thin sections with petrographic microscope and includes a one 
weekend field trip. 

331a. Structural Geology (3-3-4). 

Introduction to deformation mechanics, structural analysis of faults and folds, and 
elementary tectonics. Laboratory emphasizes practical use of structural analysis and in- 
cludes a one weekend field trip. 

Mr. Oldow, Mr. Ave Lallemant 

332b. Sedimentology (3-3-4). 

Processes in sedimentation and sedimentary rocks including both clastic and carbonate 
rocks. Laboratory exercises include a one weekend field trip. 

Mr. Anderson. Mr. Droxler, Mr. Dunbar 

333a. Structural Geology (3-0-3). 

Same course as Geology 331 without the laboratory. For nonmajors only. 

Mr. Oldow. Mr. Ave Lallemant 

334b. Field Mapping Techniques (0-6-2). 

Beginning field techniques taught in seven labs and a week-long field project during 
Spring break. Geologic map and report to be submitted. 

Mr. Oldow, Mr. Ave Lallemant 



GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 303 

341a. The Oceans (3-0-3). 

Introduction to science of oceanography; survey of the geological, physical, and biologi- 
cal aspects; one Saturday field trip. Mainly for nonscience majors. 

Mr. A nderson, Mr. Dro.xler. Mr. Dunbar 

352b. Engineering Geology (3-0-3). 

Analysis, in terms of engineering and environmental applications, of earthquakes, 
faults, landslides, shorelines, ground water, subsidence, and other geologic phenomena. 
Techniques of engineering geology investigation. 

Mr. Clark 

361a. Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Description and analysis of gravity, magnetic, thermal, and seismic properties of the 
earth and their bearing on plate tectonics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, Mathematical 
Sciences 223 or equivalent. 

Mr. De Bremaecker 

390c. Field Geology (0- 1 2-4). 

A six-week field course in geology. 

402a. Paleontology (2-6-4). 

Introduction to the taxonomy, systematics, morphology, ecology, paleoecology and 
correlation of fossils. 

Mr. Anderson 

403a. Advanced Physical Geology (1-0-0). 

Introduction to current research in geology. Each faculty member in department 
participates by describing his research and some of the techniques involved. 

404a. Micropaleontology (2-6-4). 

Study of microfossils; emphasis on identification, ecology, paleoecology. and biostra- 
tigraphy of radiolaria and foraminiferia. Prerequisite: Geology 402 or permission of depart- 
ment. Not offered 1988-89. 

41 la. Metamorphic Petrology (3-3-4). 

Evaluation of sub-solidus mineral equilibria through consideration of natural assem- 
blages, thermodynamic calculations, and experiments. Labs stress thin section petrography. 
Not offered 1988-89. 

412b. Igneous Petrology (3-3-4). 

Evaluation of the evolution of igneous rocks in the earth's crust and mantle. Topics will 
include phase equilibria, experimental studies and geochemistry. Labs stress thin section 
petrography. 

Mr. Stormer 

415a. Economic Geology — Petroleum (3-0-3). 

A study of the geology of petroleum: origin, migration, and accumulation will be 
studied. Government regulation and industry economics will be examined. 

Mr. Riese. Mr. Bally 

416b. Economic Geology — Mineral Deposits (3-0-3). 

An overview of metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits, theories of their origin, and 
classification. The impact of government regulation, economics, production practices, and 
exploration will be considered. 

Mr. Riese 



304 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

418b. Geological Oceanography (3-3-4). 

Study of geological aspects of oceanography, including geomorphology, nearshore 
processes, seafloor spreading, plate tectonics, marine geophysics, marine sediments, and 
paleoceanography. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Anderson, Mr. Dunbar, Air. Droxler 

421a. Deep Sea Sediments/Paleoceanography (3-0-3). 

Study of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic evolution of the ocean system based on the 
analyses of biogenic and terrigenous deep sea sediments. Prerequisite: Geology 332. 

Mr. Droxler 

422b. Exploration Geophysics (3-0-3). 

Basic principles and procedures involved in geophysical exploration. Emphasis is on 
reflection seismology involving acquisition, processing, and interpretation of data. For 
nonmajors only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212. 

Mr. Seriff, Mr. Clark 

423b. Antarctic Marine Geology (3-0-3). 

The study of marine geologic principles and processes using examples from the South- 
ern Oceans. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Anderson 

427a. Sequence Stratigraphy (3-0-3). 

Fundamental principals of sequence stratigraphy (a new tool used to subdivide, corre- 
late, and map sedimentary rocks within chronostratigraphically constrained genetic inter- 
vals) and its application to outcrop, well log, and seismic data. 

Mr. Vail 

428b. Geologic Interpretation of Seismic Reflection Profiles (3-3-4). 

Discussion and application of seismic stratigraphic and structural interpretation proce- 
dures, including the integration of surface and subsurface data with seismic reflection 
profiles. 

Mr. Bally, Mr. Vail 

438b. Sedimentary Geochemistry and Mineralogy (3-0-3). 

Study of the chemistry of environments of formation of the major sedimentary minerals 
and rocks and secular variations through geologic history. 

Mr. Dunbar 

441a. Geophysical Data Analysis (2-2-3). 

Review complex variables, Fourier, Laplace, and Z-transforms; convolution, correla- 
tion, filtering, deconvolution, probability, sampling and aliasing, spectral estimation. Com- 
puter based exercises. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. Not offered 1988-89. 

442b. Exploration Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Basic principles and procedures involved in geophysical exploration. Emphasis is on 
reflection seismology, involving acquisition, processing, and interpretation of data. Includes 
computer exercises. Prerequisite: Geology 361. 

Mr. Seriff, Mr. Clark, Mr. Sawyer 

452b. Advanced Engineering Geology (3-0-3). 

Consideration of methods and research in engineering geology. Application of geophys- 
ical techniques to specific problems will be emphasized. Students will work as teams on 
several field projects. 

Mr. Clark 



GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 305 

453a. Chemistry of the Earth (3-0-3). 

An intermediate level, comprehensive geochemistry course with many problem solving 
exercises. Topics will include both high-pressure, high-temperature as well as low-tempera- 
ture aqueous geochemistry. 

Mr. Heytnann 

459a. Models in Geology (3-0-3). 

Discussion of models in general; numerical solutions of heat transfer, folding, and 
convection problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211,212, Mathematical Sciences 223, 340. 

Mr. De Bremaecker 

461a. Geophysics (3-3-4). 

Principles of elastic wave initiation, propagation, and reflection in ideal media and real 
rocks, with applications to exploration for hydrocarbons. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, 
Physics 101, 102. Mathematics 212 recommended, may be taken concurrently. 

Mr. Levander, Mr. Seriff 

462b. Geophysics: Geodynamics (3-0-3). 

The forces which govern the motions and deformations in the earth, and how they are 
constrained by geophysical and geological measurements. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211; 
Geology 361. 

Mr. De Bremaecker 

463a. Advanced Tectonics (3-3-4). 

Mechanics of rock deformation in theory, in experiments, and in nature. 

Mr. Ave Lallemant, Mr. Oldow 

464b. Fundamentals of Plate Tectonics (2-3-3). 

Introduction of plate tectonic theory concerning geometric constraints to plate mo- 
tions, driving mechanisms, behavior at plate boundaries, and intraplate tectonism. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Oldow, Mr. Bally 

465a. Comparative Phanerozoic Tectonics (3-3-4). 

A synthesis of the Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the earth. Global investigation of 
fold-thrust belts, their relationship to convergent plate boundaries, associated structural and 
stratigraphic relations, and the mechanics of deformation. Prerequisite: Geology 464. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Bally, Mr. Oldow 

481a. Senior Thesis Research in Geology (Variable). 

Advanced work adapted to the needs of the individual student. 

482b. Senior Thesis Research in Geology (Variable). 
See Geology 48 1 . 

491a. Special Studies (Variable). 

Study in specific fields under the guidance of a staff member. 

492b. Special Studies (Variable). 
See Geology 49 1 . 

501a. Special Studies (Variable). 

Advanced work in certain phases of geology adapted to the needs of individual graduate 
students. Prerequisite: permission of department. 

502b. Special Studies (Variable). 
See Geology 50 1 . 



306 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

503c. Special Studies (Variable). 
See Geology 501. 

504a. Clastic Sedimentary Environments, Processes, and Facies (3-0-3). 

Study of modem and ancient sedimentary environments with emphasis on field work. 
Depositional models examined in relation to climatic, oceanographic, and tectonic 
influences. 

Mr. Anderson 

505a. Applied Sedimentology ( 1 -6-3). 

Field investigation of sedimentary deposits of northwestern New Mexico to provide 
graduate students in sedimentology with training in field methods, interpretation of sedi- 
mentary deposits, and facies mapping. Prerequisite: Geology 504. 

Mr. Anderson 

506b. Carbonate Sedimentology (3-0-3). 

Characterization of modern and ancient, shallow and deep sedimentary environments 
and facies. Examination of different depositional models in relation to climate, as well as 
hydrographic and geographic settings. Three field trips. Prerequisite: Geology 332. 

Mr. Dro.xler 

511a.-530a. Seminars in Geology (3-0-3). 

Individual seminars cover different topics in different years and may be taken more 
than once. 

535a. Stable Isotope Geochemistry (3-0-3). 

Review of basic principles of isotope fractionation mechanisms and distribution of 
isotopes with focus on significance to major geological problems. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Baker, Mr. Dunbar 

536a. Organic Geochemistry (3-0-3). 

Principles and procedures of organic geochemistry applied to important geological 
problems, petroleum evolution, physical and chemical history of sediments. 

Mr. Baker 

537a. Advanced Sedimentary Geology (3-3-4). 

Lecture, lab, and field problems focusing on sedimentology and sedimentary petrogra- 
phy. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Baker 

539a. Advanced Petrology (3-3-4). 

Advanced topics in igneous and metamorphic petrology with emphasis on interests of 
the staff. Modern developments are rigorously examined in physiochemical terms. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Stormer 

540b. Advanced Petrology (3-3-4). 

Advanced topics in igneous and metamorphic petrology with emphasis on interests of 
the staff Modern developments are rigorously examined in physiochemical terms. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Stormer 

542b. Advanced Reflection Seismology (3-0-3). 

Review of elastodynamics. Calculation of synthetic seismograms for acoustic and 
elastic media using reflectivity, asymptotic and finite difference methods. Migration of 
reflection data by finite difference, FK and boundary integral methods. Prerequisite: Geolo- 
gy 441, 442, 461. 

Mr. Levander 



GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS 307 

550b. Advanced Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry(3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in crystal structure, chemistry, thermodynamics, and solution models. 
Detailed examination of important mineral groups such as feldspars, oxides, carbonates, 
phyllosilicates, etc. 

Air. Stormer 

561a. Advanced Topics in Geophysics: Inverse Problems (3-0-3). 

Content varies from year to year: convection, advanced wave propagation, tecto- 
nophysics, etc. 

Mr. De Bremaecker. Mr. Levander 

562b. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3-0-3). 

Content varies from year to year; convection, tectonophysics, etc. 

Mr. De Bremaecker 

566b. Experimental Structural Geology (3-3-4). 

Selected topics, such as elasticity and plasticity of minerals and rocks. Laboratory work 
includes experimental rock deformation. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Ave Lallemant 

568b. Structural Analysis of Deformed Rocks (3-3-4). 

Studies of structures, textures, and petrofabrics of deformed rocks, stress and strain 
analysis. 

Mr. Ave Lallemant 

572b. Introduction to Inductively Coupled Plasma Sprectroscopy (2-2-2). 

An applied workshop on the theory and application of ICP spectroscopy with emphasis 
on practical experience in quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: approval of instructor. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Leeman 

574b. Electron Microprobe/Scanning Electron Microscope: Theory (2-2-2). 

Fundamental principles, techniques, and applications of the Electron Microprobe/ 
SEM. Emphasis on quantitative analysis and geological problems. Practical laboratory 
instruction and experience in analytical techniques. 

Mr. Stormer 

579a. Preparation of M.A. Thesis Proposal (0-9-3). 

Students may not receive credit for both Geology 579 and 580. 

580b. Preparation of M.A. Thesis Proposal (0-9-3). 
See Geology 579. 

589a. Preparation of Ph.D. Thesis Proposal (0-9-3). 

Students may not receive credit for both Geology 589 and 590. 

590b. Preparation of Ph.D. Thesis Proposal (0-9-3). 
See Geology 589. 

595c. Summer Research (Credit variable, 1 to 6 hours). 

Research conducted during the summer in areas other than thesis work. 

800a,b,c Thesis Research (Variable). 



308 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Geography Courses 

101a. The Earth (3-3-4). 

See Geology 101. 

Mr. Heymann, Mr. Talwani. Mr. Ave Lallemant, Mr. Droxler 

102b. Stratigraphy and Historical Geology (3-3-4). 
See Geology 102. 

Mr. Vail 

German and Slavic Studies 



Professor E. M. Thompson, Chair 

Professors S. L. Clark, Copeland, Eifler, 

Weissenberger, J. B. Wilson, and Winkler 

Associate Professor R. G. Jones 

Lecturers Barry and A. N. Hill 



German 



Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Students majoring in German may pursue either of 
two options: German literature or German studies. 
For an option in German literature the requirements are: 

1 . Completion of a program approved by the Department. 

2. The equivalent of at least 24 semester hours (eight courses) numbered 300 
or higher. 

The Department recommends related courses in linguistics, history, philoso- 
phy, and other literatures. 
For an option in German studies the requirements are: 

1. Completion of a program which has been defined in close cooperation 
with the German departmental undergraduate adviser. 

2. The equivalent of at least 18 semester hours (six courses) in courses 
numbered 300 or higher. 

3. At least 1 2 semester hours (four courses) in courses relating to the field of 
German in other departments. Courses in translation offered by the 
Department pertaining to German culture and civilization count toward 
the fulfillment of the area requirement. 

This option in German studies, which permits maximum flexibility within a 
frame of clearly defined objectives, allows an interdisciplinary approach to Ger- 
man affairs. The student can incorporate into the study of German language and 
literature subject-related courses in political science, history, musicology, art 
history, philosophy, and economics. The option in German studies is designed for 
students who are preparing for a career in international law, business, banking, or 
diplomacy and for graduate study in a variety of fields such as history, political 
science, library science, art history, etc. 



GERMAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES 309 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Honors Program. The department offers a special program for outstanding 
students consisting of independent readings and research which must lead to a 
substantial honors essay under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 
Admission is decided in the second semester of a student's sophomore year. 

German Literature in Translation. Courses in German literature in translation 
("Germanics") are open to undergraduate students from all disciplines. Readings 
and discussions are in English. These courses may be repeated for credit. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the Depart- 
ment. Normally, this includes 24 semester hours at the graduate level. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign lan- 
guage other than German approved by the Department. 

3. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

4. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis and 
related topics. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the Depart- 
ment. Normally, this includes 45 semester hours at the graduate level, 
including those required for the degree of Master of Arts. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two foreign lan- 
guages other than German approved by the Department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination 
on the general field of German studies; this examination is based in part 
on a reading list provided by the Department. 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the Department; the disserta- 
tion is expected to represent an original contribution to knowledge. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields. 

Note: Requirements 1 and 2 must be met at least a year before the submission 
of a dissertation. 

As part of their training, graduate students, regardless of the type of appoint- 
ment, will be required to perform some duties, such as assisting in classes, the 
language laboratory, research, and other activities suggested by the department. 

Scholarships: Available for German language studies from the Dr. and Mrs. 
Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship Fund and the Max Freund Prize. 



German Courses 

101a. Elementary German (3- 1 -4). 

Introductory German with emphasis on speaking and reading. The course is supple- 
mented by language laboratory work. 

Ms. Clark and Staff 



3 1 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



102a. Elementary German (3- 1 -4). 
Continuation of Germ 101a. 



102b. Elementary German (3-1-4). 



105a. Beginning Germanic Language: Swedish (3- 1 -4). 
Introductory study with emphasis on speaking and reading. 



106b. Beginning Germanic Language: Swedish (3-1-4). 
Continuation of Germ 105. 



Staff 
Ms. Clark and Staff 

Mr. Wilson 

Mr. Wilson 



201a. Intermediate German I (3-0-3). 

Grammar, conversation, and extensive reading supplemented by films and language 
laboratory. 

Mr. Barry and Ms. Eifler 

201b. Intermediate German I (3-0-3). 
See Germ 201a. 

Mr. Barry 

202a. Intermediate German II (3-0-3). 

Mr. Barry 

202b. Intermediate German II (3-0-3). 

Intermediate language skills with readings and discussion of literary texts and related 
materials. Prerequisite: Germ 201. 

Mr. Barry and Mr. Winkler 

209a,b. Independent Work (Credit variable). Staff 

303a,b. Commercial German (3-0-3). 

Introduction to general business practices and terminology useful in a subsequent 
business career. Prerequisite: second-year competence or permission of instructor. Not 
offered this year. 

Ms. Eifler 

305a. Composition and Conversation I (3-0-3). 

A variety of reading materials serves as a basis for discussions and compositions. 
Prerequisite: second-year competence. 

Mr. Weissenherger 

306b. Composition and Conversation II (3-0-3) 
See German 305a. 

Ms. Eifler 

311a. Survey of German Literature I (3-0-3) 

An Introduction to the historical development of German literature: the description, 
interpretation, and analysis of literature and literary trends through the nineteenth century. 

Mr. Winkler 

312b. Survey of German Literature II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Germ 311. Not offered this year. Mr. Winkler 



GERMAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES 311 

341a,b. The Age of Goethe (3-0-3). 

German classical literature ( 1 700- 1 820); emphasis changes from year to year. May be 
repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

342a,b. Romanticism and Realism (3-0-3). 

Nineteenth-century literary tendencies related to social and political context. May be 
repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

371a. German Literature 1900-1945 (3-0-3). 

Concentrates on the literature of German Expressionism and the Weimar Republic. 
Not offered this year. 

Staff 

372b. German Literature Since 1945 (3-0-3). 

Authors who began their careers after 1945; for example, Boll, Grass, Durrenmatt, 
Weiss. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

375a,b. Germany Today: East and West (3-0-3). 

Comparative study of the two German states. Readings include documentary and 
literary texts. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Eifler 

378b. New German Cinema (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Eifler 

381a,b. Major Authors of German Literature (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

391a. Special Topics: Drama (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. 

Staff 

391b. Special Topics: The German Fairy Tale, Old and New. 

See Germ 391a 

Mr. Weissenberger 

392b. Special Topics: Film Adaptations of Great German Authors; 
Text and Film. 

Ms. Eifler 

401a,b,402a,b. Independent Work in German Literature (3-0-3). 

Qualified students work on projects of their choice under the supervision of individual 
instructors with approval of the undergraduate adviser. 

Staff 

405a. Introduction to Gothic and Old High German (3-0-3). 

Basic readings in language and literature. Open to graduate students for credit. 

Mr. Wilson 



3 1 2 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

411a,b. Introduction to Middle High German Language and Literature (3-0-3). 

Middle High German language and representative works from literature of the courtly 
period (twelfth and thirteenth centuries). Open to graduate students for credit. Not offered 
this year. 

Ms. Clark 

412a,b. Middle High German Lyric and Epic Poetry (3-0-3). 

Literature of the first high point of German literary development. Texts read in the 
original. Prerequisite: German 411. Open to graduate students for credit. Not offered this 
year. 

Ms. Clark 

421a,b. German Literature of the Renaissance and Reformation (3-0-3). 

Major aspects of German literature from 1400 to 1600. Open to graduate students for 
credit. Not offered this year. Ms. Clark 

422b. German Literature of the Baroque (3-0-3). 

German literature of the seventeenth century. Open to graduate students for credit. 

Ms. Clark 

431a,b. Advanced Stylistics (3-0-3). 

For advanced students to achieve oral and written proficiency in German, using tape 
recordings, films, and current newspaper articles. Prerequisite: Germ 305 or permission of 
instructor. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Weissenberger 

432a,b. German Applied Linguistics and Teaching Methodology (3-0-3). 

Contrastive study of German and English combined with problems m teaching meth- 
ods and the development and evaluation of teaching materials. Also offered as Linguistics 
432. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Copeland 



433a,b. Linguistic Structure of German (3-0-3). 
Also listed as Linguistics 433. Not offered this year. 



434a History of the German Language (3-0-3). 
Also listed as Linguistics 434. 



435b. Topics in Germanic Linguistics: 

Historical Germanic Syntax. Also listed as Linguistics 435. 



Mr. Copeland 



Mr. Copeland 



Mr. Copeland 



454a,b. A Linguistic Approach to Translation: German/English, English/ 
German (3-0-3). 
Not offered this year. Mr. Copeland 

500a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Staff 

51 la,b. Independent Graduate Work in German Literature (Credit variable). 
With approval of the graduate adviser. 

Staff 



GERMAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES 313 

512a,b. Independent Graduate Work in German Literature (Credit variable). 

With the approval of the graduate adviser. 

Staff 

521a,b. Gothic (3-0-3). 

The Gothic language, its significance in Germanic subfamily, readings from the Bible 
translation of Bishop Ulfila (fourth century). Not offered this year. 

Mr. Wilson 

522a,b. Old High German (3-0-3) 

Language and literature of the Old High German period (eighth to eleventh centuries); 
texts from the pagan and monastic traditions. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Wilson 

524b. Old Icelandic (3-0-3). 

The earliest Scandinavian language and literature; runic inscriptions, the prose sagas of 
the Viking era, the Eddie poetry of Germanic gods and heroes. 

Mr. Wilson 

526a,b. Seminar in Medieval Literature (3-0-3). 

Specific aspects and problems of medieval literature. The topics vary from year to year. 
May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Clark 

531a,b. Linguistic Structure of German (3-0-3). 

Synchronic study of Modern German syntax, phonology, and semantics, including 
discourse structure. Also offered as Linguistics 433. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Copeland 

532a,b. Special Topics in German Linguistics (3-0-3). 
Topics change from year to year. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Copeland 

561a,b. Seminar in Literary Criticism (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the major modes of literary historiography, interpretation, and evalua- 
tion since Dilthey. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Winkler 

562a,b. Seminar in Literary Theory (3-0-3). 

Historical studies of poetic theories and literary aesthetics. Not offered this year. 

Mr. Winkler 

563a,b. Seminar in Literary Genres (3-0-3). 

May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Eifler 

565a. Special Topics in German Literature (3-0-3). 
Topic: Literary Semiotics. May be repeated for credit. 

Mr. Winkler 

566b. Special Topics in German Literature (3-0-3). 

Mr. Winkler 

571a. Seminar in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (3-0-3). 
Topic: Aspects of Realism. 

Mr. Weissenberger 



3 1 4 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

571b. Seminar in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (3-0-3). 
Topic: Goethezeit 



572a. Seminar in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (3-0-3). 
Topic: The Austrian Novel. 



591a,b, 592a,b. Selected Problems in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 
May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



600a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 
700c. Graduate Summer Research (Credit variable). 
800a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 
Germanics Courses 



Mr. Barry 

Ms. Eifler 

Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 



313a, 314b. Studies in German Culture in Translation (3-0-3). 

Not offered this year. yV/5. Clark 



321a,b. Viking Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 
Not offered this year. 



Mr. Wilson 



351, 352a,b. Great German Authors of the Twentieth Century in Translation 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year 

Staff 

361, 362a,b. Special Topics in Modern German Literature in Translation 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year 

Staff 

376a,b. Germany Today: East and West (3-0-3). 

Comparative study of the two German states. Reading materials include documentary 
and literary texts. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Eifler 

391a, 392b. Special Topics in German Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year 

Staff 

406a,b. Major Trends in German Literature from the Middle Ages through 
Enlightenment in Translation (3-0-3). 
Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Clark 



GERMAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES 3 1 5 

407a,b. German Literature of the Middle Ages in Translation (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Clark 



Slavic Studies 



Degrees offered: B.A. 



Undergraduate Program. At least 24 semester hours (eight courses) offered in 
fulfillment of major requirements must be numbered 300 or higher. Double 
majors may be allowed to take 1 8 semester hours (six courses numbered 300 or 
higher) with the approval of the Department and should consult with the Slavic 
Studies staff to arrange a program compatible with the other major. Four of the 
courses may be language courses with the remainder literature or culture; these 
may be chosen by the student with the adviser's consent. All departmental majors 
must have their programs approved by the representative of the Department. 

No Russian is required for nonmajors who wish to take courses in Russian 
literature. Lectures and readings are in English. Majors are required to read some 
of the works and to write assigned papers in Russian. 

Scholarships: Available for Russian language studies from the Dr. and Mrs. 
Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship Fund. 



Slavic Courses 

105a, 106b. Beginning Slavic Language (3- 1 -4). 

Introductory study of one of the Slavic languages (Polish, Czech, Ukrainian, Serbo- 
Croatian) with emphasis on speaking and reading. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

320a,b. Slavic Civilization (3-0-3). 

Development of Slavic cuhures, with emphasis on the modern period. Not offered this 
year. 

Ms. Thompson 

450a,b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Qualified student may conduct research and write a paper on a topic of particular 

interest. 

Staff 

Russian Courses 

101a. Elementary Russian I (3-2-4). 

Fundamentals of Russian grammar. Pronunciation, reading, oral practice and 

translation. 

Mr. Jones 

102b. Elementary Russian II (3-2-4). 
See Russian 101. 

Staff 



3 1 6 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

201a. Intermediate Russian I (3-0-3). 

Grammar review, reading of selected texts, conversation and composition. 

Ms. Hill 

202b. Intermediate Russian II (3-0-3). 
See Russian 201. 

Staff 

301a. Conversation and Composition (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on composition and conversation with reading of relevant texts. 

Ms. Hill 

302b. Conversation and Composition (3-0-3). 
See Russ 301. 

Ms. Hill 

312b, Survey of Russian Literature (3-0-3). 

Comprehensive survey of Russian literature from Romanticism to the Soviet period. 
No knowledge of Russian required. 

Ms. Thompson 

351a. Tolstoy (3-0-3). 

Study of the major works of Tolstoy. No knowledge of Russian required. 

Ms. Thompson 

352b. Dostoevsky (3-0-3). 

Study of the major works of Dostoevsky. No knowledge of Russian required. Not 
offered this year. 

Ms. Thompson 

401a, 402b. Russian Stylistics I, II (3-0-3). 

Designed to improve the spoken and written language with emphasis on syntactic and 
idiomatic structures. 

Ms. Thompson 

41 la,b. Russian Literature of the Soviet Period (3-0-3). 

Survey of the literary works of Russian writers - Soviet and emigre - published since 
1917. No knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Thompson 

412a,b. Solzhenitsyn and the Dissidents (3-0-3). 

Study of the life and works of Solzhenitsyn and of the dissident movement in post-Stalin 
Russia. No knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Thompson 

420a,b. Women in Russian Literature (3-0-3). 

The portrayal of women in major works of Russian literature. No knowledge of Russian 
required. Not offered this year. 

Ms. Thompson 

442b. Special Topics in Russian Literature: Drama Practicum 

(3-0-3 each semester). 

May be repeated for credit. No knowledge of Russian required. 

Ms. Hill 



HISTORY 317 

History 



Professor Van Helden, Chair 

Professors Boles, Drew, Gruber, Haskell, Hyman, Loewenheim, 

Matusow, R.J. Smith, Stokes, and Wiener 

Associate Professors Seed and Wolin 

Visiting Associate Professor Odhiambo 

Assistant Professors Maas and Sanders 

Mellon Assistant Professor Kahan 

Lecturers Zammito and Zdatny 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. A student majoring in history must take a minimum 
of 30 semester hours (ten courses) in history, of which 1 8 semester hours (six 
courses) must be on the advanced level (300 or 400). Two of the student's advanced 
courses must be chosen from a departmental list of seminars/colloquia devoted 
mainly to writing and discussion. In addition, students are expected to distribute 
their ten courses over four fields: 

I. Ancient-Medieval: one course minimum 

II. Modern Europe: two courses minimum 

III. United States: two courses minimum 

IV. Asia, Latin America, Africa: one course minimum 

History majors also are advised to acquaint themselves with humanistic 
disciplines other than history (for example, literature, fine arts, and philosophy) 
and also with social sciences such as political science, sociology, economics, and 
anthropology, whose contributions to historical studies are vital. Some foreign 
language proficiency is desirable for a history major, and the department highly 
recommends that students contemplating graduate work in history study at least 
one foreign language in some depth (most graduate schools require a reading 
knowledge of French and German for the Ph.D. degree). 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

GraduateProgram. Graduate students in history are accepted for study lead- 
ing to either the M.A. or Ph.D. Holders of the B.A. degree (or its equivalent) from 
an acceptable institution are eligible to apply. The graduate program is designed to 
train a limited number of carefully selected Students. Both the M.A. and the Ph.D. 
degrees are offered in limited areas of American, European and other history. 
Further information about the fields may be obtained on request from the 
department. 

Graduate fellowships as well as graduate scholarships within the limits of 
available funds are awarded to qualified students with demonstrated ability. 
Fellowships include a stipend and a waiver of tuition; scholarships provide a 
waiver of tuition only. As a part of their training, all graduate students are expected 
to render limited services to the department as tutorial instructors, as research 



3 1 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

assistants, or as assistants to the editors of the Journal of Southern History or The 
Papers of Jefferson Davis, both of which are sponsored by Rice University. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. Candidates for the M. A. degree 
are expected to complete a certain amount of formal class or seminar work, usually 
24 semester hours; take one graduate colloquium and one graduate seminar; and 
write a thesis under the direction of an advisory committee of the department 
headed by a professor having special competence in the subject area of the thesis. 
An oral defense of the thesis is also required. Completion of these requirements 
usually takes two years. Not more than three years may elapse between the time the 
student is admitted to graduate study and the completion of the degree, unless an 
extension is approved by the departmental graduate committee. An alternate M. A. 
degree is available to doctoral students who fulfill the special requirements set by 
the department. 

Requirements for the Degree ofDoctorofPhilosophy. Candidates for the Ph.D. 
degree are expected to prepare themselves for a qualifying examination in three 
fields, at least two of which must be in the major area of concentration (European, 
American, or other history). The two fields in the major area of concentration 
should include one broadly defined field and one more narrow concentration 
within that broad area (e.g., U.S. history and slavery; modern European history 
and the Hitler era; Latin American history and capitalism in the modem world). If 
the major area is European history, the third field must be in American history; if 
the major area is in American history, the third field must be in European history. 
If the major area is outside American or European history, the third field must be 
in either American or European history. Preparation for this qualifying examina- 
tion (the passing of which qualifies the student to apply for formal admission to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. degree) normally includes course work, directed reading, 
and a substantial amount of independent reading. This work must also include at 
least two graduate colloquia and two graduate seminars. The department has no 
specific requirements for the number of hours that must be completed, but Ph.D. 
students are expected to remain full-time students from their entry into the 
program until they pass their qualifying examination. The qualifying examination 
usually is oral, though it may be written or both written and oral at the discretion of 
the department. It is given only after the student has completed all necessary 
course and seminar work and passed reading examinations in the principle lan- 
guage of research (unless it is English) and one other language (not English). 
Students should take the qualifying examination before the beginning of their sixth 
semester and must take it before the beginning of the seventh semester. In addition 
to the foreign language examinations and the qualifying examination, the Ph.D. 
candidate must present a dissertation embodying the results of original research 
and defend it in a public oral examination. This dissertation must be completed 
within three calendar years after passing the qualifying examination, unless an 
extension is granted by the departmental graduate committee. 



HISTORY 319 

History 



History Courses 



101a. European History to 1848 (3-0-3). 

Why has the world been so thoroughly reshaped by the European experience? A 
comprehensive attempt to answer that question. Recommended for freshmen and sopho- 
mores. Offered with additional work as History 301. 

Mr. Stokes 

102b. European History, 1848-1985 (3-0-3). 

Continuation of History 101. Recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Offered 
with additional work as History 302. 

Mr. Stokes 

105a. Varieties of the American Experience I (3-0-3). 

Interpretive approaches to American history. Not offered 1988-89. 

Staff 

106b. Varieties of the American Experience II (3-0-3). 

Interpretive approaches to American history. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Staff 

152b. Freshman Seminar in Ancient History (3-0-3). 

The Hero and his Companion from Gilgamesh to Sam Spade. How does presentation of 
heroic action illustrate the basic values of a society? Through consideration as historical 
sources of several ancient texts, modern mystery stories, and two "western" movies, we will 
see the development of a style of community service that links heroism with alienation. The 
extent to which women participate will be traced. Interested students must see Professor 
Maas by the end of the fall semester. Enrollment is limited. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

201a. Introduction to Ancient History (3-0-3). 

Why are the ancient civilizations of the Near East, Greece, and Rome important and 
how do we go about studying them? This course surveys major contributions of the ancient 
world to western civilization and examines the premises of modern interpretations. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

202b. Medieval History (3-0-3). 

A history of the late Roman Empire and the Middle Ages. 

Ms. Drew 

211a. American Thought and Society I (3-0-3). 

A topical introductory survey of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American histo- 
ry, primarily concerned with intellectual and social developments underlying the surface of 
events. Offered with additional work as History 311. 

Mr. Haskell 

212b. American Thought and Society II (3-0-3). 

A topical introductory survey of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American history, 
primarily concerned with intellectual and social developments underlying the surface of 
events. Offered with additional work as History 3 1 2. 

Mr. Haskell 



320 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

213a. Slavery in North America (3-0-3). 

An interdisciplinary examination of all aspects of United States slavery, from the 
African background through emancipation. Offered with additional work as History 413. 
Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Boles 

214b. History of Religion in America (3-0-3). 

A survey from Pilgrim beginnings to modern revivalism. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Boles 

223a. History of Science (3-0-3). 

A broad survey of the development of scientific ideas and methods from the ancient 
Greeks to the end of the seventeenth century. No expertise in science required. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

224b. History of Modern Science (3-0-3). " 

A broad survey of the development of scientific ideas and methods since about 1 700. No 
expertise in science required. 

Mr. Van Helden 

242b. Southern Autobiography (3-0-3). 

The autobiography as a genre of historical documentation for U.S. southern history. 
The autobiographies discussed will cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and re- 
present most segments of the population. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Boles 

250b. Chinese Culture (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the language, philosophy, religion, literature, arts, and social cus- 
toms of China. Offered with additional work as History 450. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Smith 

257a. Technology and World History (3-0-3). 

An examination of the technological dimension of human culture from the Paleolithic 
era to the eve of the Industrial Revolution, ca. 1 750; a comparative approach. Offered with 
additional work as History 357. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

258b. Technology and the Contemporary World (3-0-3). 

An examination of how the Western world has been changed by technology and science 
since 1 750, and how other societies have incorporated Western technology, or parts of it, into 
their cultures. Offered with additional work as History 358. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

261a. History of England: From the Reformation to 1815 (3-0-3). 

The personalities and forces that changed England from a backwater of Europe into the 
leading nation in the world. Lectures, discussions, and frequent short papers. Offered with 
additional work as History 36 1 . 

Mr. Chadwick 

262b. History of England: 1815 to the Present (3-0-3). 

England's "take-off into the Industrial Revolution and how it has adapted to it. The 
twentieth century decline. Novels, biographies, and other materials are used to examine the 
transformation of British society in the past two centuries. Lectures, discussions, and 
frequent short papers. Offered with additional work as History 362. 

Mr. Wiener 



HISTORY 321 

265b. Contemporary History (3-0-3). 

Our own years in historical perspective. The world since Nixon and Kissinger. Reading 
includes latest memoirs and biographies, leading newspapers and periodicals, also television 
and radio news. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

269b. U.S.-Latin American Relations (3-0-3). 

This course is a basic history of U.S.-Latin American Relations from 1775 to the 
present. Particular attention is given to twentieth-century policies and problems focusing on 
intervention since 1 945. Offered with additional work as History 469. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Ms. Seed 

271a. History of France to 1815 (3-0-3). 

The first part of a two-semester survey of French history focusing on the structures of 
French society and the crash of the Old Regime. Offered with additional work as History 371. 

Mr. Zdatny 

272b. History of France since 1815 (3-0-3). 

Revolutions, industrialization, civil wars, culture, cuisine, the fall from Great Power 
status — and why the French are still sensitive about it. Offered with additional work as 
History 372. 

Mr. Zdatny 

281a. History of the Islamic Near East, 600-1055 (3-0-3). 

A survey of the basic political, institutional, and social history of the Near East from the 
rise of Islam to the Seljuks. We will pay particular attention to the elaboration of political and 
religious institutions (especially the caliphate), the origins and rise of Shii Islam, the caliphal 
empires, and the advent of the Turkic peoples. 

Ms. Sanders 

282b. History of the Islamic Near East, 1055-1517 (3-0-3). 

Continues the first semester survey from the advent of the Seljuk Turks to the Ottoman 
conquest of Egypt. It includes discussion of the fate of the caliphate after the political 
fragmentation of the Abbasid empire, the rise of the Mamluk military system, Mongols, 
Crusades, and the early history of the Ottoman and Safavid empires. 

Ms. Sanders 

293a. The Art of War from Alexander to Napoleon (3-0-3). 

A study of the theory and practice of warfare from the classical age to the early 
nineteenth century. Reading includes selections from Thucydides, Caesar, Machiavelli, 
Saxe, and Napoleon. Also offered with additional work as History 393. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Gruber 

294b. War in the Modern World (3-0-3). 

The theory, practice, and experience of war in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Reading includes selections from Clausewitz and Liddell Hart. Offered with additional work 
as History 394. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Gruber 

297a. Constutional and Legal History ofthe U.S. 1(3-0-3). 

Major questions in the historical development of American law and governing institu- 
tions. Offered with additional work as History 397. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Hyman 

298b. Constitutional and Legal History ofthe U.S. 11(3-0-3). 

Major questions in the historical development of American law and governing institu- 
tions. Offered with additional work as History 398. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Hvman 



322 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

299a. Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3). 

Background of the war, the course of the war itself, and the economic and social 
consequences of the war. 

Mr. Hyman 

301a. European History to 1848 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 101. Students may not receive credit for both History 

101 and 301. Recommended for juniors and seniors. 

Mr. Stokes 

302b. European History, 1848-1985 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 102. Students may not receive credit for both History 

102 and 302. Recommended for juniors and seniors. 

Mr. Stokes 

303a. Undergraduate Independent Reading (3-0-3). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to a limited 
number of advanced students with special permission. 

304b. Undergraduate Independent Reading (3-0-3). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to a limited 
number of advanced students with special permission. 

305a. Russian History (3-0-3). 

A survey of Russian history from earliest times to the present. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Stokes 

306b. Politics and Society in Ancient Greece (3-0-3). 

Discussion of the main developments in social, political, and intellectual life in the 
Greek world from the end of the Mycenaean Age to the advent of Alexander the Great. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

307a. Imperial Rome from Caesar to Diocletian (3-0-3). 

How did Rome acquire, maintain, and understand her empire? This course considers 
the development of a political, social, and ideological system fitted to an empire reaching 
from Scotland to Mesopotamia during the three centuries of Rome's greatest power. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

308b. The World of Late Antiquity (3-0-3). 

A social, religious, and political history of the Roman world from Diocletian to the rise 
of Islam. Focus will be on the breaking of the unity of the Mediterranean world and the 
formation of Byzantine society in the Greek east. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

309a. Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (3-0-3). 

What was the "fall" of the Roman Empire? This course examines the circumstances of 
the end of Roman political authority in western Europe. Ancient and modern theories will be 
considered, with special emphasis on the importance of the Germanic invasions. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

31 la. American Thought and Society I (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 211. Students may not receive credit for both 21 1 and 
311. 

Mr. Haskell 



HISTORY 323 

312b. American Thought and Society II (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 212. Students may not receive credit for both History 
212and312. 

Mr. Haskell 

327a. Colonial Latin American History I (3-0-3). 

The first part of a two-semester survey course of colonial Latin America focusing on 
construction of the self and "other" narrative strategies and rhetoric. The colonial part 
examines narratives of conquest, travel, and piracy in Latin America and the Caribbean in 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Seed 

328b. Modern Latin American History II (3-0-3). 

This is the second part of a two semester-course on Latin America focusing on construc- 
tion of the self and "other" narrative strategies, and rhetoric in contemporary Latin America. 
The modem half examines nineteenth- and twentieth-century essays and novels dealing with 
modem Latin American identity. Readings include Sarmiento, Paz, and Naipaul. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Seed 

337a. History of Ancient and Medieval Law (3-0-3). 

Ancient law focusing on imperial Roman law and the various forms of medieval law: 
vulgar Roman law, barbarian Germanic law, and English common law. 

Ms. Drew 

339b. Morality and History (3-0-3). 

Does it subvert the very idea of morality to say that it has a history, that it is susceptible 
to change? Students in this discussion and writing course will grapple with this problem 
through selected readings drawn mainly from Anglo-American history and philosophy that 
range over a period of several centuries. 

Mr. Haskell 

340a. Victorian Intellectuals (3-0-3). 

The upheaval in late nineteenth-century social thought and culture associated with 
Darwin's theory of evolution. Readings (mainly American, but including English and 
continental writers for comparison) may include Spencer, Veblen, Henry Adams, William 
James, Dewey, Matthew Arnold, and Nietzsche. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Haskell 

341a. History ofChina I (3-0-3). 

Survey of Chinese history from antiquity to about 1 800, highlighting salient aspects of 
China's heritage. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Smith 

342b. History of China II (3-0-3). 

China's revolutionary transformation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries — 
from Ch'ing dynasty to People's Republic. Not offered 1988-89. 

343a. Contemporary China (3-0-3). 

An examination of the interplay between "tradition" and "modernity" in contempora- 
ry China. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Smith 

349a. Age of Bismarck (3-0-3). 

The history of Europe from the French Revolution and Napoleon to Bismarck, Glad- 
stone, and the Spanish-American War. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Loewenheim 



324 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

350a. America in the Twentieth Century (3-0-3). 

Survey of major economic, social, and political developments in the United States from 
1900 to 1940. Lectures, readings, discussions and one research paper. By permission of the 
instructor; limited to 40 students. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Matusow 

357a. Technology and World History (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 257. Students may not receive credit for both 257 and 

357. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

358b. Technology and the Contemporary World (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 258. Students may not receive credit for both 258 and 

358. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

359a. Roman Britain and Medieval England (3-0-3). 

Survey of historical developments in Roman Britain and Medieval England with 
special attention to social, economic, and religious factors. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Drew 

361a. History of England: From the Reformation to 1815 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 261. Students may not receive credit for both 261 and 
361. 

Mr. Chadwick 

362b. History of England: 1815 to the Present (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 262. Students may not receive credit for both 262 and 
362. 

Mr. Wiener 

370a. American Medicine from Colonial Times to Present (3-0-3). 

Provides a chronological survey of the evolution of American medical practice, organi- 
zation, and social context from colonial times to the present. In addition, there will be a focus 
on a variety of specific issues including: women and medicine; medical sects; malpractice; 
technology old and new; psychiatry; ethics; the doctor/patient relationship; and corporate 
medicine. Lectures, discussion, and short essays. 

Mr. De Ville 

371a. History of France to 1815 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 27 1 . Students may not receive credit for both 27 1 and 
371. 

Mr. Zdatny 

372b. History ofFrance since 1815 (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 272. Students may not receive credit for both 272 and 
372. 

Mr. Zdatny 

376b. Existentialism (3-0-3). 

An examination of the genesis and development of existentialism as an intellectual 
force in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe. Will begin with a brief treatment of 
Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, before proceeding to a study of twentieth-century figures such as 
Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wolin 



HISTORY 325 

379a. Contemporary Debates in European Intellectual History (3-0-3). 

An examination of the so-called "postmodernism" controversy: has the West in the 
aftermath of World War II entered into a state of crisis that has rendered the values of 
modernity — individualism. Enlightenment rationalism, humanism, autonomous art — 
obsolete? Will pursue these questions by investigating the work of some of the leading 
thinkers of the contemporary era: Foucault, Habermas, Horkheimer and Adorno, Bell Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wolin 

383a. The Enlightenment (3-0-3). 

A study of the transformation of the European intellect during the eighteenth century, 
with special emphasis on the Enlightenment as the intellectual harbinger of the French 
Revolution. Among the authors: Locke, Hume, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Kant. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wolin 

391a. Capitalism and Culture (3-0-3). 

What are the cultural consequences (ethical, aesthetic, and religious) of capitalism as a 
social formation? This question will be addressed through an examination of the work of 
several major social theorists, classical and contemporary. Among the authors treated will be 
Marx, Weber, Parsons, Habermas, and Bell. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wolin 

393a. The Art of War from Alexander to Napoleon (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 293. Students may not receive credit for both 293 and 

393. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Gruber 

394b. War in the Modern World (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 294. Students may not receive credit for both 294 and 

394. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Gruber 

395a. The Old South (3-0-3). 

Economic, cultural, political, and social history of the South from 1607 to 1860. 

Mr. Inscoe 

396b. The New South (3-0-3). 

Continuation of History 395 to the present. 

Mr. Inscoe 

397a. Constitutional and Legal History of the U.S. I (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 297. Students may not receive credit for both 297 and 

397. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Hyman 

398b. Constitutional and Legal History of the U.S. II (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 298. Students may not receive credit for both 298 and 

398. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Hyman 

399a. Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 299. Students may not receive credit foi both 299 and 
399. 

Mr. Hyman 

403a. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 

Open to well-qualified students with special permission. Students must take both 
History 403 and 404 to gain credit. 



326 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

404b. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 
See History 403. 

405a. Fascism (3-0-3). 

A look at the most murderous political philosophy of our time, at the leaders (Mussolini, 
Hitler), the followers, and the victims. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Zdatny 

406b. The French Revolution (3-0-3). 

An in-depth examination of "the first modem revolution": regicide, terror, counterrev- 
olution — "the rule of the people," the marriage of ideals, and the guillotine. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Zdatny 

407a. Holocaust (3-0-3). 

It isn't easy to murder millions of people. It takes dedication and, above all, organiza- 
tion. This course will examine the idea and the execution of Hilter's plans to wipe Jews from 
the face of the earth. (Seminar, limited to 1 7 students.) 

Mr. Zdatny 

408b. From Cromwell to Lenin: Revolutions in Modern Europe (3-0-3). 

July 1989 is the 200th anniversay of the Bastille, and the bicentennial of the French 
Revolution. It presents an apt occasion to wonder about revolutions and revolutionaries in 
European History. How does the political status quo erupt into revolution? What kind of 
people lead these political super-novas? Do they lead inevitably to anarchy and violence or 
do they serve freedom and the progress of mankind? 

Mr. Zdatny 

413b. Slavery in North America (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 2 1 3. Students may not receive credit for both 2 1 3 and 
413. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Boles 

423a. Women in Early Modern Europe (3-0-3). 

This course develops a critical feminist perspective on the historical issues of the early 
modem era. Topics covered include: the coming of capitalism, the Reformation, the expan- 
sion of literacy, the demographic transition, and the development of seventeenth-century 
science. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Ms. Seed 

430b. Values and Social Policy, Past and Present (3-0-3). 

Changing understandings of the problems of "crime" and "poverty," and what to do 
about them, nineteenth century to the present, in Britain and the United States. An attempt 
to bring historical perspective to bear upon current issues, and to place social policy in 
cultural and ideological context. Lectures, discussions and a research paper. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Wiener 

431a. Victorian Morality (3-0-3). 

The rise and decline of a set of attitudes and values about human nature and behavior 
that flourished widely in the nineteenth century. Social sources and functions of this morality 
will be stressed, in particular its role in structuring class, gender, and generational relations in 
an age of rapid change. Britain will be the geographical focus, with glances at the United 
States and Western Europe. Material examined will include literature and art. Lectures, 
discussions, and a research paper. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Wiener 



HISTORY 327 

437a. Life on the Nile: Egyptian Politics, Culture, and Society from Medieval to 

Modern Times (3-0-3). 

An examination of Egyptian history from the Arab conquest in 641 until the 20th 
century, focusing on major themes in Egypt's political, social, and cultural life, on historical 
continuities and discontinuities, and on problems of historical interpretation. 

Ms. Sanders 

438b, Gender and Society in Islam (3-0-3). 

This course will examine some features of the legal position and social realities of men 
and women in the Islamic world. We will discuss the family and sexual ethics, the harem, 
polygyny, divorce, and eunuchs (who played an important role in both the military and in 
certain religious institutions) in order to understand how the boundaries of gender have 
traditionally been drawn. 

Ms. Sanders 

440a. Social and Economic History of Europe in the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 

Seminar covering selected problems in the social and economic history of medieval 
Europe. 

Ms. Drew 

442b. History of Astronomy and Cosmology (3-0-3). 

A lecture and discussion course dealing with topics in the history of astronomy and 
cosmology from antiquity to the twentieth century. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Van Helden 

450b. Chinese Culture (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 250. Students may not receive credit for both 250 and 
450. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Smith 

454b. Reporting from the Unfree World (3-0-3). 

How Western journalists have viewed authoritarian and totalitarian regimes in the 
twentieth century, from the Russian Revolutions of 1 9 1 7 to the present, the background and 
impact of their accounts on public opinion and offical policy. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

455a. From Bismarck to the First World War (3-0-3). 

The revolutions of 1848, the unification of Italy and Germany, Bismarck and Glad- 
stone, the new nationalism and imperialism, the political and cultural upheavals of the turn 
of the century, and the road to war. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

456a. Decline of the Western World 1914-39 (3-0-3). 

Europe from 1914 to 1939: the First World War and its consequences, with special 
attention to the historic role of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

457a. From Danzig to Suez: the End of the European World, 1939-1956 (3-0-3). 

Europe from 1939 to 1956: the Second World War and its consequences, with special 
attention to the role of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

458b. Europe and World Politics from Suez to the Present (3-0-3). 

The world in 1 956, the Cold War, the era of Vietnam, and after, with special attention to 
role of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Loewenheim 



328 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

459a. The Munich Crisis (3-0-3). 

The historical origins, inner history, and significance of a world historical crisis, with 
special emphasis on contemporary records and the role of the United States. (In observance 
of the 50th anniversary of the Munich Conference, September 29-30, 1938.) 

Afr. Loewenheim 

460b. Advanced Seminar in Ancient History (3-0-3). 

Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: History 307, 308, or 309, or consent of the instruc- 
tor. Topic for spring 1987: "Constantine and the Conversion of the Roman Empire to 
Christianity." Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Maas 

462b. The Life and Times of Adolph Hitler (3-0-3). 

How and why Hitler and National Socialism took over Germany, conquered most of 
Europe, and finally met defeat and destruction. (In observance of the centennial of Hitler's 
birth, April 20, 1889.) 

Mr. Loewenheim 

465a. Colonial America to 1754 (3-0-3). 

The growth of society, thought, and politics in the English colonies of North America. 
Lectures, discussions, and papers. 

Mr. Gruber 

466b. American Revolution, 1754-1789 (3-0-3). 

The origins and implications of the American Revolution, emphasizing constitutional, 
social, and political developments. 

Mr. Gruber 

469b. U.S.-Latin American Relations (3-0-3). 

An enriched version of History 269. Students may not receive credit for both 269 and 
History 469. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Seed 

492b. Michel Foucault (3-0-3). 

The late French theorist Foucault is commonly regarded as one of the greatest thinkers 
of the post-war era. After an introductory account of some of the major influences on his 
thought (Heidegger, Nietzsche, French Structuralism), the course will proceed to a detailed 
scrutiny of his major works and their social context. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Wolin 

494b. Problems in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century European History 

(3-0-3). 

A discussion and pro-seminar on various problems of nineteenth- and twentieth- 
century European history. Different topics are covered in different years. For spring 1 989 the 
topic will be "Change in Eastern Europe: is it possible?" 

Mr. Stokes 

501a. Master's Historical Research (Variable). 

Master's thesis. Students must take both History 501 and 502 in order to gain credit. 

502b. Master's Historical Research (Variable). 
See History 501. 

503a. Graduate Topics (Variable). 

504b. Graduate Topics (Variable). 



HISTORY 329 



511a. Directed Readings in American History I (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

512b. Directed Readings in American History I (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

513a. Directed Readings in American History II (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

514b. Directed Readings in American History II (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



517a. Directed Readings in Science and Technology (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



Mr. Van Helden 



518b. Directed Readings in Science and Technology (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



Mr. I 'an Helden 



521a. Directed Readings in Medieval History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



Ms. Drew 



522b. Directed Readings in Medieval History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



Ms. Drew 



527a. Directed Readings in Non-Western History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

528b. Directed Readings in Non-Western History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

529a. Directed Readings in Modern European History I (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

530b. Directed Readings in Modern European History I (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

531a. Directed in Readings in Modern European History II (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 

532b. Directed Readings in Modern European History II (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



533a. Graduate Colloquium in European History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. Not offered 1988-89. 



Mr. Stokes 



535a. Graduate Colloquium in American History (4-0-4). 
For graduate students only. 



Mr. Gruber, Mr. Matusow 



581b. Graduate Seminar in Medieval History (4-0-4). 
Offered when demand justifies. Not offered 1988-89. 



Ms. Drew 



330 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

582b. Graduate Seminar in Modern British History (4-0-4). 
The topic in 1989 will be law and Victorian society/culture. 



583a. Seminar in Southern History (4-0-4). 
Not offered 1988-89. 



Mr. Wiener 



Mr. Boles 



585a. U.S. Constitutional and Legal History (4-0-4). 

Significant constitutional and legal questions stressing civil liberties, criminal law, 
civil-military relations, race relations, and urban problems. 

Mr. Hyman 

586b. U.S. Constitutional and Legal History (4-0-4). 

Significant constitutional and legal questions stressing civil liberties, criminal law, 
civil-military relations, race relations, and urban problems. 

Mr. Hvman 



591a,b. Graduate Reading (1-0-1). 

Graduate reading in conjunction with another course. 



592b,a. Graduate Reading (1-0-1 ). 
See History 59 1 . 



593a,b. Graduate Reading (1-0-1 ). 
See History 591. 



800a,b. Ph.D. Research (Variable). 
Doctoral dissertation. 



Mr. Van Helden 



Mr. Van Helden 



Mr. Van Helden 



Mr. Van Helden 



Human Performance and Health Sciences 



Professor Poindexter, Chair 

Professors Bearden and Spence 

Adjunct Professors Bryan, Butler, Fred, Skaggs, and Weinberg 

Associate Professors Bland, Disch, lammarino, and E.J. Lee 

Visiting Associate Professor Fitch 

Assistant Professors K.A. Davis, Etnyre, A. Shetty 

Instructors Lindley, L. Phenix 
Lecturers Bordelon, Eggert, Peters, and Pyung-Soo 

Degrees Offered: B.A. with major in Human Performance; health education as 
teaching field only. 



HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH SCIENCES 33 1 

A minimum of 1 20 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Arts with a 
major in Human Performance. The University distribution requirements de- 
scribed on pages 62-82 must be satisfied. Students majoring in Human Perform- 
ance must complete 38 semester hours of physical education courses and laborato- 
ries in accordance with one of the specified Human Performance tracks. Human 
Performance 105 and 120 and six activity laboratories are required in all tracks. 
For additional information about the tracks, consult with a departmental faculty 
adviser. 

Both physical education and health education are offered as fields for teacher 
certification. Students wishing to qualify for teacher certification by the Texas 
Education Agency must complete 12 semester hours of English, 6 semester hours 
of American history, 6 semester hours of federal and state government, 1 8 semes- 
ter hours of education, 24 semester hours in another teaching field, and 24 
semester hours of health education courses or physical education courses, accord- 
ing to which is selected for the teaching field. Requirements are subject to change 
based on Texas Education Agency regulations. 

Health education courses cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for a 
major in physical education but may be taken as electives by all students. 



Human Performance Courses 

101a,b. Basic Physical Education (0-2-0). 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and 
participation in two physical activities. Required for baccalaureate degree. Normally, it is 
expected that the requirement be completed during the freshman year. 

Mr. Bland 

102a,b. Basic Physical Education (0-2-0). 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and 
participation in two physical activities. Required for baccalaureate degree. Normally, it is 
expected that the requirement be completed during the freshman year. 

Mr. Bland 

105a. Contemporary Sport (3-0-3). 

Interactions of history, philosophy, economics, politics, education, and contemporary 
social issues in the evolution of sport. For first- and second-year students. 

Ms. Poindexter 

120b. Scientific Foundations (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the scientific areas of human movement: anatomy and physiology, 
physiology of exercise, motor learning, and kinesiology. 

Mr. Shetty 

122a. Basic Aquatics (0-3- 1 ). 

Instruction in basic aquatic activities, including mechanics of the various strokes and 
basic lifesaving. 

Mr. Bearden 

124b. Conditioning (0-3-1). 

Concepts and experience in health-related fitness and conditioning for improved 
performance. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Human Performance 120 
or previous enrollment in 101 and 102. 

Mr. Shettv 



332 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

1 25a,b, Advanced Lifesaving (0-3- 1 ). 

Aquatic instruction leading to Advanced Lifesaving Certificate. 

Mr. Bearden 

126b. Water Safety (0-3- 1 ). 

Focus on skills, theory, teaching progressions, and practice teaching of swimming, 
lifesaving, and beginning swimming. Completion of requirements leads to certification as 
Water Safety Instructor. Prerequisite: currently valid Advanced Lifesaving Certificate. 

Staff 

1 28a. Racquet Sports (0-3- 1 ). 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and 
participation in badminton, racquetball, and squash. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous 
enrollment in Human Performance 105 or 120 or previous enrollment in 101 and 102. 

Mr. Bland 

135a. Basic Gymnastics (0-3-1). 

An introduction to gymnastics. Activities include tumbling, vaulting, and activities on 
parallel bars, side horse, rings, high bar, and balance beam. Prerequisite: concurrent or 
previous enrollment in Human Performance 105 or previous enrollment in 101 and 102. 

Mr. Etnyre 

204b. Psychological Foundations (3-0-3). 

Investigation of the theoretical and empirical psychological foundations of sport and 
physical activity. 

Ms. Poindexter 

205a. Sport and Society (3-0-3). 

A study of the development of contemporary sport and its interrelationships with 
existing social institutions. 

Ms. Lee 

223b. Individual Sports (0-3- 1 ). 

Skill development, knowledge of rules, strategy, concepts of conditioning, and partici- 
pation in archery, golf, and fencing. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in 
Human Performance 105 or previous enrollment in 101 and 102. 

Mr. Bearden 

228a. Tennis (0-3-1). 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and 
participation in tennis. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Human Perform- 
ance 105 or previous enrollment in 101 and 102. 

Ms. Davis 

250b. Anatomy and Physiology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis on gross structure and 
basic concepts of function. 

Mr. Spence 

260b. Sports Management — Public Sector (3-0-3). 

Management theory and practice related to public sector sports programs. 

Mr. Bearden 

300a,b. Sports Management Internship (Credit variable). 

Internship experience for senior students in sports management track. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. 

Ms. Davis 



HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH SCIENCES 333 

302b. Kinesiology (3-0-3). 

Anatomical and mechanical bases of human movement with emphasis on the analysis 
of sport and exercise skills. Prerequisite: Human Performance 120, 250, or permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Shetty 

304b. First Aid, Emergency Care, CPR (2- 1 -2). 

The American Red Cross certification program for emergency care procedures for 
illness, traumatic injuries, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Limited enrollment: 25. Also 
offered as Health 308. 

Staff 

305a. Exceptional Children (3-0-3). 

Areas of exceptionality displayed by children within the school or institution relative to 
the physical educator's role. 

Mr. Bearden 

308b. Program Development in Physical Education (3-0-3) 

Teaching methodology, program development, and implementation of teaching tech- 
niques and class management. For Junior and Senior students. 

Ms. Lee 

311a. Motor Learning (3-0-3). 

Physiological, neurological, and psychological factors affecting voluntary skill acquisi- 
tion and development. 

Ms. Poindexter; Mr. Etnyre 

314a,b. Methods Practicum (0-3- 1 ). 

Practicum in the application of teaching methods in physical education activities. 
Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Human Performance 308. 

Ms. Lee 

319a. Tests and Measurements (3-0-3). 

Introduction to basic statistics, test construction and evaluation, and elementary 
measurement theory in physical education. 

Mr. Disch 

321a. Physiology of Exercise (3-0-3). 

Physiologic response (an adaptation) of the circulatory, respiratory, and muscular 
systems to exercise stress. Prerequisite: Human Performance 120 or permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Spence 

323a. Physiology of Exercise (0-3- 1 ). 

Measuring physiologic response to exercise stress. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment 
in Human Performance 321. 

Mr. Spence 

324b. Officiating (0-3-1). 

Rules and mechanics of officiating basketball and volleyball. 

Mr. Disch 

326a. Training Room Procedures (0-3- 1 ). 

Field application in prevention, management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. 
Limited enrollment: 24. 

Mr. Eggert 



334 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

334b. Team Sports (0-3- 1 ) 

Selected team sports including volleyball and soccer. Prerequisite: HPer 1 24 and two of: 
HPer 122. 126, 128, 135, 223, 228, 337. 

Mr. Disch 

337a. Basic Movement — Dance (0-3- 1 ). 

An introduction to modern dance techniques and improvisation. 

Ms. Phenix 

338b. Dance Technique and Improvisation (0-3- 1 ). 
Modern dance techniques and improvisation. 

Ms. Phenix 

341a. Sports Medicine and Training (3-0-3). 

The following areas are integrated: anatomy and physiology of sports, emphasizing 
orthopedic anatomy and circulorespiratory physiology; clinical medicine; prevention and 
management of athletic injuries. ^ 

Mr. Spence 

350a,b. Coaching Internship (Credit variable). 

Intership experience for senior students in coaching program. Prerequisite: permission 
of instructor. 

Mr. Disch 

361a. Sport Management — Private Sector (3-0-3). 

Management theory and practice related to private sector sports programs. Prerequi- 
site: Human Performance 260 or permission of instructor. 

Ms. Davis 

362b. Sports Information (3-0-3) 

The role of communication media in sports. For junior and senior students only. Not 
offered in 1988-89. 

Ms. Davis. 

375a,b. Sports Science Internship (Credit variable). 

Intership experience for senior students in sports medicine and sports science tracks. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Spence 

41 la. Concepts and Techniques of Athletic Coaching (2-0-2). 

Coaching techniques, concepts, and problems in major athletic sports. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. 

Mr. Etnyre 

412b. Motor Control (3-0-3). 

Exploration of the neurophysiological, behavorial, and biomechanical aspects of motor 
control. Not offered in 1988-89. 

Mr. Etnyre 

Athletic Coaching of Team Sports (2-0-2) 

Study of coaching methods and strategies for developing high level athletic 
performance. 

431b. Coaching of Basketball (2-0-2). 

Mr. Disch 

432b. Coaching of Baseball (2-0-2). 

Mr. Bland 



HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH SCIENCES 335 

433a. Coaching of Football (2-0-2). 

Mr. Bland 

434b. Coaching — Track and Field (2-0-2). 

Mr. Spence 

435b. Coaching — Soccer (2-0-2). 

Staff 

436a. Coaching of Volleyball (2-0-2). 

Mr. Disch 

464b. Sport and the Law (3-0-3). 

Legal aspects of sport and recreation. For junior and senior students only. 

Ms. Davis 

490b. Seminar in Sports Medicine (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics of medical management and rehabilitation of sports related injuries. 
Prerequisite: HPer 250, HPer 341. Not offered in 1988-89. 

Mr. Spence: Staff 

Ms. Lee 

Ms. Lee 

Ms. Poindexter 



495a. Independent Study (Credit variable). 
For junior and senior students only. 



496b. Independent Study (Credit variable). 
See Physical Education 495. 



498a,b. Special Topics (Credit variable). 



Health Courses 

103b. Nutrition (3-0-3). 

Concepts underlying the science of nutrition: food composition; calories, and need for 
energy, special nutrients, and nutritional deficiencies. 

Staff 

107a. Concepts in Health Science (3-0-3). 

Designed to acquaint prospective health educators with the structure and function of 
health in our society. 

Mr. Fitch 

201a. Introduction to Environmental Systems (4-0-4). 

The chemical, physical, and biological components of the environment as natural 
resources and the effect of pollution on their maintenance and utilization. Also offered as 
Environmental Science and Engineering 20 1 . 

Mr. Ward 

208b. Chemical Alterations of Behavior (3-0-3). 

Investigates the use, abuse, and misuse of alcohol, tobacco, and psychoactive drugs. 

Mr. Fitch 



336 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

306b. Human Sexuality (3-0-3). 

Designed to explore the physiological, psychological, and sociological parameters of 
human sexuality, to provide accurate sex information, and to develop healthy attitudes 
toward sexuality. 

Mr. lammarino 

308b. First Aid/Emergency Care/CPR (2- 1 -2). 

American Red Cross certification program for emergency care procedures for illness, 
traumatic injuries, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Enrollment limited to 25. Also 
offered as Physical Education 304. 

Staff 

407a. Diseases of the Human Organism (3-0-3). 

Study of communicable, noncommunicable, and behavioral diseases with emphasis on 
the disease process and basic epidemiologic methods. 

, Mr. lammarino 

410b. Program Development in Health Education (3-0-3) 

Content and methods in teaching health education; program materials and curriculum 
construction in secondary school health education programs. Required for teaching certifi- 
cation in Health. 

Staff 

495a. Independent Studies (Credit variable). 

Mr. lammarino 

496b. Independent Studies (Credit variable). 

Mr. lammarino 

498a,b. Topics in Health Education (Credit variable). 

Mr. lammarino 

Humanities 



Program in Humanities. This program is designed for undergraduates seeking 
a wide-ranging, critical, and integrated introduction to the humanities. In small 
group discussions, occasional lectures, and their own essays, students will encoun- 
ter enduring issues in Western civilization. For students planning a humanities 
major. Humanities 101-102 will provide an excellent foundation for advanced 
study; for other students these courses offer valuable contributions to general 
education. For this reason they are required of all science-engineering, architec- 
ture, and music majors. 

101a, Introduction to Humanities (3-0-3). 

A study of representative works in the Western tradition in literature, philosophy, 
history, art, architecture, and music, from Homer to Shakespeare. Discussion sections, with 
occasional lectures. A foundation course. 

Staff 



HUMANITIES 337 

102b. Introduction to Humanities (3-0-3). 

Continued study, in discussion and occasional lectures, of representative works in the 
Western tradition, from Pascal to Wallace Stevens. A foundation course. 

Staff 

Joint Venture (Business and the Humanities). The Rice Joint Venture Program is 
designed to provide students with majors in the humanities the opportunity to 
explore their interests in a possible business career. Students accepted for the 
program in the fall will register for Humanities 301, which will be offered in the 
spring. The course is an introduction to business with emphasis on basic business 
concepts. As a part of the curriculum, each student will also work part-time for a 
Houston-area business firm during the semester. Students will gain an understand- 
ing of the business community while gaining valuable experience and contacts in 
the business world. 

301b. Introduction to Business (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite - prior acceptance to Joint Venture Internship program or permission of 
instructor. Limited to juniors and seniors. Preference given to humanities majors. 

Ms. Phillips 



Major in Ancient Mediterranean Civilization 

See pp. 157-161 for full description. 



Other Humanities Listings 

201b. Public Speaking (3-0-3). 
Permission of instructor. 

Mr. Huston 

270a. Introduction to Women's Studies (3-0-3). 

Major texts of modern feminist thought (Mary Daly, Susan Griffin, Evelyn Keller, 
Gerda Lerner, Adrienne Rich, Alice Walker, Virginia Wolf). Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Gallop 

3 1 5a. Writing Practicum ( 1 -0- 1 ) . 

Ms. Driskill 

316b. Writing Practicum (1-0-1 ). 

Ms. Driskill 

320b. Introduction to Medieval Culture (3-0-3). 

Insights into literature, art, philosophy, history, science, and cuisine of the middle ages. 
Also listed as English 320. Not offered every year. 

Ms. Chance 

375b. Freud (3-0-3). 

Covers the major writings by the founder of psychoanalysis and explores their impor- 
tance for twentieth century thought. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Gallop 



338 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

385b. Feminism and Sexuality (3-0-3). 

Explores feminist thought on diverse aspects of sexuality (love, pornography, hetero- 
sexuality, fantasy, lesbianism, violence, marriage, power). Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Gallop 



Linguistics and Semiotics 



Professor Lamb, Chair 

Professors Copeland, P.W. Davis, and Tyler 

Associate Professor Urrutibeheity 

Adjunct Professor E.D. Mitchell 

Instructor Chen 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. As language plays an important role throughout 
human life, linguistics is by its nature an interdisciplinary field. The undergradu- 
ate major therefore includes at least two non-linguistics courses, chosen in accor- 
dance with an area of concentration. The major may be undertaken with any of 
three areas of concentration: Cognitive Science, Language, Textual Semiotics. All 
majors are required to take at least eight courses (24 semester hours) in linguistics, 
including at least the three core courses: 300 (Linguistic Analysis), 301 (Phonolo- 
gy), and (402) Syntax and Semantics. The remaining requirements depend on the 
student's area of concentration, as follows: 

Cognitive Science Concentration. Besides the three core courses, the eight 
required courses in linguistics must include at least two of the following: 306 
(Cognitive Linguistics), 3 1 5 (Information Structures), 3 1 7 (Computation for Lin- 
guists), 41 1 (Neurolinguistics). In addition, the major must include at least two 
courses (six semester hours) in cognitive studies in other departments, chosen in 
consultation with the undergraduate major adviser. Appropriate courses in other 
departments include Anthroplogy 406 (Cognitive Anthropology) and relevant 
courses in psychology and computer science. 

Language Concentration. In addition to the eight required courses in linguis- 
tics, at least two semesters in a foreign language at the level of 300 or higher and two 
semesters in another language at the level of 200 or higher. Chinese and Sanskrit 
are especially recommended. 

Textual Semiotics Concentration. At least two semesters in a foreign language 
at the level of 300 or higher and at least two courses in textual semiotics. The latter, 
which may be counted among the eight required courses in linguistics, may be any 
two of the following: English 396 (Language and Philosophy in Literature), 414 
(Hermeneutics and Linguistic Anthropology), 420 (Literary Semiotics), and 
French 491 (Text, Textuality, Literary Modernity). 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82 

Honors Program. The primary purpose of the Honors Program is to provide 
selected undergraduate majors with an opportunity to receive advanced training, 



LINGUISTICS AND SEMIOTICS 339 

particularly in the planning and execution of independent research within their 
chosen areas of specialization in linguistics. A secondary purpose of the program is 
to establish an administrative framework for the formal recognition of outstand- 
ing students. Majors considering a career in linguistics are strongly encouraged to 
apply, as are all others who desire the experience of an intensive, individual 
research project as part of their undergraduate education. 

Application to the Honors Program should be made in person to the under- 
graduate adviser no later than the tenth week of the second semester of a student's 
junior year. In support of the application, the student must prepare a brief 
description of the proposed research project signed by the faculty member who is 
to supervise the work. Acceptance into the program is at the discretion of the 
linguistics faculty. A statement of eligibility requirements and program require- 
ments is available in the departmental office. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program admits students planning to study 
for the Ph.D. degree on a full-time basis. It is structured to ensure for each student a 
thorough grounding in general linguistics and a sound introduction to advanced 
research in some field of special interest. Linguistics at Rice is treated as an 
inherently interdisciplinary field, with connections not only to language and 
literature studies, but also to psychology, anthropology, computer science, and 
philosophy. Study of computer science enhances a student's career opportunities 
as well as his or her research skills. Semiotics, as practiced at Rice, is the still 
broader field resulting from the extension of the concepts and analytical tools of 
linguistics to the broader class of languagelike systems in general, including literary 
and artistic works and other products of human culture as well as information 
systems occurring in nature. 

Undergraduate preparation need not include linguistics courses as such but 
should include courses in at least two of the following areas: anthropology, cogni- 
tive science, computer science, electrical engineering, foreign languages, logic, 
discrete mathematics, philosophy, and psychology. Fellowships are available for 
especially well-qualified students. 

During the first year of residence, each entering graduate student will work 
closely with the linguistics graduate adviser to choose a plan of study congruent 
with the demands of the program and with his or her individual interests. Subse- 
quent training is by course work, seminars, independent field study, and guided 
research. Students are encouraged to select areas of specialization that fit the 
research interests and activities of the faculty. 

All students are expected to acquire a command of general linguistics and to 
select one or two areas of concentration. Recommended areas of concentration 
are: 

Anthropological Linguistics Germanic Linguistics 

Cognitive Science Semiotics 

Computational Linguistics Romance Linguistics 

English Linguistics 

At the end of the second semester of residence, each student is required to 
undergo an oral qualifying examination. The purpose of this examination is to 
assess the student's progress and potential as well as to identify areas of strengths 
and weaknesses. Continuation to the second year requires satisfactory perform- 
ance on this examination. Students who pass with distinction are urged to go on 
directly to the Ph.D. degree. Others are eligible for a master's degree upon 
completion of an appropriate thesis. 



340 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Following successful completion of the qualifying examination, each student, 
on the basis of discussions with faculty members, and in accordance with his or her 
proposed area of concentration, selects a committee of advisers from among the 
faculty, typically a major adviser and two or three minor advisers. The major 
adviser will act as chairman of the committee. During the student's tenure in the 
program, the committee members serve as mentors and assist the student in 
designing an individually tailored program of advanced studies and research. The 
composition of the committee can be changed at any time upon agreement 
between the student and the advisers. Emphasis is placed on a close working 
relationship between the student and the members of this special committee. 

On completion of the required course work and by agreement of the special 
committee, the student presents himself or herself to the faculty for a public 
comprehensive examination. This examination consists of written and oral parts 
and covers general linguistics and the area(s) of concentration. Responsibility for 
administering the examination and the determination of the results rest with the 
student's special committee. The linguistics graduate adviser is an ex-offtcio 
member of each examining committee. 

For the Ph.D. degree, competence in two foreign research languages is re- 
quired. In addition, a structural knowledge of a non-Indo-European language is 
expected. The appropriateness of the languages is determined in consultation with 
the graduate adviser, and in some cases specific research languages may be 
required because of the student's research area. 

In addition to formal instruction, graduate students are given the opportunity 
to gain teaching experience by participating with the faculty in the design of 
courses and instruction of undergraduate students. 

Each student is expected to present a dissertation research proposal to his or 
her special committee, normally by the time of the comprehensive examination. 
Such a proposal is required for admission to candidacy, and it must be approved by 
the student's special committee. At this time a dissertation adviser is selected. 
Normally, this is the chairman of the special committee, but with the agreement of 
the student and the committee members, a different dissertation adviser may be 
selected from within or from outside the special committee. Each student presents 
himself or herself for a public examination in defense of the completed disserta- 
tion. Responsibility for accepting the dissertation rests with the special committee. 



Linguistics 

Linguistics Courses 

200a,b. Language (3-0-3). 

An introduction of the scientific study of language, the methods of linguistic prehistory, 
the language families of the world, and the interrelationships oflanguage and thought. Also 
offered as Anthropology 200. 

Staff 

300b. Linguistic Analysis (3-0-3). 

English and other languages as objects of scientific analysis; phonological structure, 
morphology and syntax, semantic structure, techniques of linquistic analysis. Also offered as 
Anthropology 300. 

Mr. Copeland 



LINGUISTICS AND SEMIOTICS 341 

301a. Phonology (3-0-3). 

Articulatory phonetics, the analysis of speech; structural patterns which underline 
speech sounds. Types of phonological structure found in the world's languages. Also offered 
as Anthropology 301 . 

Mr. Copeland 

305b. Historical Linguistics (3-0-3). 

The processes of linguistic change and their relationships to social and geographical 
contexts. Emphasis on Indo-European. Also offered as Anthropology 305. 

Staff 

306a/b. Cognitive Linguistics (3-0-3). 

The study of linguistic data as evidence for the structure of the cognitive system which 
makes it possible for a speaker of a language to speak and understand the language. 

Mr. Lamb 

309a. Psychology of Language (3-0-3). 

Human and other animal communication, structure of human language, word meaning 
and semantic memory, psychological studies of syntax, bilingualism, language and thought, 
language errors and disorders. Also offered as Psychology 309. 

Staff 

310h. Language Development (3-0-3). 
Also offered as Psychology 3 1 0. 

Staff 

313a. Language and Culture (3-0-3). 

Investigation of the systematic relations between linguistic form and expression and 
culture. Also offered as Anthropology 3 1 3. 

Mr. Tyler 

315a. Information Structures (3-0-3). 

Properties of selected semiotic systems. Relational networks, laws of form, digital logic 
networks. Computer data structures, human cognitive structures. Formerly Linguistics 4 1 5. 

Mr. Lamb 

317a/b. Computation for Linguists (3-0-3). 

Techniques in the computer processing of natural language data. 

Mr. Lamb 

353b. Philosophy of Language (3-0-3). 

Philosophical investigation of relations among language, thought, and reality. Specific 
topics include such notions as analyticity, meaning, reference, and speech act. Prerequisite: 
two courses in linguistics or philosophy. Also offered as Philosophy 353. 

394a. Structure of English Language (3-0-3). 

Introduction to modem English grammar, phonology, and semantics. Also offered as 
English 394. 

Mr. Davis 

395b. History of the English Language (3-0-3). 
Also offered as English 395. 

Mr. Mitchell 

402a/b. Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3). 

Study of semantic categories and their formal expression in morphological, syntactic, 
and lexical units and patterns. Also offered as Anthropology 402. 

Mr. Davis 



342 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

403a/b. Modern Linguistic Theory (3-0-3). 

Selected theories of language from de Saussure to the present. 

Staff 

407a. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3). 

Techniques and practice in the observation, analysis, and recording of a human 
language. Also offered as Anthropology 407. 

Mr. Davis 



408b. Field Techniques and Analysis (3-0-3). 
Continuation of Lingistics 407. 



Mr. Davis 



409a/b. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year. 
Prerequisite: Linguistics 300 or permission of instructor. 

Staff 

411a/b. Neurolinguistics: Language and the Brain (3-0-3). 

Organization of the brain; localization of speech, language, and memory functions; 
hemispheric dominance; pathologies of speech and language associated with brain damage. 
Also offered as Anthropology 411. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Tyler 

414a. Hermeneutics and Linguistic Anthropology (3-0-3. 

Application of linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. 
Discourse analysis; the structure and interpretation of texts and conversation. 

Air. Tyler 

417a/b. Computational Linguistics 

Prereq- Ling 3 1 7 or programming experience. 

Staff 

420b. Literary Semiotics (3-0-3). 

Studies in application of semiotic models to the study of literature. 

Mr. Kaiiffman 

423a/b. The Spanish Language (3-0-3). 

Synchronic study of modern Spanish phonology and syntax, including peninsular and 
Hispanic-American variants. Also offered as Spanish 423. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Urrutibeheity 

424a/b. Studies in Hispanic Linguistics (3-0-3). 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Also offered as Spanish 
515. 

Mr. Urrutibeheity 

425a/b. Romance Linguistics (3-0-3). 

Also offered as Spanish 575. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Urrutibeheity 

432a/b. German Applied Linguistics and Teaching Methodology (3-0-3). 

Contrastive study of German and English combined with problems in teaching meth- 
ods and the development and evaluation of teaching materials. Also offered as German 432. 
Not offered every year. 

Mr. Copeland 



LINGUISTICS AND SEMIOTICS 343 

433a/b. Structure of the German Language (3-0-3). 

Synchronic study of modern German phonology, syntax, and semantics, including 
aspects of discourse structure. Also offered as German 403. Not offered every year. 

Mr. Copeland 

434a/b. History of the German Language (3-0-3). 

Aspects of the history of German phonology, syntax, and semantics (with related 
systems) from its Proto-Indo-European origins to the present. Also offered as German 404. 
Not offered every year. 

Mr. Copeland 

435a/b. Topics in Germanic Linguistics 

1989 Topic: Historical Germanic Syntax. Also offered as Germ 435. 

Mr. Copeland 

440a. The Chinese Novel (3-0-3). 

An exploration via translation into the symbolic and structural world of the traditional 
Chinese novel. The structural principles, symbolism, and aesthetic assumptions in China's 
rich literary tradition, with special attention given to the greatest of all Chinese novels. 
Dream of the Red Chamber. 

Ms. Chen 

443b. Chinese Linguistics (3-0-3). 
Not offered every year. 

Ms. Chen 

467a/b. Computational Linguistics Projects (3-0-3). 

Mr. Lamb 

470a. Language Description (3-0-3). 

Theory and practice of describing linguistic and conceptual systems. 

Mr. Lamb 



481a,b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 
482a,b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 



500a. Linguistic Analysis (3-0-3). 

Techniques of linguistic analysis and description. 



501a. Phonology (3-0-3). 
See Linguistics 301. 



502a/b. Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3). 
See Lingusitics 402. 



Mr. Davis, Mr. Copeland 
Ms. Chen, Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Copeland 

Mr. Davis 



503a/b. Modern Linguistic Theory (3-0-3). 

See Linguistics 403. _ ^.^ 

505a/b. Historical Linguistics (3-0-3). 

See Linguistics 305. „ ^-- 



344 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



506a/b. Cognitive Linguistics (3-0-3). 
See Linguistics 306. 



507a. Field Techniques and Analysis (Credit variable). 
See Linguistics 407. 



508b. Field Techniques and Analysis (Credit variable). 
Continuation of Linguistics 507. 



515a. Information Structures (3-0-3) 
See Linguistics 315. 



516b. Studies in Hispanic Linguistics (3-0-3). 



Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Davis 

Mr. Davis 

Mr. Lamb 
Mr. Urrutibeheity 



550a,b. Departmental Colloquium ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

Faculty, graduate students, and invited guests meet weekly to present reports on current 
research or to discuss current issues in linguistics and semiotics. 

Mr. Copeland 

551a/b. Seminar in Phonology (3-0-3). 

Mr. Lamb 

552a/b. Seminar in Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3). 



553. Seminar In Linguistic Structure (3-0-3). 
Not Offered every year. 



555. Seminar in Historical Linguistics (3-0-3). 
Not offered every year. 



565a/b. Seminar in Semiotics (3-0-3). 
Not offered every year. 



567a/b. Seminar in Computational Linguistics (3-0-3). 
Not offered every year. 



581a. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

582b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

583a. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

584b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 



Mr. Davis 

Mr. Lamb 

Staff 

Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Copeland 

Mr. Copeland 

Mr. Lamb 

Mr. Lamb 



LINGUISTICS AND SEMIOTICS 345 
585a. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 



586b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

587a. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

588b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

589a,b. Graduate Research (Credit Variable). 

590a,b. Teaching Linguistics (Credit variable). 

636b. Teaching English as a Foreign Language (1-0-1 
800a,b. Graduate Research (Credit variable). 

Languages 

Chinese Courses 

101a. Elementary Chinese I (3-1-4). 

102b. Elementary Chinese II (3- 1 -4). 

201a. Intermediate Chinese I (3-0-3). 

202b. Intermediate Chinese II (3-0-3). 

Sanskrit Courses 

301a. Introduction to Sanskrit I (3-0-3). 

302b. Introduction to Sanskrit II (3-0-3). 



Mr. Davis 

Mr. Davis 

Mr. Miiclu'll 

Mr. Mitchell 

Ms. Chen 

Staff 

Mr. Davis 



Ms. Chen 
Ms. Chen 
Ms. Chen 
Ms. Chen 

Mr. Mitchell 
Mr. Mitchell 



346 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Managerial Studies 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

Undergraduate Program. Students majoring in managerial studies are re- 
quired to take the following ten courses: Accounting 305, Computer Science 100, 
Economics 211 and 448, Mathematical Sciences 376, Statistics 280, Political 
Science 309 and 310, and Psychology 101 and 231. Students may satisfy the 
Computer Science, Mathematical Sciences, and Statistics required courses by 
alternatives. In addition, students must take five electives from a list of approved 
courses in Accounting, Computer Science, Economics, Mathematical Sciences, 
Statistics, Political Science, and Psychology. All prospective majors should obtain 
the program information sheets and advising notes from the Program Director, 
Dr. Stephen A. Zeff, 352 Herring Hall, for full particulars about the major. 



Managerial Studies Courses 

495a. Senior Honors Thesis (3-0-3). 

Completion of senior honors thesis. Open only to seniors in the managerial studies 
honors program. 

Mr. Zeff 

496b. Senior Honors Thesis (3-0-3). 
See Managerial Studies 495. 

Mr. Zeff 

497a. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by 
special permission. 

Mr. Zeff 

498b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 
See Managerial Studies 497. 

Mr Zeff 



Mathematics 



Professor Harvey, Chair 

Professors Curtis (Emeritus), Hardt, Hempel, B.F. Jones, 

Polking, Semmes, Veech, and Wells 

Associate Professors Boshernitzan and Yang 

Assistant Professors Forman, Gao, Poon, and Wolf 

Instructors Choe, Galicki, Garrity, and Smith 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 



MATHEMATICS 347 

Undergraduate Program. There are two programs for students majoring in 
mathematics. 

1. Regular major. Mathematics 101, 102 or 121, 122 and 21 1, 212 or 221, 
222 and at least 24 semester hours (eight courses) in courses numbered 
300 or above in the Department of Mathematics. Student can receive 
advanced placement credit for Mathematics 1 1 by achieving a score of 4 
or 5 on the ARAB level test or for Mathematics 101 and 102byachicvinga 
score of 4 or 5 on the BC level test. Students who have had calculus but 
have not taken the AP test may petition the Department of Mathematics 
for a waiver of the calculus requirements for a major in mathematics. 
Entering students are encouraged to enroll in the most advanced course 
commensurate with their background. 

2. Double major. The requirements for the double major are the same as 
above with the exception that up to nine of the 24 semester hours 
numbered 300 or above can be replaced by approved mathematics- 
related courses. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in mathematics will be 
granted to a limited number of students who have indicated ability for advanced 
and original work. Normally, one or two years are required after the bachelor's 
degree to obtain an M.A. degree and three or four years to obtain a Ph.D. An M.A. 
is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. 

A number of graduate scholarships and fellowships are available and will be 
awarded on the basis of merit. As part of the graduate education in mathematics, 
each graduate student is normally expected to engage in teaching or other instruc- 
tional duties. Generally, less than six hours a week is devoted to such duties. 

Qualifying Examinations. The qualifying examinations in mathematics con- 
sist of two parts: the general examination and the advanced examination. 

1 . General examination. It consists of three parts, covering algebra, analysis, 
and topology. The examination will be given twice a year, in mid-Septem- 
ber and in mid-January. A student should take this examination after the 
third semester of graduate study or sooner. A student who fails one or 
more parts of the general examination may, with the approval of the 
departmental graduate committee, be allowed to retake the appropriate 
part(s) at the next scheduled examination time. A student generally will 
not be allowed to take any part of the general examination more than two 
times. 

2. Advanced oral examination. After completing the general examination, 
the student should prepare for an advanced oral examination by selecting 
some special field (e.g., homotopy theory, several complex variables, 
group theory, etc.) and submitting the topic to the departmental graduate 
committee for approval. The time of the advanced examination will be 
scheduled by the graduate committee and will normally be within six to 
nine months after the general examination. A student who fails the 
advanced examination may, with the approval of the graduate commit- 
tee, be allowed to retake it (on the same or possibly a different topic) but 



348 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

will generally not be allowed to take the advanced examination more than 
two times. 
Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1. Satisfactory completion (grade of "B" or better) of a course of study 
approved by the department and fulfillment of the general rules of the 
University (described on pages 1 26-1 27). Transfer of credits from anoth- 
er university will be allowed only when approved by both the department 
and the University Graduate Council. 

2. Satisfactory performance on an examination in at least one approved 
foreign language (French, German, or Russian). 

Other requirements for the master's degree may be satisfied in either of the 
following ways: 

1 . Completion of all the requirements for qualification as a candidate for the 
doctoral degree as given below. 

2. Presentation and oral defense of an original thesis acceptable to the 
department. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Satisfactory completion (grade of "B" or better) of a course of study 
approved by the department. Transfer of credits from another university 
will be allowed only when approved by both the department and the 
University Graduate Council. 

2. Satisfactory performance on both the general and advanced qualifying 
examinations described above. 

3. Satisfactory performance on examinations in two approved foreign lan- 
guages (French, German, or Russian). 

4. The writing of an original thesis acceptable to the department. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis. 

6. Any other conditions required by the general rules of the University 
(described on pages 127-132). 



Mathematics Courses 

101a,b. Single Variable Calculus I (4-0-4). 

Differentiation, extrema, Newton's method, integration, fundamental theorem of 
calculus, area, volume, natural logarithm, exponential. 

102a,b. Single Variable Calculus II (4-0-4). 

Techniques of integration, arc length, surface area, Simpson's rule, L'Hopital's rule. 
Infinite sequences and series, tests for convergence, power series, radius of convergence. 
Students may receive credit for only one of 1 1 , 111, 121 and also for only one of 1 02, 122. 

Ilia. Introduction to Calculus and Its Applications I (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on problem solving and applications. Topics of 1 1 1, 112 are those of 101, 
1 02. Not intended for science or engineering students. However, students who need a slower 
development of calculus may receive credit for 1 1 1, 1 12, and 102. 

1 12b. Introduction to Calculus and Its Applications II (3-0-3). 



MATHEMATICS 349 

121a. Honors Calculus I (4-0-4). 

Covers the material of Mathematics 101,102 with more emphasis on theoretical as- 
pects. Prerequisite: departmental permission. 

122b. Honors Calculus II (4-0-4). 
See Mathematics 121. 

211a^b. Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra (4-0-4). 

Separable equations, first order linear equations, nth order linear equations with 
constant coefficients, Laplace transforms. Vector spaces, dimension, eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors of matrices. Systems of linear first order differential equations, exponential of a 
matrix. Qualitative theory of nonlinear systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

212a,b. Multivariable Calculus (4-0-4). 

Gradient, divergence, and curl. Lagrange multipliers. Multiple intergrals. Spherical 
coordinates. Line integrals, conservative vector fields, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem. 
Gauss' theorem. 

221a. Honors Calculus III (3-0-3). 

This course and Mathematics 222 include the material of Mathematics 2 1 2 and more. 
Topology of R", calculus for functions of several variables, linear and multilinear algebra, 
theory of determinants, inner product spaces, exterior differential calculus, integration on 
manifolds. Existence theorems for ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathemat- 
ics 122 or permission of department. A student may not receive credit for Mathematics 222 
and 212. 

222b. Honors Calculus IV (3-0-3). 
See Mathematics 22 1 . 

312b. Principles of Analysis (3-0-3). 

A careful treatment of the topology of R", convergence of sequences and series of 
functions, the implicit function theorem, existence theorems for ODEs, and related topics. 
Not open to students with Mathematics 222. 

355a. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Linear transformations and matrices, solution of linear equations, eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors, quadratic forms, rational canonical form, Jordan canonical form. 

356b. Abstract Algebra (3-0-3). 

Groups: normal subgroups, factor groups, Abelian groups. Rings: ideals, Euclidean 
rings, and unique factorization. Fields: algebraic extensions, finite fields. Students may not 
take this course and Mathematics 463. 

365a. Number Theory (3-0-3). 

Properties of numbers depending mainly on the notion of divisibility. Continued 
fractions. Offered alternate years. Offered 1988-89. 

366b. Projective Geometry (3-0-3). 

Basic elements of classical projective geometry: projective spaces, subspaces, incidence 
relations, comparison with other geometries. Offered alternate years. Offered 1989-90. 

381a. Analysis and Applications (3-0-3). 

Laplace transform: inverse transform, applications to constant coefficient differential 
equations. Boundary value problems: Fourier series, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomi- 
als. A student may not receive credit for this course and Mathematical Sciences 340. 



350 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

382b. Complex Analysis (3-0-3). 

Cauchy integral theorem, Taylor series, residues, evaluation of integrals by means of 
residues, conformal mapping. Special topcis such as the Riemann mapping theorem, elliptic 
functions, the prime number theorem, Riemann surfaces. Application to two-dimensional 
fluid flow. A student may not receive credit for this course and Mathematics 427 or 
Mathematical Sciences 330. 

401a. Differential Geometry (3-0-3). 

Differentiable manifolds, Stokes' theorem and deRham's theorem, fundamental theo- 
rem of local Riemannian geometry, Lie groups, vector bundles, affine connections. 

402b. Differential Geometry (3-0-3). 

See Mathematics 401. 

423a. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

Theory of distributions. Wave equation, Laplace's equation, heat equation. Fundamen- 
tal solutions. Other topics include first order hyperbolic systems, Cauchy-Kowalewski 
theorem, potential theory, Dirichlet and Neumann problems, integral equations, elliptic 
equations. 

424b. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3). 
See Mathematics 423. 

425a. Real Analysis (3-0-3). 

Lebesgue theory of measure and integration. 

426b. Topics In Real Analysis (3-0-3). 

Topics vary. Past topics include: Fourier series, harmonic analysis, probabilty theory, 
advanced topics in measure theory, ergodic theory. 

427b. Complex Analysis (3-0-3). 

Cauchy-Riemann equations, power series, Cauchy's integral formula, residue calculus, 
conformal rnappings. Special topics such as the Riemann mapping theorem, elliptic func- 
tions, the prime number theorem, Riemann surfaces. 

443a. General Topology (3-0-3). 

Basic point set topology. Includes set theory, well ordering. Metrization. 

444b. Geometrical Topology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to algebraic methods in topology and differential topology. Elementary 
homotopy theory. Covering spaces. 

463a. Algebra I (3-0-3). 

Groups, rings, fields, vector spaces. Matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, canonical 
forms, multilinear algebra. Structure theorem for finitely generated abelian groups. Galois 
theory. 

464b. Algebra II (3-0-3). 
See Mathematics 463. 

466. Topics in Algebra (3-0-3). 

490a,b. Supervised Reading (Variable). 

501a, 502b. Topics in Differential Geometry (3-0-3 each semester). 

Topics include the Atiyah-Singer theorem, relativity theory, geometric measure theory, 
Kahler manifolds. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 3 5 1 

517a, 518b. Mathematical Physics (3-0-3 each semester). 

Topics include mathematical aspects of relativity theory, classical field theory, twistor 
theory, quantum field theory, supermanifolds, super Lie algebras. 

523. Functional Analysis (3-0-3). 

Locally convex spaces, Banach and Hilbert spaces, special topics. 

525a, 526b. Advanced Topics in Complex Analysis (3-0-3 each semester). 
Topics include Stein manifolds, analytic spaces, compact complex manifolds. 

537a. Algebraic Topology (3-0-3). 
Singular homology and cohomology. 

538b. Algebraic Topology (3-0-3). 

Homotopy theory, Serre spectral sequence, applications. 

541a, 542b. Advanced Topics in Topology (3-0-3 each semester). 

Geometic topology, 3-manifolds, differential topology, topological dynamics, Lie 
groups. 

800a,b. Thesis and Research (Variable). 

Military Science 



Adjunct Professor Slayton 

Although Rice University no longer has its own Military Science program 
(Army ROTC), men and women students may participate through cross-enroll- 
ment with the University of Houston. This cross-enrollment is an arrangement 
between the student and the Military Science Department at the University of 
Houston. Academic transfer credit will be included on the student's transcipt. No 
tuition is charged for the courses. Training in military leadership and management 
is emphasized with instruction given in subjects common to all branches of the 
U.S. Army. Eligible students have the option of completing Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps courses in either a four-year or a two-year program. 

Graduates of the Army ROTC program are commissioned in the Regular 
Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard in the various branches of the U.S. Army 
based on the needs of the Army, academic discipline, personal preference, recom- 
mendation of the professor of military science, demonstrated ability, and prior 
military training or experience. 

Four- Year Program. The four-year program consists of the Basic Course 
(Military Science I and II), taken during the first and second years, and the 
Advanced Course (Military Science III and IV), taken during the third and fourth 
years. 

Two- Year Program. Students with two years of study remaining who have not 
participated in the Basic Course are eligible for the two-year program. Students 
must successfully complete the six-week Basic Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, 
during the summer to qualify for the Advanced Course. The Basic Camp substi- 
tutes for Military Science I and II. Veterans who have served on active duty for at 



352 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

least two years may enroll in the Advanced Course without taking the Basic 
Course. 

Advanced Camp. All students in the Advanced Course must attend a six-week 
Advanced Camp at Fort Riley, Kansas, between their junior and senior years. Each 
student is paid approximately $600 for the six-week period. 

Leadership Laboratory. All students in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(ROTC) program must participate in a weekly, two-hour leadership laboratory. 

Scholarships. Two- and three-year scholarships are available on a competitive 
basis to students who participate in the Army ROTC program. Special two- and 
three-year scholarships are available for nonenrolled students. Each scholarship 
student will be eligible for annual tuition assistance of up to $7,000 or 80% of 
tuition, whichever is greater. Scholarship students will also receive a $ 1 00 monthly 
stipend and the Army will pay for educational fees assessed by the university 
(student health, athletic, lab fees, etc) up to a maximum amount set annually by the 
U.S. Army Cadet Command. 

Nonscholarship Students. Nonscholarship students receive $100 per month 
during the Advanced Course. 

For more information, contact the Military Science department at the Uni- 
versity of Houston, (713) 749-4394. 



Military Science Courses 

101a. Defense Establishment and National Security ( 1 -2-0). 

An introduction to the customs, courtesies, and organization of the U.S. Army. A study 
of the Department of Defense and the U.S. Army's role in current world affairs. Military 
skills leadership laboratory is required. 

Staff 

102b. Defense Establishment and National Security (1-2-1 ). 

Continuation of 1 1 a. An introduction to the customs, courtesies, and organization of 
the U.S. Army. A study of the Department of Defense and the U.S. Army's role in current 
world affairs. Military skills leadership laboratory is required. Students must complete both 
1 1 and 1 02 in order to receive academic credit. 

Staff 

201a. Basic Tactics and Military Operations (3-2-1 ). 

An introduction to small unit tactics, wargaming, and map reading. Military skills 
leadership laboratory required. 

Staff 

202b. Management of the Military (3-2- 1 ). 

A study of training management, oral communication skills, and the role of the 
professional soldier. Military skills leadership laboratory required. 

Staff 

301a. Advanced Tactics and Military Operations(3-2-2). 

Military planning, operations, advanced tactics and wargaming. Prerequisite: basic 
course qualification or consent of chairman. Military skills leadership laboratory required. 

Staff 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 353 

302b. Leadership Development (3-2-2). 

The study of individual and group behavior and the principles and techniques of 
applied leadership. Prerequisite: Military Science 30 1 or consent of chairman. Military skills 
leadership laboratory required. 

Staff 

401a. Professional Ethics and Military Justice(3-2-2). 

A study of the military justice system, aspects of military law, the Geneva Convention, 
and military professionalism/ethics. Prerequisites: Military Science 301 and 302 or consent 
of chairman. Military skills leadership laboratory is required. 

Mr. Slayton 

402b. Management of the Military Team (3-2- 1 ). 

A study of the combined arms team, command and staff relationships, and army 
support organizations. Prerequisite: Military Science 401 or consent of chairman. Military 
skills leadership laboratory is required. 

Staff 



The Shepherd School of Music 



Professor Hammond, Dean 

Professors Arad, Babikian, Cooper, Ellison, Fliegel, HoUoway, S. Jones, 

Milburn, Luca, Schnoebelen, Tipton, Trepel, and Wicks 

Associate Professors Bailey, Burt, Citron, 

Gottschalk, and Pickar 

Assistant Professors Arbiter, R. Brown, Lavenda, and Meconi 

Lecturers DeWitt, Dye, Kirk, Malone, and Rose 

Artist Teachers Addison, Atherholt, Bacon, Brooks, Caballero, 

Chaisson, Connelly, Griebling, Kamins, Lombard, Mayer, Newton, 

Page, Perry, Shank, and Waters 

Artists in Residence Bible 

Adjunct Lecturer Visser 

Degrees Offered: B.A.; B.Mus.; B.Mus./M.Mus., (simultaneously); M.Mus.; 
D.M.A. 

The Shepherd School of Music is committed to the highest quality education 
of musicians and offers both professional training and a broad liberal arts curricu- 
lum at the undergraduate level. At the graduate level, it offers professional music 
training for qualified students in programs of performance, creativity, and 
scholarship. 

Degrees Offered. The Shepherd School of Music offers four degrees: Bachelor 
of Arts degree in music; the Bachelor of Music degree in performance, composi- 
tion, music history, and music theory; the Master of Music degree in performance, 
composition, choral and instrumental conducting, musicology, and music theory; 
and the Doctor of Musical Ails degree in composition and selected areas of 
performance. Normally, four years are required for the bachelor's degrees and two 
years for the master's. Qualified students may elect an honors program that leads 
to the simultaneous awarding of the Bachelor of Music and Master of Music 
degrees after five years of study. 



354 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Admission. An audition, either in person or on tape, and a theory evaluation 
are required of each undergraduate applicant. Undergraduate admission is deter- 
mined jointly by the Shepherd School faculty and by the Admission Committee of 
Rice University, which bases its evaluation upon successful academic achieve- 
ment and standard college admission indices. 

Transfer students from other colleges, conservatories, and universities are 
evaluated in terms of prior preparation, which may reduce the required period of 
study at Rice. An audition, personal or taped, and placement exams in both music 
history and music theory are required of transfer applicants. 

An audition or personal interview, and placement exams in music history and 
music theory are required of graduate applicants. The Graduate Record Examina- 
tion, including the advanced music tests, is required of graduate applicants in 
musicology, theory, and composition. 

Curriculum Design. Undergraduate curricula consist of core music courses, 
applied music, other required music courses, chamber music and large ensembles, 
non-music courses as specified by the University, and electives. Music majors are 
entitled to one hour of private lessons each week each semester they are enrolled as 
a music major. Private or group lessons beyond this may result in additional fees. 
After the required four semesters of instrumental or vocal study, students in the 
B.A. in music program who wish to continue taking private lessons must secure 
permission. All undergraduate majors are required to take the following core 
courses! 

Music Theory: 211, 212, 311, 312, 41 1 

Music History: 221, 222, 321, 322, 421 

Aural Skills: 231, 232, 331, 332, 431 

Students in the B.A. in music program take all of the above, with the exception 
of Aural Skills 33 1 , 332, and 43 1 . Requirements in other music areas vary with the 
degree program. Further information on curricular requirements for all majors 
and degree programs may be obtained from The Shepherd School of Music. 

Information on University Distribution Requirements and Foundation 
courses may be found elsewhere in this catalogue. For music majors, 6 hours of 
music history may be counted as humanities (Group I, 2) and 3 hours of acoustics 
may be counted toward physical science (Group III, 5). 

The B.Mus./M.Mus. program includes the core curriculum and an advanced 
curriculum. The first five semesters parallel the core curriculum of the four-year 
degrees. The sixth semester is a transitional semester in which the student must 
qualify for formal admission to candidacy for the master's degree as well as begin 
work in the advanced curriculum. If qualifying does not take place by the end of the 
sixth semester, the student is not allowed to register for the advanced curriculum 
without special permission. At least five distribution courses (preferably six) must 
be completed by the end of the sixth semester before the student is considered for 
formal admission to candidacy for the master's degree. 

The final two years are devoted to the advanced curriculum, in which the 
student concentrates on creativity, performance, or research supported by labora- 
tory or performing ensembles, theory and history seminars, and professional 
apprenticeships. Apprenticeships may involve a diversity of professional activi- 
ties as appropriate for the individual. These may include participation with major 
or civic orchestras, choirs, or opera theaters; off-campus solo and small ensemble 
performances; conducting apprenticeships with professional orchestras, operas, 



I 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 355 



or ballet companies; composition for films, television, public schools, and for 
ensembles in residence; and research in major national and international libraries. 
It is the responsibility of students to arrange their apprenticeships. Whenever 
possible, faculty members assist students in making arrangements for apprentice- 
ships. These and any other specialized studies must be engaged by the individual 
student with the approval of the faculty. 

Special Examinations: 

1 . At the end of each semester, a jury examination is given in applied music 
over the material studied during the semester. 

2. Keyboard proficiency is required of all degree candidates except B.A. 
students and must be satisfied by examination. If the student has little or 
no knowledge of the keyboard, enrollment in secondary piano beginning 
in the student's first semester is encouraged until the examination re- 
quirements are met. 

3. Students on four-year undergraduate degree programs take, at the end of 
the fourth semester, an examination in aural skills to determine continu- 
ance on their degree program. 

4. Students on the five-year program must take a qualifying examination no 
later than the sixth semester to determine admissibility to the student's 
preferred major area in the advanced curriculum. For performance ma- 
jors, this examination consists of the qualifying recital and an oral exami- 
nation in music history and music theory based on the compositions to be 
performed on the qualifying recital. The Graduate Record Examination 
is required by the conclusion of the sixth semester for music history, 
theory, and composition majors. 

Performance and Large Ensembles. Students are expected to perform fre- 
quently during their residence at Rice. Performance majors must present at least 
two full recitals. Composition and conducting students are expected to present 
recitals as specified by their degree programs. Students are expected to attend both 
faculty and student recitals. In addition, all music majors are required to partici- 
pate in the school's conducted ensembles as assigned. 

Thesis. The master's degree for composition, conducting, music history, and 
theory majors assumes a high level of scholarship. A thesis is required of music 
history and theory majors. An original work of extended scope is required of 
composition majors. Conducting majors must present either an extended compo- 
sition or project. 

Warning, Music School Probation, Discontinuation. A student performing 
unsatisfactorily in one or more courses at the midterm period may be placed on 
warning. If at the end of the semester significant improvement has not been shown, 
the student may be placed on music probation. A student may be placed directly on 
probation without warning. Probation is a more serious status than warning, and it 
signifies that the student's work has been sufficiently unsatisfactory to preclude 
graduation unless significant improvement is achieved promptly. A student on 
music probation may be absent from class only for extraordinary reasons and may 
not represent the school in any public function not directly a part of a degree 
program. 

If at the conclusion of the probationary period the student has not shown 
marked improvement, the student may be discontinued from the school as a music 



356 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

major. Any student discontinued as a music major but not on academic suspension 
may elect a major elsewhere in the University, subject to the requirements of the 
major department or school. 

A minimum grade of B- is expected of all music students in their major applied 
area. A grade of C will be evaluated in the following manner. If in the first five 
semesters of an undergraduate degree program a student receives a grade of C in 
his applied area, he will be placed on music warning. If the student receives a 
second C, he will be placed on music probation. With a third C in his major applied 
area, the student will be discontinued as a music major. 

Courses for Non-majors. Non-majors will find the following courses designed 
for the general student: Music 117, 118; 224; 225; 307, 308; 317,318; 327, 328; 
334, 335; individual instruction in all instruments: Music 151-197. 

In addition, other music courses may be taken by the non-major with the 
permission of the instructor and approval of the Dean of the Shepherd School. 

Musical Opportunities. Musical and educational opportunities are afforded 
the student both on campus and in the greater Houston area. A visiting lecturer 
series, a professional concert series, and numerous visiting distinguished musi- 
cians contribute to the Shepherd School environment. The Houston Symphony 
Orchestra, Symphony Chorale, Houston Grand Opera, Texas Opera Theater, 
Houston Ballet, Concert Chorale of Houston, as well as the activities of other- 
institutions of higher learning in the area provide exceptional opportunities for 
musical experiences. 



Composition 

Music Courses 

201a. Composition I (3-0-3). 

Creative composition employing midcentury vocabularies supported by extensive 

performance, hstenmg, and analysis of related scores. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper. Mr. Gottschalk. Mr. Jones. Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

202b. Composition I! (3-0-3). 

Creative composition employing current musical vocabularies, supported by appropri- 
ate performance, listening, and analysis. 

Mr. Burt. Mr. Cooper. Mr. Gottschalk. Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda. Mr. Milburn 

301a. Composition III (3-0-3). 

Mr. Burt. Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

302b. Composition IV (3-0-3). 

Mr. Burt. Mr. Cooper. Mr. Gottschalk. Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

303a, 304b. Undergraduate Composition Seminar I, II (Credit variable). 

Mr. Gottschalk 

305a, 306b. Composition Elective (3-0-3 each semester). 

307a, 308b. Composition for Nonmajors I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 357 

401a, 402b. Composition V, VI (3-0-3 each semester). 

Mr. Burt. Mr. Cooper. Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

405a, 406b. Composition Elective (3-0-3 each semester). 

407. Music for Film (2 credits). 

Lectures focusing on instances where music has made a decisive impact on the meaning 
and vitality of various films. Generalized functions of film music (pacing, characterization, 
psychological extension, structural delineation) are examined with reference to dramatic 
intent. No prior technical knowledge of either medium is assumed. Explanation or definition 
is offered where needed. Some background in film or music is preferred. 

Mr. Burt 

408. Film Music Lab ( 1 credit). 

Discussions centering on detailed analysis of specific "cues" with the goal towards a 
collaboration with a filmmaker on the composition of a sound track for a short film. Lab is 
open to composers and is to be taken concurrently with Music 407. 

Mr. Burt 

501a, 502b. Advanced Composition I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 
Composition for large ensembles. 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

503a, 504b. Electronic Music Composition (1-6-3 each semester). 

Mr. Gottschalk 

505. Composition for Media ( 1 -6-3). 
Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Milburn 

601a, 602b. Advanced Composition III, IV (3-0-3 each semester). 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

603a, 604b. Graduate Composition Seminar I, II (Credit variable). 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

701, 702. Advanced Composition V, VI (3 credits). 
Advanced composition for doctoral students. 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

703, 704. Advanced Composition VII, VIII (3 credits). 
Advanced composition for doctoral students. 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

705, 706. Advanced Composition IX, X (3 credits). 
Advanced composition for doctoral students. 

Mr. Burt, Mr. Cooper, Mr. Gottschalk, Mr. Jones, Mr. Lavenda, Mr. Milburn 

707. Doctoral Independent Study in Composition (3 credits). 
Major symphonic or symphonic/choral work of professional level. 

Staff 

711. Analytical Approaches (3 credits). 

An examination of critical passages from chosen works and with specific reference to 
central points of view in the writings of Schenker, Forte, Babbitt, Cone. 

Mr. Burt 



358 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Theory 

Music Courses 

1 1 la. Theoretical Studies I (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Fundamentals, part-writing, diatonic harmony, and introduction to 
analytical techniques. 

112b. Theoretical Studies II (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Continuation of Music 111. Introduction to counterpoint, chromatic 
harmony, and form. 

117a,b. FundamentalsofMusicI (3-0-3). 

For nonmusic majors with minimal music preparation. Rudiments of pitch and dura- 
tion. Study of scales, chord structure tonality, and forms. 

1 18b. Fundamentals of Music II (3-0-3). 

Application of Music 1 1 7 materials. Creative work utilizing twentieth-century art and 
popular vocabulary. 

211a. Honors Theory I (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Theory evaluation survey is required prior to admission to class. 
Introduction to part-writing, counterpoint, and analysis of music up to c. 1800. 

Mr. Lavenda 

212b. Honors Theory II (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Discussion, analysis, and creative application of theoretical concepts 
and vocabulary from 1 800 to present. 

Mr. Lavenda 

311a. Theoretical Studies III (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Baroque and Early Classical music. Study of species counterpoint 
and of two-three-four voice tonal counterpoint. Analysis of representative compositions of 
diverse genre and medium. 

Mr. Gottschalk 

312b. Theoretical Studies IV (3-0-3). 

For music majors. Late Classical and Romantic music. Chromatic harmony. Analysis 
of selected major works. 

Mr. Gottschalk 

317a. Theory for Nonmajors I (3-0-3). 

For nonmusic majors with appreciable instrumental and/or high school theory back- 
ground. Discussion, analysis, and application of the parameters of music: melody, rhythm, 
harmony, counterpoint, instrumentation, and form. Application to literature to 1 700. 

318b. Theory for Nonmajors II (3-0-3). 

For nonmusic majors with appreciable instrumental and/or high school theory back- 
ground. Prerequisite: 3 1 7 or permission of instructor. Stylistic harmony, melody, and form 
from 1 700 to the present. 

411a. Theoretical Studies V (3-0-3). 

Music of the twentieth century. Compositional devices from 1 900-present. Analysis of 
selected major works. 

Mr. Milhurn. Mr. Lavenda 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 359 

412b. Theoretical Studies VI (3-0-3). 

Advanced analytical techniques. Practical applications of principal analytical systems 
from the Middle Ages to the present. 

Mr. Jones 

414b. Acoustics (3-0-3). 

Survey of acoustical considerations, including physics of sound, anatomical mechanics 
of aural perception, psychoacoustics, and environmental acoustics. 

Mr. Gottschalk 

51 la. Graduate Theory Review (2-0-2). 

Mr. Burt 

513a. Modal Counterpoint (2-0-2). 

An in-depth examination of the vocal polyphony of the 1 6th century, with practical 
applications of contrapuntal techniques. 

Mr. Gottschalk 

515a, 516b. Advanced Orchestration I, II (2-0-1 each semester). 

Mr. Jones, Mr. Milburn 

517a. Special Studies-Music Theory Analytical Systems (3-0-3). 

Staff 

611a, 612b. Pedagogy ofTheory I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Principal learning theories and philosophies of learning and teaching. Examination and 
critique of college-level materials. 

Mr. Milburn 

613b. Canon and Fugue (2-0-2). 

Specialized study of imitative counterpoint. Examples from the fifteenth to twentieth 
centuries. Emphasis on the Baroque fugue. 

Mr. Milburn 



Staff 



614a,b. Selected Studies in Music Theory (3-0-3). 
Advanced study of the music of a single composer.. 

715a. History ofTheory (3-0-3). 

History and Literature 

Music Courses 

221a, 222b. Historical Studies I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Historical study of musical style. Introduction, first semester; Medieval and Renais- 
sance, second semester. 

Ms. Meconi 

224. Introduction to Opera (3-0-3). 

Introductory course focusing on historical, musical, and literary aspects of selected 
operas, including those in Houston Grand Opera current session. No prerequisite. Offered 
irregularly. 

Ms. Schnoebelen 



360 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



321a, 322b. Historical Studies III, IV (3-0-3 each semester). 

Historical studies in music of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 
Baroque, Pre-Classical, first semester; Classical and Romantic, second semester Correlated 
with Music 311, 312 and 331, 332. 

Ms. Schnoebelen, Ms. Citron 

325, Baroque String/Continuo Performance (credit variable). 

This course combines the theoretical and pragmatic approaches to Baroque music 
performance problems for string and continuo players. Research from treatises on various 
topics will be discussed in weekly classes and then applied to the instruments in extensive 
performance workshops. Prerequisite: audition. 

Mr. Luca, Ms. Schnoebelen 

327a, 328b. Music Literature for Nonmajors I, II (3-0-3 each seinester). 

Historical survey of music from the Middle Ages to 1 750, first semester; from 1 750 to 
the present, second semester. 

Mr. Bailey 



329. Special Studies-Music History. (3-0-3). 

Special studies in music history. Offered irregularly. 



Staff 



421a. Historical Studies V (3-0-3). 

Twentieth century and contemporary. Historical studies in music of the twentieth 
century. Correlated with Music 41 1 and 431. 

Mr. Bailey 

Ms. Meconi 



422. Renaissance Music (3-0-3). 



423a. Chamber Music Literature (3-0-3). 
Offered irregularly. 



424a, 425b. Organ Literature I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

426a. Piano Literature (3-0-3). 

427a, 428b. Organ Literature III, IV (3-0-3). 

429. Music of the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 
Offered irregularly. 

436a,b. Collegium ( 1 credit). 

521. Graduate Review of Early Music (0 credit). 



523a. Bibliography and Research Methods I (3-0-3). 

Studies in bibliography, techniques in research methodology. 



Staff 
Mr. Holloway 

Staff 
Mr. Holloway 

Ms. Meconi 
Ms. Schnoebelen 

Ms. Citron 



- THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 36 1 

524b. Bibliography and Research Methods II (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Music 523 or permission of instructor. Offered irregularly. 

Ms. Schnoehelen 

525. Performance Practices Seminar (3-0-3). 

Study of performance practices from treatises and music, problems in editing music. 
Offered irregularly. 

Ms. Meconi 

621a,b. Selected Studies in Music History (3-0-3). 

Seminar on individual topics in music history to be announced each year. Prerequisite- 
Music 41 1, 421. 

Staff 

624a,b. Seminar on a Selected Composer (3-0-3 each semester). 
Advanced study of the music of a single composer. 
Prerequisite: Music 4 1 1 , 42 1 . 

Staff 

723. Aesthetics of Music (3-0-3). 

This is an introduction to music aesthetics, focusing on contemporary theories and 
writings. The main issues to be discussed are the creation and perception of musical beauty, 
expression, and meaning. Other topics include: the relationship of the score to the piece; 
listening; musical sense and coherence; and the possibility of objectivity. Readings will be 
drawn from the work of Suzanne Langer and Leonard Meyer, as well as more recent writings 
in phenomenology and semiotics. 

725, 726. Notation I, II (3-0-3 each semester). 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor; Offered irregularly. 

Staff 



Aural Skills 

231a, 232b. Aural Skills and Performance Techniques I, II (3-0-2 each 

semester). 

Ear-training and sight-singing: solfege, rhythmic studies, intervals, chords. Emphasis 
on diatonic music. 

Placement test required prior to enrollment. Aural skills classes must be taken in 
sequence. 

Mr. Lavenda 

331a, 332b. Aural Skills and Performance Techniques III, IV (3-0-2 each 
semester). 
Continuation of Music 232. Emphasis on chromatic music. 

Mr. Lavenda 

431a. Aural Skills and Performance Techniques V (3-0-2). 

Continuation of performance techniques. Literature of the twentieth century. 

Mr. Tipton 

437a. Graduate Ear Training Review (3-0-2). 
Offered irregularly. 



362 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Conducting 

333a,b. Undergraduate Conducting Seminar (4-0- 1 ). 

Mr. Jones 

433b. Score Reading (2-2-2). 

Mr. Jones 

434a. Elements of Conducting (2-0-2). 

Mr. Jones 

439a. Choral Conducting I (3-0-3). 

The fundamentals skills of choral conducting, including baton techniques, score read- 
ing, and rehearsal procedures. Conducting materials will be selected from representative 
choral works. Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

440b. Choral Conducting II (3-0-3). 

Advanced techniques of choral conducting with emphasis on expressive gestures and 
phrasal conducting, interpretation and chironomy of chant, recitative conducting, repertoire 
selection, score preparation, and conducting of choral-instrumental works. Offered 
irregularly. 

Staff 

533a,b. Graduate Conducting Seminar (4-0- 1 ). 

Mr. Jones 

537a, 538b. Advanced Conducting I, II (3-9-3). 

Mr. Jones 

539a. Psychology of Conducting (1-0-1 ). 

Offered irregularly. i 

Mr. Jones 

630a, b. Graduate Choral Conducting Seminar (3-0-3). 

Staff 

637a, 638b. Advanced Conducting III, IV (3-9-3 each semester). 

Mr. Jones 

639b. Orchestra Administration (1-0-1 ). 
Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Jones 

Individual Instruction 

Course numbers for individual instruction are constituted as follows: 
1. The first digit indicates function within the student's curriculum: 1 = 
nonmusic major; 2 = secondary, i.e., study by a music major on an 
instrument other than his or her principal instrument; 3 = concentration, 
i.e., the principal instrument of students majoring in composition, music 
history, theory, or conducting; 4 = music performance major for four-year 
undergraduates and five-year students prior to qualifying exams; 6 = 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 363 

music performance major for two-year graduate students and five-year 
students after qualifying exams. 

2. The second digit indicates the instrumental "family." 

3. The third digit indicates the particular instrument within the family. 

Course numbers for flute are printed in complete format below. The remain- 
der is printed in summary form. 



Woodwind Instruction 

Flute Courses 

151a,b. Flute for Nonmajors ( 1 -5-2). 

251a,b. Secondary Flute ( 1 -5-2). 

351a,b. Concentration Flute ( 1-5-2). 

352a,b. Concentration Flute-Intensive ( 1 -25-3). 



451a,b. Flute for Majors (1-25-3). 

651a,b. Flute for Majors, Advanced, and Graduates ( 1 -25-3). 

Oboe Courses 



Mr. Tipton 
Mr. Tipton 
Mr. Tipton 



153a,b (1-5-2); 253a,b (1-5-2); 353a,b (1-5-2); 354a,b (1-25-3); 453a,b (1-25-3); 
653a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. At her holt 

Clarinet Courses 

155a,b (1-5-2); 255a,b (1-5-2); 355a,b (1-5-2); 356a,b (1-25-3); 455a,b (1-25-3); 
655a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Pickar 

Bassoon Courses 

157a,b (1-5-2); 257a,b (1-5-2); 357a,b (1-5-2); 358b (1-25-3); 457a,b (1-25-3); 
656a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Kamins 

459. Theory of Woodwind Performance Techniques (1-3-1 each semester). 
For non-woodwind students. 

Mr. Pickar 

559a,b. Woodwind Pedagogy ( 1 -3-2 each semester). 
Offered irregularly. 



364 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Brass Instruction 

Horn Courses 

161a,b r 1-5-2; 261a,b (1-5-2); 361a,b (1-5-2); 362a,b (1-25-3); 461a,b (1-25-3); 
661a,b (1-25-33). 

Mr. Bacon, Mr. Caballero 

Trumpet Courses 

163a,b ( 1 -5-2); 263a,b ( 1 -5-2); 363a,b ( 1 -5-2); 364a,b ( 1 -25-3); 463a,b ( 1 -25-33); 
663a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. DeWitt 

Trombone Courses 

165a,b (1-5-2); 265a,b (1-5-2); 365a,b (1-5-2); 366a,b (1-25-3); 465a,b (1-25-3); 
665a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Waters 

Tuba Courses 

167a,b (1-5-2); 267a,b (1-5-2): 367a,b (1-5-2); 368a,b (1-25-3); 467a,b (1-25-3); 
667a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Kirk 

469. Theory of Brass Performance Techniques (1-3-1 each semester). 
For non-brass students. 

Staff 

569a,b. Brass Pedagogy (1-3-2). 

Offered irregularly. 

Percussion Instruction 

Percussion Courses 

171a,b (1-5-2); 271a,b (1-5-2); 371a,b (1-5-2); 372a,b (1-25-3); 471a,b (1-25-3); 
671a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Brown 

479b. Theory of Percussion Performance Techniques (1-3-1 each semester). 
For non-percussion students. Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Brown 

579a,b. Percussion Pedagogy ( 1 -3-2 each semester). 
Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Brown 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 365 

I Voice Instruction 

Voice Courses 

173a,b (1-5-2); 273a,b (1-5-2); 373a,b (1-5-2); 374a,b (1-25-3); 473a,b (1-25-3); 

673a,b (1-25-33). 

Ms. Babikian, Ms. Bible, Ms. Lombard, Ms. Griebling, Ms. Newton 

474a, b. Opera Theater Workshop ( 1 credit). 

Operatic techniques for the singer/actor: the cultivation, through study and perform- 
ance, of free, expressive and significant movement on stage, and the development of musical, 
dramatic and muscular sensitivity as the basis of good opera theater. Participation, accord- 
ing to ability, in scenes recitals and major productions. 

Mr. Addison 



475. Theory of Vocal Performance Technique ( 1 credit). 
For non-voice students. Offered irregularly. 



549a,b. Voice Pedagogy ( 1 -3-2 each semester). 
Offered irregularly. 



571. Vocal Coaching ( 1 credit). 



Staff 



Mr. Connelly 



572a, b. Operatic Role Preparation (3 credits). 

An in-depth study of two or more contrasting roles in which the singer might reasonably 
be cast, now or in the future, and performance of scenes therefrom. 

Prerequisite: two semesters of Opera Workshop. 

Mr. Addision 

573a. Diction I: Italian (2-1-1 ). 

Staff 

574a. Diction II: German (2- 1 - 1 ). 

Staff 

575a, 576b. Voice Repertoire I, II ( 1 -3-2 each semester). 

Ms. Griebling 

577b. Diction III: English (2-1-1 ). 

Staff 

578b. Diction IV: French (2- 1 - 1 ). 

Staff 



Keyboard and Harp Instruction 

Piano Courses 

181a,b (1-5-2); 281a,b (1-5-2); 381 a,b (1-5-2); 382a,b (1-25-3); 481a,b (1-25-3); 

681a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Perry, Mr. Chaisson 



366 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Organ Courses 

183a,b (1-5-2); 283a,b (1-5-2); 383a,b (1-5-2); 384a,b (1-25-3); 483a,b (1-25-3); 
683a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Holloway 

Harpsichord Courses 

185a,b ( 1 -5-2); 285a,b ( 1 -5-2); 385a,b ( 1 -5-2); 386a,b ( 1 -25-3). 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mr. Holloway 

Harp Courses 

187a,b (1-5-2); 287a,b (1-5-2); 387a,b (1-5-2); 388a,b (1-25-3); 487a,b (1-25-3); 
687a,b (1-25-3). 

Ms. Rose, Ms. Page 

445a, 446b. Keyboard Proficiency I, II (2 credits). 
Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Holloway, Staff 

482. Piano Technology (2 crdits). 

An introduction and practicum in the tuning and maintaining of pianos. Among the 
topics to be discussed will be the theory and acoustics of tuning, a brief history of the piano, 
proper repair and replacement of sound producing mechanisms, and a general exposure to 
restoration. There will be hands-on experience and opportunities for supervised involve- 
ment in tuning and maintenance. The course is designed primarily but not exclusively for 
piano majors. 

Mr. Shank 



545a, 546b. Keyboard Proficiency III, IV (2 credits). 
Offered irregularly. 



546a. Organ Pedagogy ( 1 -3-2). 



589a,b. Piano Pedagogy (1-3-2). 
Offered irregularly. 



645b. Organ Construction (2 credits). 
Offered irregularly. 



Mr. Holloway. Staff 
Mr. Holloway 

Mr. Shank 

Mr. Visser 



Violin Courses 



String Instruction 



191a,b (1-5-2); 291a,b (1-5-2); 391a,b (1-5-2); 392a,b (1-25-3); 491a,b (1-25-3); 
691a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Fliegel, Mr. Luca, Ms. Wicks 



THE SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 367 

Viola Courses 

193a,b ( 1 -5-2); 293a,b ( 1 -5-2); 393a,b ( 1 -5-2); 394 a,b ( 1 -25-3); 493a,b ( 1 -25-3); 
693a,b( 1-25-3). 

Mr. Arad, Mr. Brooks 

Violoncello Courses 

195a,b (1-5-2); 295a,b (1-5-2); 395a,b (1-5-2); 396a,b (1-25-3); 495a,b (1-25-3); 
695 a,b (1-25-3). 

Ms. Trepel 

Double Bass Courses 

197a,b (1-5-2); 297a,b (1-5-2); 397a,b (1-5-2); 398a,b (1-25-3); 497a,b (1-25-3); 
697a,b (1-25-3). 

Mr. Ellison, Mr. Malone 



499a. Theory of String Performance Techniques (1-3-1 ). 
For non-string students. Offered irregularly. 



599a,b. String Pedagogy (1-3-2 each semester). 
Offered irregularly. 



Ensembles 

334a,b. Campanile (0-3-1 each semester). 



335a,b. Undergraduate Chorus (0-3- 1 each semester). 

Section 1, Shepherd Singers (by audition only); Section 2, Rice Chorale. 

337a,b. Undergraduate Orchestra (0-9-1 each semester). 



Mr. Fliegel 



Mr. Jones 



Mr. Mayer 



338a,b. Undergraduate Chamber Music (0-6-1 each semester). 

Section 1 , String Quartet; Section 2, Piano; Section 3, Other String Ensembles; Section 
5, Woodwind; Section 6, Brass; Section 7, Percussion; Section 8, Voice; Section 10, Other 
Ensembles. 

435a,b. Contemporary Ensemble. 

531a,b. Orchestral Repertoire (1-3-1 each semester). 

May be repeated. Section 1, Violin; Section 2, Viola; Section 3, Cello; Section 4, Bass; 
Section 5, Woodwinds; Section 6, Brass; Section 7, Percussion; Section 8, Harp. 

635a,b. Advanced Orchestra (0-9- 1 each semester). 

Mr. Mayer 

636a,b. Advanced Chamber Music (0-6- 1 each semester). 

Section 1, String Quartet; Section 2, Piano; Section 3, Other String Ensembles; Section 
5, Woodwind; Section 6, Brass; Section 7, Percussion; Section 8, Voice; Section 10, Other 
Ensembles. 



368 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

640a,b. Advanced Chorus (0-3-1 each semester). 

Section 1, Shepherd Singers (by audition only). Section 2, Rice Chorale. 

736a,b. Solo, Chamber and Concerto Repertoire (3 credits). 

Preparation of a wide range of repertoire as determined by the instructor. 



Courses Applicable to All Specializations 

341a,b. Junior Recital (0-0-0 each semester). 

441a,b. Qualifying Recital (0-0-0 each semester). 

442a,b. Recital Accompanying (0-2-1 each semester). 

Accompanying a single student recital, including the preview, dress rehearsal, perform- 
ance, three lessons with the soloist's teacher, and practice times mutually agreeable to soloist 
and accompanist. May be repeated for additional credit. 

443a,b. Studio Accompanying (0-4- 1 each semester). 

Accompanying private lessons in studios as assigned for a total of four hours per week. 
May be repeated for additional credit. 

449a,b. Undergraduate Independent Study (Credit variable). 

641a,b. Advanced or Senior Recital (0-0-0 each semester). 

642a,b. Accompanying for Ensemble Credit (0-4-1 each semester). 

Requires permission of student's major teacher and conductor of ensemble in which 
student would normally perform. Taken in lieu of Music 635 or 640. Student to fulfill 
requirements of Music 442 or 443. 

647a,b. Master's Thesis in Composition, Theory, History and Literature, or 
Conducting (1-0-3). 

649a,b. Graduate Independent Study (Credit variable). 

741a,b. Graduate Recital (0-0-0 each semester). 

743a,b. Doctoral Seminar - Instrumental Literature (2 credits) 

Directed analysis of selected works in student's current repertoire; additional works as 
specified by instructor. Required of DMA instrumental majors except organists, for four 
semesters. 

745a,b. Instrumental Techniques - Woodwinds ( 1 credit) 

A study of the relationships of the various instruments within a family; technical 
problems to be encountered in the repertoire and resolution of those problems. 

749a,b. Apprenticeship (Credit variable). 

750. Doctoral Document (3 credits). 

Supervised research and writing in areas of performance study. Not limited to areas of 
original research. 

Staff 

75L Doctoral Recital (0 credit). 



NAVAL SCIENCE 369 
800, Dissertation (3 credits). 

Band 

Band Courses 

340a,b. Concert Band (0-4- 1 ). 
By audition. 

Mr. Dye 

342a,b. Jazz Ensemble (0-3-1). 

By audition. 

Mr. Dye 

345a,b. Applied Studies in Jazz Improvisation (Credit variable). 
Private lessons on specific advanced techniques in jazz improvisation. 

415b. Band Arranging (2- 1 - 1 ). 

Creative band arranging for marching, jazz, and concert bands. Study of contemporary 
harmony, musical style, and scoring supported by practical performance and analysis of 
student projects. 

Mr. Dye 

Natural Science 

lOla. Introduction to the Physical Sciences (3-0-3). 

The methods and basic principles of science, with major emphasis on mathematics, 
physics and chemistry. A foundation course. 

Staff 

102b. Introduction to the Physical Sciences (3-0-3). 

The methods and basic principles of science, with major emphasis on mathematics, 
physics and chemistry. A foundation course. 

Staff 

Naval Science 



Professor M. E. Sullivan, Chair 

Associate Professor Locke 

Assistant Professors Sonntag, Morales, and Rachal 

The Department of Naval Science is administered by a senior U.S. naval 
officer, assisted by officers and enlisted personnel of the U.S. Navy and Marine 
Corps. 

There are two categories of NROTC students: (1) scholarship, (2) 
nonscholarship. 

Scholarship Students. A scholarship NROTC student is appointed a midship- 
man, U.S. Naval Reserve, on a nationwide competitive basis and receives retainer 
pay at the rate of $ 100 per month for a maximum of four academic years, with all 



370 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

tuition, fees, books, and equipment paid for by the government. Midshipmen are 
required to complete prescribed naval science courses, participate in drills and 
three summer cruises, and, upon graduation with a baccalaureate or advanced 
degree, to accept a regular commission as ensign in the U.S. Navy or second 
lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. 

Nonscholarship Students. Nonscholarship students are civilian college stu- 
dents who enter into a mutual contract with the Secretary of the Navy in which they 
take naval science courses and participate in drills and one summer training cruise. 
In return, the Navy pays the student $ 1 00 per month during the junior and senior 
years and offers a reserve commission in the Navy or Marine Corps upon gradua- 
tion. Nonscholarship students may, on a local, competitive basis, be recommend- 
ed for scholarship status by the professor of naval science. 

Two- Year Program Students. Interested students may, in their sophomore 
year (junior year for five-year students at Rice), apply for the two-year NROTC 
program. A nationwide competition will initially determine their scholarship or 
nonscholarship status (see above). Following selection, applicants attend a six- 
week Naval Science Institute (NSI) at Newport, Rhode Island, during July and 
August, which is designed to provide students with course material and training 
normally covered during the first two years of the regular NROTC program. 
Successful completion of NSI qualifies the student for enrollment in the advanced 
NROTC on an equal footing with the four-year students. About 1 5 percent of the 
nonscholarship students finishing NSI may be offered a two-year NROTC scholar- 
ship at that time. Additional scholarships may be awarded to the others from time 
to time upon the recommendation of the professor of naval science at Rice. 

U.S. Marine Corps. NROTC students, either scholarship or nonscholarship, 
may apply for the Marine Corps program. Such selectees are referred to as Marine 
Corps option students and attend separate classes under a marine officer instruc- 
tor during their junior and senior years. 



Naval Science 

Naval Science Courses 

101a. Naval Orientation (2-2-0). 

An introduction to naval traditions and customs, seamanship, naval organization and 
missions, and the fundamental concepts of seapower. 

Mr. Sonntag 

102b. Naval Engineering — Naval Ship Systems I (3-2-3). 

A study of ship propulsion systems, refrigeration systems, steering systems, electrical 
power distribution, ship design, ship stability and damage control measures. 

Mr. Morales 

201a. Naval Weapons-Naval Ship Systems II (3-2-2). 

A study of the theory and employment of weapons systems. The student explores the 
processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, delivery, guidance, and 
explosives. The physical aspects of radar and underwater sound are described in detail. 

Mr. Morales 



PHILOSOPHY 371 

202b. Seapower and Maritime Affairs (3-2-2). 

Readings, discussions, and research on selected topics related to the history, impor- 
tance, and impact of seapower on modem civilization. 

Mr. Sullivan 

301a. Navigation (3-2-3). 

A comprehensive study of coastal piloting, celestial and electronic ship navigation; 
involves nautical astronomy, navigational aids, satellite and inertial systems. Requires 
Naval Science 3 1 1 lab. 

Staff 

302b. Naval Operations (3-2-3). 

An analysis of ship movements, formations, and fleet operations; includes Rules of the 
Road, maneuvering board, tactical publications and commuhications. 

Staff 

31 la. Navigation Lab (0). 

Mr. Rachal 

401a. Leadership/Management I (2-0-2). 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of management, organization, leader- 
ship, information systems, and decision making. 

Staff 

402b. Leadership Management II (1-0-1 ). 

A comprehensive study of leadership and management principles, with particular 
emphasis on the practical application of interviewing, counseling techniques, human re- 
sources management, military law and discipline, and organization administration. 

Staff 

410b. Amphibious Warfare (3-2- 1 ). 

A study of the history of amphibious warfare. Case studies examine doctrine, tactics, 
and the factors necessary for successful operations. 

Mr. Sonntag 

In addition to the courses listed above. NROTC students may be required to complete certain 
other courses that are offered by the University. 



Philosophy 



Professors Brody, Engelhardt, Grandy, and Kolenda 

Associate Professor Kulstad, Chair 

Assistant Professors Crowell, Harrison, Morrison, Temkin, and Waters 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The philosophy major requires 30 semester hours 
(ten courses); at least 1 8 semester hours (six courses) must be in the 300 level or 
above. Majors must take Philosophy 201, 202, either 306 or 307, one course in 
logic (either 1 06 or 305), and two further courses in the history of philosophy (30 1 , 
302, 308, 50 1 , or 502). If the student wishes, metaphysics (Philosophy 304), theoi^ 
of knowledge (Philosophy 303), or philosophy of language (Philosophy 353) may 



372 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

be substituted for one of these additional history courses. A double major requires 
27 hours (nine courses) with all other requirements remaining the same. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Completion with high standing of at least 24 semester hours in advanced 
courses approved by the department. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign lan- 
guage or 1 2 additional semester hours in advanced courses approved by 
the department. 

3. Completion of a written thesis on a subject approved by the department. 

4. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination not limited to the 
student's special field of study. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Completion with high standing of 48 hours of course work approved by 
the department (including logic). 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign lan- 
guage. Students whose research interests require a substantial knowledge 
of another discipline can petition to substitute for the language exam an 
examination in that other discipline. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a qualifying examination. 

4. Completion of a written thesis on a subject approved by the department; 
at least one year of thesis research must be spent in residence. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination, not limited to the 
student's special field of study. 



Philosophy Courses 

100a. Problems of Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Survey of traditional and contemporary authors on such topics as the nature of scientif- 
ic knowledge, the theory of justice, and the conflict between determinism and freedom 

Staff 

101a. Contemporary Moral and Legal Issues (3-0-3). 

Examination of the moral and legal issues surrounding such topics as abortion, euthana- 
sia, war, capital punishment, and equality of opportunity. Enrollment limited to 1 50. 

Staff 

102b. Four Perspectives on the Meaning of Life: Existentialism, Marxism, 

Mysticism, Humanism (3-0-3). 

Examination of contrasting orientations toward human life that emerge from the 
contemporary intellectual, social, and political situation. 

Mr. Kolenda 

103a. Philosophy and Psychology (3-0-3). 

Examination of the interrelationship between philosophical and psychological thought. 

Staff 



PHILOSOPHY 373 

104b. Philosophical Perspectives on Science (3-0-3). 

Philosophical issues that arise in and about science; specific theories in both natural and 
social science analyzed to understand the nature and impact of scientific knowledge. 

Mr. Waters 

105a. Historical Introduction to Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Study and discussion of central ideas of Western philosophy as developed by its original 
thinkers. 

Mr. Kolenda 

106a. Logic (3-0-3). 

A system of natural deduction is used to establish the validity of arguments, the validity 
of which turns on their truth functional or quantificational form. 

Ms. Harrison 

201a. History of Philosophy I (3-0-3). 

Survey of major philosophers of the ancient and medieval world from Thales to 
Ockham. 

Mr. Morrison 

202h. History of Philosophy II (3-0-3). 

A survey of the history of philosophy from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. 

Mr. Kulstad 

203b. Thought and Reality (3-0-3). 

A survey of twentieth-century approaches to philosophical issues concerning the nature 
of the world and our knowledge of it. 

Staff 

301a. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Survey of major philosophical writings from the fourth century B.C. through the 
fourteenth. Content varies from year to year. 

Mr. Morrison 

302a. Modern Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Examination of themes or authors in modem philosophy. 

Mr. Kulstad 

303b. Theory of Knowledge (3-0-3). 

Topics: analysis of knowledge, foundations of knowledge, skepticism, perception, etc. 
Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. 

Mr. Waters 

304b. Metaphysics (3-0-3). 

Examination of some classical and contemporary metaphysical systems. Particular 
attention is paid to the very possibility of metaphysical analysis. Prerequisite: one course in 
philosophy. 

Staff 

305a. Mathematical Logic (3-0-3). 

Natural deduction and semantical treatment of first order logic. 
Offered annually except 1988-89. 

Mr. Grandy 

306a. Ethics (3-0-3). 

Philosophical analysis of traditional and contemporary theories of ethics. 

Staff 



374 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

307b. Social and Political Philosophy (3-0-3). 

What makes a society just? On what grounds may the liberty of individuals be legiti- 
mately limited? What social ends may a state legitimately pursue? 

Staff 

308b. Conrinental Philosophy from Kant to Heidegger (3-0-3). 
Selected readings from Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Heidegger. 
Offered alternate years. 

Mr. Crowell 

311b. Philosophy of Religion (3-0-3). 

Examination of God's existence, the problem of evil, the relation between faith and 
reason, and the varieties of religious experience. Offered alternate years. 

Mr. Kolenda 

312a. Philosophy of Mind (3-0-3). 

Inquiry into the nature of mind with emphasis on the mind/body problem. Prerequisite: 
one course in philosophy. 

Ms. Harrison 

313a. Philosophy of Science (3-0-3). 

Study of the relationship between scientific theories, experiment, observation, and 
reality. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. 

Mr. Waters 

314b. Philosophy of Medicine (3-0-3). 

Examination of ethical, epistemological, and ontological questions arising in the prac- 
tice of medicine. 

Staff 

315b. Ethics, Medicine and Public Policy (3-0-3). 

An examination of some of the ethical and policy questions raised by contemporary 
medical techniques and by contemporary modes for the delivery of medical services. 

Not offered in 1988-89. 

Mr. Engelhardt 

316b. Philosophy of Law (3-0-3). 

Examination of social control of private property, compensation in the law of torts, the 
right to privacy and bodily integrity, and justice through compensatory discrimination, etc. 

Mr. Brody 

318b. Philosophy in Literature (3-0-3). 

Study of philosophical themes in selected works in English, French, German, and 
Russian literature. 

Mr. Kolenda 

320a. Space and Time (3-0-3). 

Impact of recent theories on our views of the nature and structure of space and time. 
Offered alternate years. 

Staff 

322b. American Philosophy (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 

Staff 



PHILOSOPHY 375 

353b. Philosophy of Language (3-0-3). 

Philosophical investigation of relations among language, thought, and reality. Prerequi- 
site: two courses in linguistics or philosophy. Also offered as Linguistics 353 

Staff 



357b. Advanced Topics in Mathematical Logic (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



390b. Contemporary Topics (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Philosophy majors or permission of instructor. 
Not offered in 1988-89. 



401a. Independent Reading I (Variable). 
Prerequisite: permission of the department. 



402b. Independent Reading II (Variable). 
See Philosophy 40 1 . 



404b. Honors Research in Philosophy (3-0-3). 
501b. Seminar in Ancient Philosophy (3-0-3). 
502a. Seminar in Modern Philosophy (3-0-3). 



503a. Seminar in Theory of Knowledge (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



504b. Seminar in Metaphysics (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



506b. Seminar in Ethics (3-0-3). 

Offered alternate years. 



507a. Social and Political Philosophy (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



508a. Seminar in Continental Philosophy (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



512b. Seminar in Philosophy of Mind (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 



Mr. Grandy 

Mr. Brody 
Mr. Kulsiad 

Mr. Kulstad 

Staff 

Mr. Morrison 

Mr. Kulstad 

.Mr. Waters 

Staff 

Mr. Temkin 

Staff 

Mr. Crowell 

Ms. Harrison 



376 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

513b. Seminar in Philosophy of Science (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 

Mr. Waters 

515b. Seminar on Wittgenstein (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 

Mr. Kolenda 

521b. Kant and Hegel (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 

Staff 

522a. Pragmatism (3-0-3). 
Offered alternate years. 

Mr. Kolenda 



530a. Frege to Logical Positivism (3-0-3). 
Not offered in 1988-89. 



553b. Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3-0-3). 
Not offered in 1988-89. 



601a. Advanced Independent Reading I (Variable). 
602b. Advanced Independent Reading II (Variable). 
800b,a. Research and Thesis (Variable). 



Mr. Brody 

Mr. Grandy 
Mr. Kulstad 
Mr. Kulstad 
Mr. Kulstad 



Physics 



Professor Bonner, Chair 

Professors S.D. Baker, Clayton, Duck, Dunning, Estle, Hannon, 

Huang, N.F. Lane, Michel, Mutchler, Rau, J.B. Roberts, 

Rorschach, Stebbings, Trammell, and Walters 

Adjunct Professor Hazlewood 

Associate Professors Corcoran, Dodds, and Miettinen 

Adjunct Associate Professor Chang 

Assistant Professors Stevenson and Hulet 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Kimura 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. During the first two years, all physics majors, includ- 
ing those electing one of the four physics options listed below, normally take the 
following required courses: 

Mathematics 101, 1 02, 2 11 , 2 1 2 (or equivalent honors courses) 

Physics 101, 102, 132, 201, 202, 231 



PHYSICS 377 

Chemistry 101, 102, 107 
At the end of the sophomore year each student will be assigned a faculty adviser 
who will be responsible for course registration for the junior and senior years. 
Unless students elect one of the special options given below, seven physics lecture 
courses and four physics laboratory courses at or above the 300 level are required 
during the junior and senior years. These are: 

Physics 301, 302, 311,312 

Physics 331, 332 (Advanced Laboratory) 

Physics 41 1,412, 425 

Physics 43 1 , 432 or 433, 434 (Senior Research) 
Students will select courses in mathematics or mathematical sciences at or 
above the 300 level in consultation with their advisers so that they will complete 
three semesters beyond the two-year introductory sequence. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, all students, 
including those who select one of the options below, must satisfy the distribution 
requirements and complete at least 60 semester hours outside the departmental 
requirements. Regular physics majors normally complete a total program of 1 38 
semester hours. 

Physics majors with a special interest in space physics and astronomy, applied 
physics, biophysics, or geophysics may wish to elect one of the special options 
described below. 

Option in Space Physics and Astronomy. During the first two years, the 
requirements coincide with those for a standard physics major (described above). 
In addition. Space Physics and Astronomy 25 1 , 252, and 262 should ordinarily be 
elected in the sophomore year. The following upper level courses are required: 

Physics 301, 302, 311,312 

Physics 331, 332 (Advanced Laboratory) 

Physics 425 

Space Physics and Astronomy 471 

Space Physics and Astronomy 431, 432 (Senior Research) 

Upper level mathematics or mathematical sciences (two semesters) 
Students selecting this option normally complete a total program of 140 
semester hours. A faculty adviser who is jointly appointed by the physics and the 
space physics and astronomy departments will be assigned to each student. 

Option in Applied Physics. During the first two years, the student normally 
should satisfy the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements listed above 
for a standard physics major. The following additional courses are also required 
for graduation. 

Engineering 241 

Computer Science 2 1 1 

Mathematical Sciences 330, 340 (or equivalents) 

Physics 31 1, 312, 301, 302 (or Electrical Engineering 306) 

Physics 411 or 4 1 2 or Electrical Engineering 46 1 or approved substitute 

Physics 425 

Physics 331, 332, 431,432 
Electrical Engineering 326 or 342 may be substituted for Physics 331 or 332 
with departmental approval. 

Students selecting the applied physics option normally complete a total 
program of 1 39 semester hours. 



378 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Option in Biophysics. During the first two years, the student normally should 
satisfy the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements listed above for a 
standard physics major. The following additional courses are also required for 
graduation: 

Chemistry 211,212,213,214 (should be taken second year) 
Biology 201, 202, 203 
Biochemistry 361, 362 
Physics 301, 302, 311,312 

Students selecting the biophysics option normally complete a total 
program of 1 36 semester hours. 

Option in Geophysics. During the first two years, the student normal- 
ly should satisfy the physics, chemistry, and mathematics requirements 
listed for a standard physics major. The following additional courses are 
also required for graduation: 
Geology 101, 102 
Computer Science 2 1 1 
Physics 301, 302, 311,312 
Mathematical Sciences 340 (or equivalent) 
Physics 43 1 , 432, or 433, 434 (Senior Research) 
Upper level mathematics or mathematical sciences (one semester) 
Two upper level geology or geophysics courses to be selected with approv- 
al of the Physics Department (e.g., Geology 361, 442) 
Students selecting the geophysics option normally complete a total program of 
140 semester hours. 

Chemical Physics Major. An interdepartmental major in chemical physics is 
offered in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry. Students wishing to 
elect this major must obtain approval from both departments. In addition to the 
courses required of a standard physics major during the first two years, the student 
would normally take the following courses: 

Chemistry 211,212,213,214 (should be taken second year) 

Chemistry 31 1,312 

Physics 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 (or equivalents) 

Physics 331, 332 or Chemistry 313, 314 

Physics 301, 302 

Upper level mathematics or mathematical sciences (two semesters) 

Students selecting a chemical physics major normally complete a 
total program of 1 36 semester hours. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Physics offers studies and 
research leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. The Department of Physics offers research facilities and thesis 
supervision in the fields of astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics 
and quantum electronics, biophysics, nuclear and particle physics, con- 
densed matter physics and surface physics, and theoretical physics. 

To be eligible for the Master of Arts degree, a graduate student must 
complete 30 semester hours of approved graduate level studies, including 
a research thesis performed under the direction of a physics faculty 
member. A minimum of one year of graduate study is required for the 
M.A. 

To be eligible for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a graduate 
student must first demonstrate to the department the ability to engage in 



PHYSICS 379 

advanced research. This is normally done by successfully completing the 
work for the Master of Arts in physics. The student must also complete in 
residence 60 semester hours of approved graduate level study, including 
21 semester hours in core courses and a research thesis completed under 
the direction of a physics faculty member. A minimum of two years of 
graduate study is required for the Ph.D. Further details of research 
programs in physics and departmental degree requirements are con- 
tained in a pamphlet Graduate Study in Physics available from the 
Department of Physics on request. 



Physics 

Physics Courses 

101a. Mechanics (3-0-3). 

The first semester of the calculus-based sequence in physics for science and engineering 
students. 

102b. Electricity and Magnetism (3-0-3). 

The second semester of the calculus-based sequence in physics for science and engineer- 
ing students. See Physics 101 and 132. 

121a. Technical Physics I (3-0-3). 

A noncalculus survey of mechanics and thermodynamics, primarily intended for 
architecture and premedical students, with emphasis on problem solving. See Physics 123. 

122b. Technical Physics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Physics 121. Electricity, magnetism, sound, optics, and modem phys- 
ics. See Physics 124. 

123a. Introductory Physics Laboratory I (0-3- 1). 

Recommended for all students enrolled in Physics 121, 122 and 141. 

124b. Introductory Physics Laboratory II (0-3- 1 ). 
See Physics 123. 

132b. Elementary Physics Lab I (0-3- 1 ). 

Recommended for students enrolled in Physics 1 02. 

141a. Concepts in Physics I (3-0-3). 

Emphasis on the nature of physical phenomena, the conceptual development of phys- 
ics, and related cultural influences. See Physics 123,124. 

201a. Waves, Optics and Relativity (3-0-3). 

The third semester of the four-semester sequence in physics for science and engineering 
students. See Physics 231. 

202b. Modern Physics (3-0-3). 

The final semester of the four-semester sequence in physics for science and engineering 
students. 

231a. Elementary Physics Laboratory II (0-3- 1 ). 
Recommended for students enrolled in Physics 20 1 . 



380 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

301a. Intermediate Mechanics (4-0-4). 

Classical mechanics and appropriate mathematical methods. Emphasis on problem 
solving. 

302b. Intermediate Electrodynamics (4-0-4). 

Classical electrodynamics and appropriate mathematical methods. Emphasis on prob- 
lem solving. 

311a. Introductory Quantum Physics I (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of quantum mechanics and applications to atomic and molecular 
structure. 

312b. Introductory Quantum Physics II (3-0-3). 
See Physics 311. 

331a. Junior Physics Laboratory I ( 1 -3-2). 

332b. Junior Physics Laboratory II ( 1 -3-2). 

411a. Nuclear and Particle Physics (3-0-3). 

Foundation course in nuclear and elementary particle physics. 

412b. Solid-state Physics (3-0-3). 

Foundation course in solid-state physics. 

425a. Statistical and Thermal Physics I (3-0-3). 
431a. Senior Physics Research I (0-6-2). 
432b. Senior Physics Research II (0-6-2). 

433a. Honors Research I (0-12-3). 

The student pursues a research project in a similar way to Physics 431, 432 but in 
considerably greater depth. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

434b. Honors Research II (0- 1 2-3). 
See Physics 433. 

461a,b. Independent Research (Variable). 
A reading course in special topics. 

515a. Advanced Classical Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Langrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, normal vibrations, rigid body motion, and 
the transformation theory of dynamics. Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 5 1 5. 

521a. Quantum Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Graduate level quantum mechanics. Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 52 1 . 

522b. Quantum Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Physics 521. Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 522. 

526b. Statistical and Thermal Physics II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Physics 425 intended primarily for first-year graduate students and 
qualified undergraduates. 



PHYSICS 381 

531a. Electromagnetic Theory I (3-0-3). 

Graduate level electricity and magnetism . Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 
531. 

532b. Electromagnetic Theory II (3-0-3). 

Graduate level electrodynamics. Also offered as Space Physics and Astronomy 532. 

541a. Experimental Nuclear Physics (3-0-3). 

Nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. Study of accelerators, detectors, and 
systematics. 

542b. Elementary Particle Physics (3-0-3). 

Theory of elementary particles and characteristic features of experimental data. 

551a. Stellar Interiors (3-0-3). 

See Space Physics and Astronomy 551. 

563a. Introduction to Solid State Physics I (3-0-3). 

Fundamental concepts of crystalline solids, including crystal structure, band theory of 
electrons, and lattice vibration theory. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 
563. 

564b. Introduction to Solid State Physics II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Physics 563, including scattering of waves by crystals, transport theory, 
and magnetic phenomena. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 564. 

571a. Atomic and Molecular Spectra (3-0-3) 

581a. Collision Theory (3-0-3) 

595a,b. Physics Teaching (0-3-3). 

621a. Advanced Quantum Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum electrodyanamics. 

622b. Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3-0-3). 
QED, QCD, and unified theories. 

800a,b. Graduate Research (Variable). 



382 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Policy Studies 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

Undergraduate Program. Students are required to take 12 courses. Three 
introductory social science courses (each from a different discipline, but including 
Economics 211 or 2 1 2) selected from: 

Anthropology 20 1 , 306, Economics 211,212, Political Science 2 1 0, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 
Psychology 101, 102, Sociology 203, 231, 353. 

One course in statistical methods selected from: 

Economics 350, Statistics 280, 382, Political Science 495, Psychology 339, or 
a more advanced course. 

One course in analytical approaches: Social Science 300. 

Three courses in advanced analysis selected from: 

Anthropology 313, 314, 333, 336, Economics 301, 370, 372, 375, 416, 440, 
455, 483, History 350, Philosophy 307, Political Science 317, 318, 337, 
339, 380, 435, Psychology 231, Sociology 301, 31 1, 325, 425. Statistics 
301. 

Three courses in an applied area selected from one of the following groups: 

1. Human Resources/Health/Welfare: Anthropology 381, 383, 386, 388, 
Economics 415, History 430, Philosophy 314, 315, Psychology 332, 
Religious Studies 462, 463, Sociology 313, Social Sciences 420, 430. 

2. Foreign Policy/International Relations: Anthropology 353, 360, Eco- 
nomics 420, 430, 450, History 456, 469, Political Science 351,354, 360, 
361,371,372,378,379. 

3. Law and Justice: Anthropology 326, Economics 438, History 297, 298, 
397, 398, Political Science 321,410, Philosophy 101, Sociology 321. 

4. Quantitative Analysis: Economics 400, 472, Mathematical Sciences/ 
Economics 47 1 , 475, 476, Psychology 340, Sociology 3 1 3, 496. Statistics 
381,480,481. 

5. Urban Studies: Anthropology 348, Economics 46 1 , Political Science 432, 
Sociology 308, 432, 446, 496. 

One approved special topics seminar or one semester of independent work in 
a participating department, involving a research paper on a policy topic. 

In addition to the requirements for the major, students must also satisfy the 
University's distribution and graduation requirements. The policy studies major 
can be taken only as a second major. The first major cannot be also in an 
interdepartmental program. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 383 

Political Science 



Associate Professor Richard J. Stoll, Chair 
Professors J. Ambler, J. Cooper, G. Cuthbertson, R. Dix, and F. von der Mehden 

Visiting Professor Streng 

Associate Professors J. Alford, R. Stein, K. Hamm and R. Wilson 

Assistant Professors K. Bickers, C. Morgan 

Lecturers R. Eubank and C. Hudspeth 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Students majoring in political science are required 
to complete thirty semester hours (ten courses) in the field. All majors must also 
complete six semester hours (two courses) of advanced work, selected with the 
advice of the department, in any of the following fields: anthropology, behavioral 
sciences, economics, history, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. 

Double majors in one of the above fields may automatically substitute six 
semester hours (two courses) in upper level courses in their second field for six of 
the required 30 semester hours in political science courses. Double majors whose 
second major is legal studies, managerial studies, or public policy may automati- 
cally substitute three hours (one course). Double majors whose second field is not 
listed above normally are required to take 30 semester hours (ten courses) in 
political science. They may petition for substitution of courses in other fields, but 
such substitutions are permitted only when the course to be substituted has a close 
and significant relationship to political science. 

Within the major, each student is encouraged to take a program of courses that 
provides both a broad understanding of the field and a specialized knowledge of 
some portion of it. Specific distribution requirements are minimal. However, 
students are required to take at least one course in any four of the six areas listed 
below: 

1. American politics 5. Normative political theory 

2. Comparative government 6. Empirical theory and 

3. Law methodology 

4. International relations 

Political Science 209, 2 1 0, 2 1 1 , and 2 1 2 constitute the introductory courses in 
normative theory, American politics, international relations, and comparative 
government, respectively. Prospective majors are encouraged to take one or more 
of these courses, preferably in their first or second year. However, none is required 
of majors, except that Political Science 2 1 is the course that meets the Texas state 
licensing requirements in political science for teachers. It should be noted that no 
more than three of the above introductory courses may be counted toward the 
major, and that Political Science 310 may not be counted toward the major. 

Two of the political science courses must be seminars (courses at the 400 or 
500 level). A student may not take both seminars from the same faculty member. 
Reading courses will not satisfy this requirement. Students may not normally 
substitute a course in another department to meet this requirement. Students 
participating in the honors program (see below) are only required to take one 
seminar. Note that all courses at the 500 level require the student to obtain the 



384 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

permission of the instructor before registering, and that all seminars have an 
enrollment limit of 20. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Honors Program. Political science majors who qualify may enter an honors 
program. The program consists of (1) a one-semester reading course in the junior 
year (taken either term) which will serve as the basis for drawing up a prospectus 
for the senior essay, plus (2) the writing of the essay, normally in the senior year. 
The nine semester hours required for the major and are counted for purposes of 
distribution in the appropriate area within the major. 

Admission to the honors program occurs, as a rule, in the spring of the 
sophomore year at the time majors are selected. Others may be admitted during the 
junior year. Double majors are eligible for the program. Admission requires the 
approval of the departmental director of undergraduate studies, Mr. Cuthbertson. 

Interdisciplinary Programs. The Department of Political Science participates 
in the inderdepartmental programs in legal studies, managerial studies, and public 
policy. See description of these programs on page 78 for legal studies, 75 and 
346 for managerial studies, and 76 and 382 for public policy. 

Graduate Program, The Department of Political Science offers a graduate 
program leading to the M.A. and the Ph.D. The Ph.D. student is expected to 
complete 48 semester hours in advanced courses or seminars prior to candidacy 
and to present a dissertation displaying original research. Normally, the student 
takes the core courses in the three general fields of American government, compar- 
ative government, and international relations. The student takes additional course 
work and comprehensive examinations in two of these three fields. Before taking 
the comprehensive examinations, the student is expected to complete a course in 
statistical analysis, demonstrate some familiarity with traditional political theory, 
satisfy the language or skill requirement in his or her major field, and complete all 
course requirements, including a two-semester sequence in scope and methods. 
Specific courses are chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser. A limited 
master's program also is offered by the department, consisting of three semesters 
of full-time study. The course work for the master's degree focuses primarily upon 
the student's major field. The third semester is devoted largely to the preparation 
of a thesis. 



Political Science 

Political Science Courses 

209b. Introduction to Constitutionalism and Modern Political Thought (3-0-3). 

Constitutionalism and authoritarianism from Machiavelli to Marx; introduction to 
contemporary ideologies. Together with Poli 210 meets state professional requirements for 
teachers. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 385 

210a. American Government and Politics (3-0-3). 

Major topics in American politics: public opinion, group politics, political parties, 
elections, congressional-presidential-bureaucratic politics, and judicial politics. Together 
with Poli 209 meets state professional requirements for teachers. 

Mr. A I ford 

211b. Introduction To International Relations (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of international relations. The course examines topics 
from the role of individuals to the impact of the international system. Major issues, such as 
the causes of war and development of the third world are also discussed. 

Mr. Stoll 

lllii. Introduction to Comparative Politics (3-0-3). 

An examination of political institutions and behavior in selected democratic, commu- 
nist, and "third world" countries. 

Mr. Ambler 

300 Federalism and Intergovernmental Politics 

Examines the relationships between the Federal government and the States. Lays out 
the effects of national policy on State governments and explores changes in intergovernmen- 
tal aid transfers between levels of government. 

Mr. Bickers 

305a. Directed Reading I (0-0-3). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a member of the department. Open to 
junior majors in the honors program and to others in special cases with the permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

306b. Directed Reading II (3-0-3). 

See Political Science 305. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

309a. Law and Society (3-0-3). 

An examination of the nature of law and of justice; employment of the casebook method 
to study specific aspects of the law. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. 

310b. Law and Society (3-0-3). 

See Political Science 309. Enrollment not limited. 

Mr. Streng 

317b. Congress (3-0-3). 

Examines the role of Congress in the American political system. Attention is given to the 
historical development of Congress, the current status of the Congress, and the functions of 
Congress in the American political system. Enrollment limited to 75. 

Mr. Wilson 

318a. The Presidency (3-0-3). 

Presidential powers and behavior are analyzed in the context of the legal, electoral, 
personal, and other forces that shape and limit the actions of the president. Enrollment 
limited to 75. 

Mr. Bickers 

321a. American Constitutional Law (3-0-3). 

Interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme Court. (Juniors and Seniors pre- 
ferred) Enrollment limited to 50. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 



386 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

330. Electoral Campaigns 

Examines the campaign process in American Politics. Covers issues relating to mass 
political participation, voting, and elite behavior. 

331. Political Parties 

Examines the development and role of political parties in American national politics. 
Includes discussions of elite recruitment, interest groups and elections. 

336b. Politics of Regulation (3-0-3) 

The course will focus principally on government regulation of business and the political 
factors that shape its content. Enrollment limited to 75. 

Mr. Bickers 

337b. Public Policy and Bureaucracy (3-0-3). 

The role public bureaucracy plays in national policy-making process. Sources of agency 
power are examined and then linked to different policy outcomes. Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Stein 

351b. Politics of Southeast Asia (3-0-3). 

Political processes, institutions, and attitudes in selected Southeast Asian states. Em- 
phasis on the postwar period, but traditional forces influencing contemporary political 
behavior also considered. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

353a. Politics of China and Japan (3-0-3). 

Political processes, institutions, and attitudes of China and Japan; emphasis on postwar 
developments in relation to traditional patterns, political ideology, and international polit- 
ics. Offered irregularly. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

354a. Latin American Politics (3-0-3). 

A study of the political process in contemporary Latin America, with particular atten- 
tion to selected major countries. Enrollment limited to 75. 

Mr. Dix 

360a. Western European Democracies (3-0-3). 

A survey of government and politics in Western European democracies, with primary 
emphasis on Great Britain, France, and Germany. Enrollment limited to 75. 

Mr. Ambler 

361b. Comparative Communist Systems (3-0-3). 

A survey of government and politics in selected communist systems, including the 
USSR and Communist China. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Ambler 

372b. The Conduct and Control of American Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

Examines the internal and external aspects of foreign policy leadership, presidential 
initiative, congressional control, press, public opinion, and crisis management. Enrollment 
limited to 75. 

Mr. Morgan 

378a. Politics of American National Security (3-0-3). 

Major issues of national security policy, including strategic doctrines, policy-making 
processes on defense issues, arms control, and conventional war. Enrollment limited to 75. 

Mr. Stoll 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 387 

379a. Problems in International Relations (3-0-3). 

Examines a major issue in international relations and the contributions of the social 
sciences to an understanding and/or solution to that question. 

Mr. Morgan 

380a. Political Behavior (3-0-3). 

Examines basic concepts in political behavior and includes politicization, public opin- 
ion, political participation, and voting behavior. Students will learn basic data analysis 
techniques. Offered irregularly. 

405a. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 

Open to senior honors majors with the permission of the department. Students must 
complete both Political Science 405 and 406 to obtain credit. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

406b. Senior Thesis (3-0-3). 
See Political Science 405. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

410a. Adjudication of Current Social Issues (3-0-3). 

Most political and social questions in America, as Tocqueville observed, ultimately 
become judicial questions. In this course we examine current developments in several fields, 
including basic constitutional issues, property, contracts, torts, crimes, corporate responsi- 
bility and privacy. Enrollment limited to 10 students. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Hudspeth 

415 Research Seminar on History of American Political Institutions. 

Focuses on the use of history as a laboratory for understanding American National 
institutions. Of particular interest is the organization and development of the Legislative 
and Executive Branches. 

430a. Seminar in Texas Politics (3-0-3). 

Research seminar in the history of Texas politics. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequi- 
site: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

431a. Electoral Campaigns (3-0-3). 

Examines the role of campaigns in determining the outcome of political races. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Alford 

432a. Urban Politics (3-0-3). 

Examines issues of political behavior and public policy in urban and metropolitan 
areas. Specific topics include urban decline and revitalization, conflict between "Snowbelt" 
and "Sunbelt" cities, fiscal management, and urban and suburban relations. Enrollment 
limited to 20. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Stein 

433. State Legislatures 

Research seminar examining the similarities and differences of legislatures in the 50 
states. Explores the causes and consequences of these differences. Enrollment limited to 20 
students. 



388 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

435a. Introduction to Political Analysis (3-0-3). 

This course is intended as an introduction to quantitative political analysis for incom- 
ing graduate students and senior undergraduates considering graduate study in political 
science. Enrollment limited to 20. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Alford 

436. Urban Management 

Focuses on issues of urban administration. Explores questions pertaining to service 
delivery, centralization and decentralization and types of urban political organization. 
Enrollment limited to 20 students. 

439. Research Seminar on Southern Politics 

Focuses on political behavior and political institutions in Southern States. Of special 
interest is contemporary Texas politics. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 

454a. Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements (3-0-3). 

Causes and outcomes of revolutions, both past and contemporary, and their relation- 
ships to the societies in which they occur. 

Mr. Dix 

457a. Conditions of Democracy (3-0-3). 

An examination of why some countries are democratic and others not, with particular 
emphasis on the breakdown and restoration of democracy in Latin America and Southern 
Europe. Enrollment limited to 20. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Dix 

460a. Seminar in Comparative Government (3-0-3). 

This seminar will analyze non-economic factors influencing development in Asia. 
Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

462b. Comparative Public Policy (3-0-3). 

This seminar will examine the process and substance of public policy across nations, 
with a primary focus upon Western democracies. Attention will be given to such policy areas 
as education, health, economic policy, and defense. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Ambler 

465b. Inter-American Relations (3-0-3). 

This seminar will examine relations between the United States and the countries of 
Latin America, with particular emphasis on the efforts of the U.S. to promote or inhibit 
political change, including revolutionary change in Latin America. Enrollment limited to 20. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Dix 

466b. Political Parties and Voting Behavior in Western Democracies(3-0-3). 

This seminar will deal with the determinants of party systems, the structure and 
functions of parties, and theories of voting behavior in Western democracies. 

Mr. .Ambler 

470b. Research Seminar in International Relations (3-0-3). 

Conflict modeling and quantitative analysis of alliance formation, foreign aid, regime 
structures, ideologies, and arms races as they affect the probability of war. Enrollment 
limited to 20. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Morgan 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 389 

471a. Seminar on Current U.S. Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

The seminar will address issues in the ^rmulation, administration, and conduct of U.S. 
foreign policy. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 1 5 students. Not 
offered next year. 

472a. American Foreign Policy (3-0-3). 

The content of American foreign policy, its sources, and the process of policy formula- 
tion. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Not offered next 
year. 

Mr. Morgan 

473b. Seminar on Current U.S. Domestic Policy (3-0-3). 

The seminar will address issues in U.S. domestic politics and policy, such as political 
action committees; U.S. trade policy and pending legislation; farm policy and the Congress. 
Enrollment limited to 1 5. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Not offered next year. 

474a. Collective Social Choice (3-0-3). 

The objective of this course is to introduce students to a growing body of literature on 
how and why individual preferences dominate those of others; and the relationship between 
decision making structures and the nature of decisional outcomes. Enrollment limited to 20. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Wilson 

490b. Modern Political Theory and Interdisciplinary Fields (3-0-3). 

The development of political fiction, the political novel as political theory, and the 
relevance of the political novel to contemporary problems. Enrollment limited to 20. Not 
offered next year. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 

495a. Introduction to Statistics (3-0-3). 

This course aims at providing students with a working knowledge of statistics in 
political science. It involves the study of descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as 
hands-on experience with computer statistical packages. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequi- 
site: permission of instructor 

Mr. Wilson 

498. Committees in Congress (3-0-3). 

This seminar will examine the role that committees play in a legislative setting. The 
seminar will focus on the structural role of the committees, their agenda setting functions, 
their role in policy formation and their relation with Congress as a whole. Enrollment limited 
to 20. Permission of instructor required. 

Mr. Wilson 

503b. Special Topics in Research Methods and Data Analysis (3-0-3) 
Applications of least squares and general linear model. Offered irregularly. 

505. Simulation and Political Decision Making (3-0-3). 

The topic for this seminar will be the use of computer simulation as a tool for 
understanding the process of decision making in various political contexts. Working knowl- 
edge of a higher level computer language is desirable. Permission of instructor required. 
Offered irregularly. 

Mr Stoll 

510b. Scope and Methods (3-0-3). 

Introduction to research in political science, problems of the discipline, and basic 
political concepts. History of political science as a discipline. Offered irregularly. 

Mr. Cooper 



390 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

511b. Measurement and Research Design (3-0-3). 

Research design. Measurement theory. Data collection and modes of analysis. Use of 
the computer in political research. Theory building. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Alford 

520a. Approaches to Comparative Government (3-0-3). 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to the study of comparative govern- 
ment. Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. Not offered next year. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

527b. Organization Theory (3-0-3). 

Examination of applications of organization theory to the study of American political 
institutions. Not offered next year. 

Mr. Cooper, Mr. Wilson 

530b. Approaches to American Government (3-0-3). 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to the study of American politics. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Mr. Alford 

531. State Politics 

Examines similarities and differences in the organization of state politics. Major issues 
include state legislative organization, state elite behavior, and policy implementation. 

535. Voting and Political Behavior 

Research seminar that examines issues of elite and mass political participation. Surveys 
traditional literature in the field and focuses on special topics. 

537a. Public Policy/Public Administration (3-0-3). 

The administration and implementation of public policies across federal, state, and 
substate governments. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Also offered as Administra- 
tion 563. 

Mr. Stein/Mr. Bickers 

540b. International Relations (3-0-3). 

Core graduate course analyzing basic approaches to the study of international relations. 
Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. 

Mr. Morgan 

571b. Political Risk Analysis (3-0-3). 

Analyses of political and social factors affecting business operations abroad, including 
domestic instability, foreign conflict, corruption, nationalization, indigenization, etc. A 
simulation exercise is required. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Also offered as 
Administration 571. 

Mr. von der Mehden 

580a. American Politics (3-0-3). 

Reading and original research on selected topics in American Politics. Enrollment 
limited. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mr. .41 ford 

581b. Congress — Organization (3-0-3). 

Examines the linkages between the United States Congress, its environment, and its 
policy outputs. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered irregularly. 

591a. Directed Reading — Methodology (3-0-3). 

Mr. Wilson 



PSYCHOLOGY 391 

592b, Methodology and Research Design (3-0-3). 
593a. Directed Reading — American Politics (3-0-3). 
594b. Directed Reading — American Politics (3-0-3). 

595a. Directed Reading in International Relations(3-0-3). 

Mr. Stoll 

596b. Directed Readings — International Relations(3-0-3). 

597a. Directed Readings — Comparative Politics( 3-0-3). 

Mr. von der Mehden 

598b. Directed Readings — Comparative Politics(3-0-3). 

600a,b. Topics in Political Science (Variable). 
Research and thesis for resident students. 

800b,a. Ph.D. Research and Thesis (Variable). 

Psychology 



Professor Laughery, Chair 

Professors Brelsford, Dipboye, Howell, Pomerantz, 

Roediger, R.N. Taylor, Toggle, and Watkins 

Adjunct Professors Overall, Wright 

Associate Professors Burnett, D.M. Lane, R. C. Martin 

Assistant Professors Cooke, Gaugler, Martell, and W.R. Wilson 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Burnside, Loveland, Gillan, Goldsberry, 

Montgomery, and Wunder 

Adjunct Instructors: Diddel, and Laux 

Research Associates Sechler and Wetzel 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Twenty-nine semester hours are required for a major 
in psychology. The following courses are required for the major in psychology: 
Psychology 101, 202, 203, 339, and 340. There maybe no substitution or transfer 
credit for 339 or 340. In addition to the five required courses listed above, the 
student must take at least one course from each of the following blocks of courses: 

Block 1: Psychology 308, 309, 351, 362 

Block 2: Psychology 330, 332, 372 

An honors program is available that requires completion of the major require- 
ments listed above, an honors thesis, and other requirements as determined by the 
student's honors committee. Candidates for the honors program must submit an 
application. A decision to admit a student will be made by vote of the faculty. 



392 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Graduate Program. Graduate programs are offered at both the M. A. and Ph.D. 
levels. The emphasis, however, is upon doctoral training, and only applicants of 
Ph.D. caliber are admitted. 

A research thesis with public oral defense is required for both M. A. and Ph.D. 
degrees. In addition. 60 semester hours must be accumulated for the Ph.D. and 30 
for the M.A. Included in this total are required courses in the areas of memory, 
cognition, engineering and industrial/organizational psychology, social psycholo- 
gy, and methodology, plus whatever offerings are available in the student's special- 
ty area. The three specialty areas currently offered are cognitive-experimental, 
industrial-organizational/social, and engineering psychology. 

Competence in a foreign language is not required. The student must, however, 
pass an admission-to-candidacy procedure designed to establish his or her exper- 
tise in the chosen specialty area. 



Psychology' Courses 

1 1 a,b. Introduction to Psychology ( 3-0- 3 ) . 

Overview of current research and theory in a variety of subareas of psychology. 

Mr. Brelsford. Mr. Howell 

202a. Introduction Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the major theories and supporting research in social psychology. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

Mr. Dipboye 

203b. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to topics in cognitive psychology including perception, memory, 
psycholinguistics, problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

Ms. Cooke 

221a. Developmental Psychology (3-0-3). 

Focus on behavioral changes with age and general laws of development in both human 
and nonhuman species. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

Mr. Lane 

231b. Industrial and Organizational Psychology(3-0-3). 

An overview of the pnnciples, techniques, and theories of psychology applied in the 
industrial setting. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, Mathematical Sciences 280. 

AIs. Gaugler, Mr. Dipboye 

308a. Memory (3-0-3). 

Critical review of traditional and contemporary approaches to the study of remember- 
ing and forgetting. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 203 or permission of instructor. Limit 50. 

Mr. Wat kins 



PSYCHOLOGY 393 

309a. Psychology of Language (3-0-3). 

Human and other animal communication, structure of human language, word meaning 
and semantic memory, psychological studies of syntax, biiingualism, language and thought, 
language errors and disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 203 or permission of instructor. 
Limit 50. Offered alternate years. Also offered as Linguistics 309. 

Ms. Martin 

330b. Personality Theory (3-0-3). 

Consideration of those aspects of personality emphasized by the major theorists past 
and present. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 202. Limit 50. Offered alternate years. 

Staff 

332b. Abnormal Behavior (3-0-3). 

Reactions to stress, neurotic traits, therapy, depression, and schizophrenia. The course 
presents an eclectic, empirically-based exploration of the subject of abnormal psychology 
and explores topics and theories in the light of research findings. Prerequisite: Psychology 
101, 202 or permission of instructor. Limit 50. 

Ms. Burnett 

339a. Statistical Methods— Psychology (3- 1 -4). 

Introduction to quantitative and computer methods applicable to the analysis of 
experimental data. Prerequisite: 101 or permission of instructor. Limit 50. 

Staff 

340b. Research Methods (3-1-4). 

A continuation of Psychology 339 with a strong emphasis on individual student 
experiments and the writing of research reports. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 339. Limit 50. 

Mr. Watkins/Mr. Mar tell 

351a. The Psychology of Perception (3-0-3). 

An overview of the sensory and cognitive processes involved in human vision and 
audition. Prerequisites: Psychology 101. 203 or permission of instructor. Offered alternate 
years. 

Ms. Martin. 

362b. Physiological Psychology (3-0-3). 

An overview of the neurophysiological correlates of behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 
101. 

Staff 

372b. Advanced Social Psychology (3-0-3) 

Theories and research in social psychology with an in-depth treatment of selected 
topics. 

Mr. Schneider 

429a. Tests and Measurement (3-0-3). 

Techniques for measuring individual differences and critical review of theories of 
individual differences in intelligence and personality. Limit 50. Prerequisite: Psychology 
101, 339 and permission of instructor. 

Ms. Gaugler 



431b,a. Advanced Topics — Social Psychology (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



Staff 



433a,b. Advanced Topics in Cognitive Psychology(3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Cooki 



394 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



435a,b. Advanced Topics in I/O Psychology (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



437b. Advanced Topics — General Psychology (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



439a,b. Advanced Topics in Psychopathology (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



Ms. Gaugler 



Mr. Brelsford 



Ms. Burnett 



442b. Computer Applications (3-0-3). 

Use of small computers in psychological research. Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Limit 10. 

Mr. Lane 

450a. Animal Behavior Methods (3-0-3). 

Lecture, discussion, and laboratory course in learning and behavioral control. Theoreti- 
cal issues and applications in classical conditioning, instrumental, stimulus control, and 
aversive control. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Limit 5. 

Mr. Wright 

470b. Engineering Psychology (3-0-3). 

Principles of psychology and human performance applied to the design of modem 
systems. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 203 or permission of instructor. Limit 50. 

Mr. Brelsford 

491a,b. Independent Study and Research (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mr. Howell. Mr. Brelsford 

499b,a. Senior Thesis (Variable). 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 339, 340 and permission of instructor. 

Mr. Watkins, Ms. Burnett 

509a. Advanced Psychological Statistics (3-0-3). 

Descriptive and mferential statistics for beginning graduate students in psychology. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Martin 

510b. Advanced Psychological Statistics (3-0-3). 

Descriptive and mferential statistics for beginning graduate students in psychology. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Staff 

Mr. Martell 
Mr. Dipboye 



512a. Advanced Social Psychology: Croup Processes(2-0-2). 

513a. Advanced Social Psychology: Cognitive Processes(2-0-2). 

514a. Topics in Quantitative Methods (3-0-3) 

515a. Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 



Mr. Lane 



Ms. Martin 



516b. Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3-0-3). 

517b. Topics in Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

518a. Foundations of I/O Psychology (2-0-2). 

519a. Foundations — Engineering Psychology (2-0-2). 

520b. Engineering Psychology (3-0-3). 

521a. Advanced Learning and Memory (2-0-2). 

522a. Advanced Cognition (2-0-2). 

531b. Survey of I/O Psychology (3-0-3). 

532b. Readings in I/O Psychology (3-0-3). 

533b. Personnel Psychology (3-0-3). 

535a. Topics in Engineering Psychology 

543a,b. Advanced Research Seminar ( 1 -0- 1 ). 

544a. Organizational Psychology (3-0-3). 



PSYCHOLOGY 395 

Mr. Watkins 

Mr. Martell 

Ms. Gaugler 

Mr. Laughery 

Mr. Laughery, Mr. Brelsford 

Ms. Burnett 

Ms. Cooke 

Mr. Dipboye 

Mr. Dipboye 

Ms. Gaugler 

Mr. Lane/Ms. Cooke 

Mr. Watkins 



547b. Psychology Presentations (2-0-2). 

A practicum in oral and written psychology presentations. 



551a,b. Non-Thesis Graduate Research (Variable). 
553a,b. Graduate Teaching in Psychology (3-0-3). 
554a. First- Year Graduate Paper (3-0-3). 
555a,b. Second- Year Graduate Research (Variable). 



Mr. Howell 

Mr. Watkins 

Mr. Watkins 

Mr. Watkins 

Ms. Burnett 

Mr. Laughery. Mr. Watkins 



396 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

561a,b. Industrial-Organizational Internship( Variable). 

Mr. Dipboye, Ms. Gaugler 

563a,b. Engineering Psychology Internship (Variable). 

Mr. Laughery 

800a,b. Thesis Research (Variable). 

Mr. Howell 

Religious Studies 



Professor Nielsen, Chair 
Professors Kelber, Rupp, and Sellers 

Adjunct Professor Reiser 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Sanborn 

Lecturers Benjamin, Dunne, T.F. Freeman, and Karff 

Adjunct Lecturer Heitman 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. All undergraduates majoring in religious studies are 
expected to enroll in one of the introductory courses offered at the first-or second- 
year level. A total of 24 semester hours (eight courses) in advanced courses are 
required for completion of the major. At least six semester hours (two courses) are 
to be elected in each of the following areas represented in the Department: 

1. Historic and Biblical studies 

2. Interpretation, theology, comparative religions 

3. Religion in the modern world 

Qualified upperclass students are given an opportunity to engage in indepen- 
dent work. Related courses offered by other departments may be taken for credit in 
religious studies with the approval of the major adviser. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Religious Studies offers graduate work 
in a variety of fields: Judeo-Christian origins, church history, philosophy of 
religion (including theology), and ethics. In keeping with the traditions of Rice 
University, study and research are not confessionally oriented. The awarding of 
advanced degrees is not based solely on the accumulation of credits or compliance 
with formal requirements. Course plans are determined according to the prepara- 
tion, needs, and interests of the candidate. A capacity for independent work is 
considered essential to study in the department. 

Cooperative Graduate Study in Medical Ethics. Under an agreement with the 
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, a cooperative program of 
graduate study in medical ethics is offered, leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees 
from Rice University. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 397 

Clinical experience and case studies are provided through the Health Science 
Center's Program in Humanities and Technology in Medicine. Central to the 
cooperative plan is the interdisciplinary seminar in medical ethics (two semesters), 
with students and instructors from both institutions. Thus students from the 
Department of Religious Studies have the opportunity to work with students from 
such disciplines as medicine, nursing, and public health. 

Library resources of the Health Science Center are open to Rice graduate 
students in medical ethics. 

Fellowship in Religious Studies for Study Abroad. A fellowship has been 
established to encourage advanced students to spend a year in another university, 
in most cases after they have completed their comprehensive qualifying examina- 
tions for the Ph.D. degree. It is available equally to persons in any field of study 
offered in the department. The recipient is chosen by faculty members responsible 
for graduate work. The cost of air travel is paid in addition to a monthly stipend. 
Additional costs, such as tuition for study at particular institutes, are considered 
on a case-to-case basis. Award is made annually, subject to availability of funds. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the depart- 
ment; normally, this includes 24 semester hours in advanced courses plus 
thesis work. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in French or 
German. 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations 
in the field of religious studies; normally, these include biblical studies, 
church history, philosophy of religion (including theology), and ethics, 
with detailed attention to the area of thesis specialization. 

4. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the depart- 
ment; normally, this includes 54 semester hours of course work, counting 
those given for the degree of Master of Arts. Six of these semester hours 
may be waived upon petition to the graduate faculty after the first year. 
Normal minimum residence is at least two years, even for candidates 
already holding advanced degrees. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in both French and 
German. 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations 
in religious studies. Candidates for the doctoral degree are expected to 
prepare themselves for six qualifying examinations, four of which are to 
cover the basic areas of biblical studies, church history, philosophy of 
religion (including theology), and ethics; the other two are to be taken in 
the major area of concentration. 

4. Completion of a formal proposal and dissertation, both to be approved by 
the department. 

5. Satisfactory performance of a final oral examination on the dissertation 
and related fields. 



398 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Religious Studies Courses 

Ilia. Religion and Culture (3-0-3). 

Examination of major traditions of the East and West. Religion in human experience: 
personal, historical, cultural, and theological dimensions. 

Mr. Nielsen 

1 12b. Religion and Culture (3-0-3). 

Religious alternatives. The secular versus the sacred. Competing world views. East and 
West. Enrollment limited. 

Ms. Dunne 

202b. Atheism (3-0-3). 

Readings in Marx, Feuerbach, Nietzsche, Sartre, Bloch, as well as classical theistic 
arguments. 

Mr. Schubert 

203a. Radical Revolutionaries of Thought (3-0-3). 

Study of the founders of the great religions as well as contemporary thinkers. 

Mr. Schubert 

204b. Deit>, Mysticism, and the Occult (3-0-3). 

Critical, phenomenological study of the psychology of religion and the occult. Compar- 
ative use of the categories of the Western and Eastern traditions. 

205a. Archaeology and the Bible (3-0-3). 

The Bible-on-location with slides from excavations in Jordan, Israel, Sinai & Cyprus. 
The Bible story alongside stories which architecture, pottery, metalwork, sculpture, tombs, 
painting & other arts in Biblical lands tell. 

Mr. Benjamin 

301a. Mysticism and Existentialism (3-0-3). 

Examination of these two approaches to life in Christian and non-Christian literature, 
ancient and modern. 

Ms. Dunne 

302b. Jewish-Christian Dialogue (3-0-3). 

Discussion of the basic questions which appear in interfaith exchange. Jewish and 
Christian beliefs about God, man, history, evil and eschatology. 

Mr. Karff, Mr. Nelson, Mr. Schubert 

303a. Monotheistic Religions: (3-0-3). 

Lectures on the major monotheistic religions. Discussion of early, medieval, modern 
and post-modern paradigms in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and the tensions between 
them. 

Mr. Nielsen 

304b. Modern Jewish Thought (3-0-3) 

Readings in contemporary Jewish thought with attention to Borowitz, Buber, Kaplan, 
and Rosenzweig. Not offered 1988-89. 

305a. Introduction to Judaism (3-0-3) 

Study of Biblical monotheism, Talmud, Jewish philosophy, mysticism, and contempo- 
rary reinterpretation. Not offered 1988-89. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 399 

306b. The Modern Jew: Despair versus Happiness (3-0-3) 

Examination of the meaning of the Holocaust for Jews and Christians through litera- 
ture, art, poetry, and other memoirs. Prerequisite: Reli 111, 1 1 2, or other approved course. 
Not offered 1988-89. 

307a. Christian Origins (3-0-3). 

Early Christianity in the context of Jewish, Hellenistic and Roman civilizations. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

308b. Synoptic Gospels (3-0-3) 

A reading of the gospel stories from a literary perspective. 

310b. Pauline Correspondence (3-0-3). 

The thought of Paul in conflict with alternate traditions. Not offered 1 988-89, 1 989-90. 

Mr. Kelber 

31 la. History of Religion (3-0-3). 

Readings m the religious texts of India, China, and Japan. Study of Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Confusianism, and Taoism. 

312b. History of Religion (3-0-3). 

Study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in their historical development. Attention to 
the basic themes of Western theism. Enrollment limited. 

Ms. Dunne 

314b. Introduction to Islam (3-0-3). 

Study of the history and traditions of the religion founded by Mohammed, Koran, Sufi 
mysticism and the influence of Islam in the West. 

319a. Builders of the American Religious Traditions (3-0-3). 

Course probes the history of religion in North America through the biographies of 
representative figures. Not offered 1988-89. 

321a. Seminar on a Contemporary Theologian: C.S. Lewis(3-0-3). 

Study and critical evaluation of the writings of a contemporary religious thinker. Lewis' 
outlook compared with that of Thomas Merton and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. 

Mr. Schubert 

331a. Psychology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Study of the primary developments in the field, with particular emphasis on changing 
issues and methods. Enrollment limited. 

Ms. Dunne 

334b. Psychology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Significant contemporary problems examined from a clinical standpoint, e.g., ideas of 
God, evil, anxiety, guilt, and therapeutic process. 

Mr. Sanborn 

341a. Human Rights and Dignity I (3-0-3). 

An exploration of questions raised by contemporary phenomena such as terrorism, 
torture, and totalitarianism. 

342b. Human Rights and Human Dignity II (3-0-3). 

A study of specific violations of human rights in contemporary society. Students may 
choose area of special interest. Not offered 1988-89. 



400 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

345a. Ethics and Life Cycle I (3-0-3). 

Concrete problems of the life "spiral," including the quest for identity, sex ethics, 
medical ethics, aging, death and dying. 

Ms. Heitman 

346b. Ethics and Life Cycle II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Reli 345. Not offered 1988-89. 

347a. Varieties of Contemporary Religion (3-0-3). 

Varying religious life styles, traditional and nontraditional, in the Indian, Black, 
Mexican-American, Islamic, and Jewish communities. Consideration of worship, sacred 
literature, ethics, community involvement, evangelical efforts. Field trips, guests, 
discussion. 

Mr. Freeman 

348b, Community Ethical Dilemmas (3-0-3). 

Current community problems and their ethical and religious implications: drugs, race, 
inequities, poverty, law enforcement, religious intolerance. Guest speakers, visitations. 

Mr. Freeman 

357a. Women in the Bible (3-0-3). 

Teaching literature in Ancient Israel. Clan-mothers and queens, warriors, wives, and 
lovers in Proverbs, Qoheleth, Job, Psalms, Song of Songs, Ruth, Judith, Esther. 

Mr. Benjamin 

358b. Bible, Creation, and Apocalypse (3-0-3). 

Alpha and Omega stories in Ancient Israel: The Garden of Eden, the Flood, the Exodus, 
the Battle of Jericho, Isaiah's Messiah, EzekieFs New Jerusalem, Daniel, Zechariah, Jonah. 

Mr. Benjamin 

375a. Man in the Cosmos (3-0-3). 

Fundamental questions on the nature of humanity and its place in the universe. 

376b. Origin of the Universe (3-0-3). 

Major cosmological theories and their effect on both religious and secular thinking. 

401a. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Mr. Nielsen 

402b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Mr. Nielsen 

415b. Contemporary Moral Problems (3-0-3). 

Discussion of controversial moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punish- 
ment, war, and the role of the state. 

Ms. Heitman 

445a. Tutorial in Contemporary Moral Probelsm (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89. 

453a. History of Christianity I (3-0-3). 

Survey from Christian beginnings to Renaissance. Not offered 1988-89. 

454b. History of Christianity II (3-0-3). 

Survey from the Reformation to the seventeenth century. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 401 

462a. Medical Ethics and American Values I (3-0-3). 

Readings and discussion of the principles and priorities of medical ethics, with atten- 
tion to historical development. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Ms. Heitman, Mr. Reiser 

463b. Medical Ethics and American Values II (3-0-3). 

Continuation of 462, with attention to clinical experience. Prerequisite: Religion 462. 

Ms. Heitrrian, Mr. Reiser 

501a. Reformation: Zwingli — Anabaptists (3-0-3). 

502b. Reformation: English (3-0-3). 

506a. Gospel and Tradition (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89. 

507a. Pauline Theology (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89, 1989-90. 

508b. John and Logocentrism (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89. 

509b. Biblical Hermeneutics from Augustine to Derrida (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89, 1989-90. 

511a. Seminar in Hebrew Religion I (3-0-3). 

Mr. Benjamin 

512b. Hebrew Religion II (3-0-3). 

Mr. Benjamin 

521b. Non-Christian Religious Philosophies (3-0-3). 

Critical examination of major traditions of Indian and Chinese philosophy, historical 
development and modern expressions of Hindu and Buddhist thought. 

Mr. Nielsen 

523a. Independent Study (Variable). 

Mr. Nielsen 

524b. Independent Study (Variable). 

Mr. Nielsen 

525a. Theoretical Principles of Interreligious Dialogue (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89. 



526a. Seminar — Contemporary Theology (3-0-3). 
528b. Ecumenical Theology Seminar (3-0-3). 



533a. Seminar in Historical Theology (3-0-3). 
Not offered 1988-89. 

541a. Seminar in Ethics (3-0-3). 



Mr. Nielsen 
Mr. Nielsen 

Mr. Sellers 



402 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



542b. Seminar in Ethics and Society (3-0-3). 



§43a. Seminar in Medical Ethics and American Values( 3-0-3). 

Ms. Heitman, Mr. Reiser 



544b. Medical Ethics and American Values II (3-0-3). 
Prerequisite: Religion 543. 



Mr. Reiser, Ms. Heitman 



545a. Advanced Tutorial in Medical Ethics (3-0-3). 

Tutorial studies for graduate students in health care ethics who have completed the 
required first year semester. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Sellers 

553a. Departmental Colloquium (3-0-3). 

554b. Departmental Colloquium (3-0-3). 

800a,b. Thesis Research (Variable). 

Mr. Nielsen 

Social Sciences 



The School of Social Sciences offers majors in anthropology, behavioral 
science, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. 

The requirements for the interdepartmental major in policy studies, which 
overlaps the School of Social Sciences and the School of Humanities, is outlined on 
page 382. The requirements for the managerial studies major, which overlaps the 
School of Social Sciences, the Jones School, and the School of Engineering, is 
described on page 346. 

Social Science Courses 

102b. Intellectual Traditions of the Social Sciences (3-0-3). 

A survey of foundational ideas, concepts and analytical methods that have shaped the 
intellectual heritage of the social sciences. A foundation course. 

Mr. Ambler, Mr. Bickers. Mr. Davidson, Mr. Rimlinger, Mr. Smith 

300. Social Science Approaches to Policy (3-0-3). 

The course will survey how disciplines in the social sciences study public policy. Specific 
policy questions will be examined as a means of highlighting each discipline's approach to the 
study of public policy. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Stein 

420b. Health Care: Choice & Public Policy (3-0-3). 

Explores the generation of technology from science, its transformation by engineering 
intervention into workable innovations, and processes and problems of evaluating benefits 
and limits before it diffuses into clinical practice. 

Mr. Reiser 



SOCIOLOGY 403 

430a. The Shaping of Health Policy (3-0-3). 

As health care becomes an important institution of the private and public sector, an 
understanding of how policy decisions are made and implemented become essential. This 
course brings together the disciplines of government, law, ethics, economics, and history to 
explore health care policy. Seminars will involve faculty experts in the above disciplines, and 
guests who are leading national figures in the shaping of public policy to present case 
discussions of major policy problems. 

Mr. Reiser 



Sociology 



Professor Davidson, Chair 

Professors C. Gordon, Klineberg, and W. C. Martin 

Associate Professor Long 

Adjunct Professor D. P. Smith 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

Undergraduate Program. The major is designed to enable students to under- 
stand the nature of human societies as an important part of a liberal education, as a 
foundation for a variety of occupations, and as preparation for graduate study. The 
program provides students with considerable latitude in pursuing substantive 
interests, while ensuring a basic familiarity with theoretical approaches and issues 
of methodology. Majors in sociology are not required to take a foreign language; 
those planning graduate study, however, should be aware that many graduate 
departments of sociology require demonstrated competence in at least one foreign 
language. A minimum of 27 semester hours (nine courses) in sociology must be 
passed, of which at least 2 1 semester hours (seven courses) must be at the advanced 
level. In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete at least 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 1 20 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Requirements for the major in sociology are: ( 1 ) Sociology 203; (2) at least one 
of the two courses emphasizing theoretical approaches, Sociology 3 1 7 or 353; (3) 
Sociology 42 1 ; and (4) at least 1 8 semester hours (six courses) in the substantive 
areas of sociological specialization. A statistics course such as Mathematical 
Sciences 280, 30 1 , 38 1 , 480, or 48 1 or an independent study course (Sociology 403, 
404, 493, 494) may be used as one of these. 

All sociology courses listed are regularly offered by the present faculty, al- 
though not necessarily every year. Additional courses may be offered with the 
addition of new faculty or variations in present course assignments; similarly, 
some courses may be discontinued from the regular offerings. It is the responsibili- 
ty of the student to consult the listing of University distribution requirements 
before registering in order to satisfy all the requirements for his or her degree. The 
registration of every sociology major must be signed by the departmental adviser. 
Professor Klineberg. 

Honors Program. The honors program is designed to ( 1 ) provide undergradu- 
ates whose primary concentration is in the field of sociology with the opportunity 
to deepen their understanding of the sociological perspective through a two- 



404 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

semester program of directed independent research and writing, and (2) provide 
an opportunity for the recognition of undergraduates who have demonstrated 
unusual competence in sociology and capacity for sustained independent research. 

To be eligible for the program, a student must have maintained a "B" average 
in at least four sociology courses beyond the introductory level. During the first 
semester of the junior year, students who meet this requirement are invited to 
submit, no later than two weeks prior to registration for the spring semester, a 
description of their proposed research project to the Undergraduate Honors 
Committee (Professor Stephen Klineberg, chair). This committee, in consultation 
with the candidate, evaluates the proposal in terms of both its feasibility and its 
sociological significance. Upon acceptance into the program, the student is as- 
signed a faculty adviser to supervise the student's independent research and the 
selection of further courses relevant to the project. It is expected that all honors 
candidates will have completed Sociology 421 before beginning their second 
semester of honors research. 

Honor students register for two successive semesters of directed honors 
research (Sociology 493, 494). The first semester is normally devoted to a review of 
the relevant literature and the preparation of a detailed outline of the planned 
research. The research itself is normally carried out during the second semester 
and written up as a completed honors thesis by the end of that period. 

The thesis is read and evaluated by two other faculty members in addition to 
the student's primary adviser and followed by an oral examination open to the 
public. These three faculty members share responsibility for determining depart- 
mental honors based on the student's performance in the program as a whole. 



Sociology 

Sociology Courses 

203. Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3). 

Introduction to the principal concepts, theories, and methods of sociology. 

Mr. Martin 

231. Race and Nationality (3-0-3). 

The role of race and nationality in society, ethnic cultures, prejudice, political institu- 
tions, patterns of conflict and cooperation; discrimination and its remedies. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

301. Social Inequality (3-0-3). 

A study of the extent of social inequality, its causes, costs, and benefits. Should (and can) 
it be abolished? Is inequality compatible with democracy? Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

303. The Needs of Strangers (3-0-3). 

A seminar to provide an intellectual framework for analyzing human efforts to help 
others. Readings in the humanities and social sciences will focus on such issues as: What are 
the most effective ways of helping others? What are the unintended consequences of good 
deeds? Is altruism a basic human trait? Which needs are best met through voluntary activity 
and which can best be met by government? Permission of instructor required. Students 
involved in community service are encouraged to apply. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 



SOCIOLOGY 405 

306. Sociology of Gender (3-0-3). 

Relationship between gender and social role. Development of the contemporary sexual 
division of labor and process of socialization with reference to family, education, media, and 
occupations. 

Ms. Long 

308. Houston: Sociology of a City (3-0-3). 

An approach to urban sociology, using metropolitan Houston as a case study. Neighbor- 
hoods, politics, transportation, land use, ethnic groups, housing, cultural institutions. Field 
trips required. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

311. Collective Behavior (3-0-3). 

Consideration of relatively noninstitutionalized conduct: crowds, mobs, publics, social 
movements; conditions and consequences of social unrest, excitement, panic, protest, and 
terrorism. 

Mr. Gordon 

313. Demography (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of dynamics of population change. Demographic data 
sources, components of population change, mortality patterns, family planning, the mea- 
surement of migrations, population-economic models. 

Mr. Smith 

319. The Sociology of Work Occupations (3-0-3). 

The influence that occupation has upon lifestyle, values, social and economic status, 
and views of the world. Field work by the student will be encouraged. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

321. Criminology (3-0-3). 

Types of criminal behavior, theories of crime and juvenile delinquency, with attention 
to the role of police, courts, correction agencies, and other social structures. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Martin 

325. Bureaucracy (3-0-3). 

The bureaucratic "revolution" and its implications in relation to work, social structure, 
quality of life, the possibility of democracy. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Long 

331. Politics and Society in Texas (3-0-3). 

Texas as an emerging industrialized state with deep roots in a Southern rural past. 
Populism; "folk conservatism"; cosmopolites and yahoos; theories of how Texas politics 
works. 

Mr. Davidson 

334. Family Structures and Processes (3-0-3). 

Comparative analysis of role structure, sexuality, emotional bonds, and interaction 
patterns in differing forms of contemporary families. The functioning of the family in 
differing cultures, classes, and lifestyles. 

Staff 

336. Mass Communications (3-0-3). 

Structure, social context, and efforts of large-scale impersonal communication to 
dispersed and heterogeneous audiences, through such media as televison, radio, print, 
motion pictures, and recordings. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Gordon 



406 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

340. Marx and Freud: Humanism and Terror (3-0-3). 

Exploration of two revolutionary modern thinkers, focusing on the tension between 
freedom and determinism in their thought and the theory and practice of their heirs. Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

353. Conceptions of Human Nature (3-0-3). 

The perspectives of sociobiology, psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and symbolic interac- 
tionism; the "paradigm shift" toward viewing human beings as actively engaged in the 
construction of reality. 

Mr. Klineberg 

354. Personality and Social Systems (3-0-3). 

An attempted integration of the perspectives of psychology and sociology in relation to 
the determinants of individual behavior and to the processes of social change. 

Mr. Klineberg 

360. Television in American Culture (3-0-3). 

Analysis of telvision as popular art, in the context of politics, industry, and other 
cultural forms. 

Mr. Gordon 

375. Power Structure Analysis (3-0-3). 

Theories of how power is distributed in America. Controversies about methods for 
determining "who really rules." Elites, social classes, interest groups. Informal cliques. 
Interlocking directorates. The role of private clubs and exclusive schools in elite recruitment. 
Research will be conducted by students, using a city or state as a laboratory. Not offered 
1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

386. Sexuality and the Social Order (3-0-3). 

Ways societies conceive of and regulate sexuality in members' lives; sexual value 
systems; forms of sexual conduct (especially number and identities of participants and 
intimacy and power relations among them); the changing role of sexuality over the typical life 
span; forms and effects of sexual communication, and issues in the future of sexuality. 

Mr. Gordon 

390. Sociology of Leisure (3-0-3). 

Leisure activity (relaxation, diversion, personal development, creativity, and sensual 
transcendence) in relation to work, family, education, income, socioeconomic status, and 
life-cycle stage. Not offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Gordon 

403. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Directed reading and written papers on subjects not regularly offered; advanced study 
of subjects on which courses are offered. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

Staff 

404. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Directed reading and written papers on subjects not regularly offered; advanced study 
of subjects on which courses are offered. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

Staff 



SOCIOLOGY 407 

421. The Craft of Sociology (3-0-3). 

What has been, and is today, the "work" of sociology? This question will be addressed 
by a self-reflective exploration of the discipline — its historical and social origins and devel- 
opment, its shifting philosophical foundations, its methodological refinements, its ethical 
and political implications — and discussion of sociological studies, both classic and 
controversial. 

Ms. Long 

425. Political Sociology (3-0-3). 

Examination of social phenomena that impinge on political systems; mass society, 
informal power structures, ideology, intergroup conflict, insurgent social movements Not 
offered 1988-89. 

Mr. Davidson 

430. Sociology of Religion (3-0-3). 

Religious beliefs, symbols, actions, organizations, roles, and various interrelationships 
between religion and society, including new religious movements, secularization, and func- 
tional alternatives to religion. Field work. 

Mr. Martin 

432. Sociology of the Life Cycle IL Adulthood and Aging (3-0-3). 

Seminar analyzing identity transformations, adult socialization, occupation, family, 
role losses, and death from young adulthood through old age. Effects of sex role, social class' 
and ethnicity. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Gordon 

433. Sociology of the Life Cycle: Death and Dying (3-0-3). 

Consideration of the social meanings of death in various cultures; medical and other 
definitions of death; attitudes toward death and dying; career of the self in life and death; too- 
early, on-time and too-late deaths; "near-death experiences"; social management of death 
and dying in various organizational settings (homes, hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, 
battle fields, etc.); changing causes of death, mortality rates and demographic characteristics 
of dying persons; various types of death (suicide, accident, illness, murder, war, etc.); 
relations of aging and death; implications of changing death patterns for individuals! 
families, organizations, and societies in this nuclear age. 

Mr. Gordon 

436. Sociology of Literature (3-0-3). 

Examination of social actors and institutions involved in production, dissemination, 
and reception of literature: authors, publishers, and other literary "gatekeepers;" critics who 
shape the literary canon; and audiences — what they read and how books ("good" or "trash") 
function in their lives. Not offered 1988-89. 

Ms. Long 

450. Topics in the Study of Religion: Fundamentalism (3-0-3). 

An examination of fundamentalist religious institutions, behavior, and thought with 
consideration of fundamentalist attitudes toward, participation in, and impact on politics, 
economics, education, mass communication and family life. Attention will be given to both 
Christian and Islamic examples. Some field work required. Not offered 1 988-89. 

Mr. Martin 

470. Popular Culture (3-0-3). 

Analysis of social origins, significance, and implications of various types of media, arts, 
and popular entertainment. Enrollment limited. Not offered 1988-89 

Staff 



408 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

481. Perspectives on the Future (3-0-3). 

An exploration of the major processes underlying the transformation of industrial 
societies, with particular reference to the impact of technological developments and environ- 
mental constraints, as they interact with human values and aspirations, to shape the contours 
of the future. 

Mr. Klineberg 

492. Directed Honors Research (3-0-3). 

Sociological research under faculty supervision. First semester: review of relevant 
literature and preparation of outline for planned research. Second semester: research carried 
out and honors thesis completed. Open only to students in sociology honors program. 

493. Directed Honors Research (3-0-3). 

Sociological research under faculty supervision. First semester: review of relevant 
literature and preparation of outline for planned research. Second semester: research carried 
out and honors thesis completed. Open only to students in sociology honors program. 

496. Research: Houston Area Survey (3-0-3). 

The "research team" will continue the series of annual surveys exploring the ways 
Houston residents are reacting to changes in American society. By participating fully in 
sampling procedures, questionnaire construction, interviewing, and data analysis, students 
will gain direct experience with the logic and skills of survey research, in a project of 
professional quality. 

Mr. Klineberg 



Space Physics and Astronomy 



Professor Dessler, Chair 

Professors Chamberlain, Clayton, Cloutier, Dufour, 

Dunning, Few, J.W. Freeman, Assistant Chairman, Haymes, 

Heymann, Michel, O'Dell, Stebbings, Walters, Weisheit, and Wolf 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Jost, Noble, and Newman 

Senior Research Scientists Hill, Reiff and Voigt 

Associate Research Scientist Smith 

Assistant Research Scientist Ledley 

Degrees Offered: B.A. in physics with space physics and astronomy option, 
M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. There is no undergraduate major in the department; 
however, the Department of Physics offers a space physics and astronomy option 
leading to a B.A. with a major in physics for students with an interest in studies 
directed toward space physics and astronomy. The course requirements for this 
option can be satisfied in any order consistent with prerequisites. The following is 
a typical program (laboratory courses in parentheses): 

First Year: Physics 1 1 , 1 02, or 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 ( 1 32) 

Mathematics 101, 102 
Chemistry 101, 102(107) 
Second Year: Space Physics and Astronomy 251,252 (262) 

Physics 201, 202 (231) 
Mathematics 211,212 
Third Year: Physics 301, 302 (331, 332) 



SPACE PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 409 

Physics 31 1,312 

Mathematics or Mathematical Sciences elective 
Fourth Year: Space Physics and Astronomy 47 1 (43 1 , 432) 

Physics 425 
Math elective 

Additional courses in space physics, electrical engineering, mathematics, 
computer science, geology, and other subjects may be helpful to undergraduates 
enrolled in the space physics option. The department has prepared a list of such 
courses and should be consulted prior to registration. In addition to the depart- 
mental requirements for the major, students must also satisfy the distribution 
requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours outside the depart- 
mental requirements for a total program of at least 1 40 semester hours. See Degree 
Requirements and Majors, pages 62-82. 

Graduate Program. Research opportunities exist for graduate studies leading 
to degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of 
Space Physics and Astronomy. To gain such a degree, a student must be knowl- 
edgeable in many areas of space physics and astronomy and expert in at least one. 

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the Department's activities, holders 
of bachelor's degrees in astronomy, chemistry, electrical engineering, geophysics, 
physics, or any of several other scientific and engineering disciplines may apply for 
admission to graduate study in the department. Research programs in the Depart- 
ment of Space Physics and Astronomy include astronomy, astrophysics, atmos- 
pheric electricity, atomic physics, experimental and theoretical space plasma 
physics, meteoritics, and planetary atmospheres. 

The requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are outlined below. A booklet 
giving more detailed and specific information is available from the departmental 
office. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science.Candidates for the master's 
degree must complete successfully at least 30 semester hours of approved graduate 
level studies and must demonstrate an understanding of physics and astronomy in 
an oral examination by their faculty committee. They must prepare a written thesis 
on an original research topic and defend the thesis orally. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.The basic requirement 
for a doctorate is demonstration of the capacity for independent, original research. 
Additional formal requirements are indicated below. 

A student is normally admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree by satisfying 
the requirements for the M.S. degree in space physics and astronomy as outlined 
above. A student who already holds a recognized M.S. degree or who does not 
desire to receive a master's degree may become a candidate for the Ph.D. through 
procedures described in the booklet available from the departmental office. 

Candidates who hold a master's degree could possibly complete requirements 
for the doctorate in two years; however, a minimum of three years' graduate study 
is normally required. Students must complete at least 60 semester hours of 
approved graduate level studies, prepare a thesis on an original research topic, and 
defend the thesis orally. The thesis must be of a quality acceptable for publication 
in a reputable scientific journal. Further details of research programs in space 
physics and astronomy and departmental degree requirements are contained in a 
pamphlet available on request from the Department of Space Physics and 
Astronomy. 



4 1 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Space Physics and Astronomy Courses 

201. Stars, Galaxies and the Universe (3-0-3). 

An introductory course for students in academic programs. The formation, evolution, 
and death of stars; the composition and evolution of galaxies; the structure and evolution of 
the universe. No prerequ